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Full text of "Fisheries of the United States"

Current Fishery Statistics No. 9600 

Fisheries 

of the 

United States, 

1996 

July 1997 




U.S. DEPARTMENT National Oceanic and National Marine 

OF COMIUIERCE Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service 



Current Fishery Statistics No. 9600 

Fisheries 

of the 

United States, 

1996 



MAR 2 8 2005 




Prepared by: 
Fisheries Statistics Division 

Mark C. Holliday, Chief 
Barbara K. O'Bannon, Editor 



Silver Spring, MD 
July 1997 



^^QATMOi^,, 




^''^^SoTc-C' 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, 

William Daley, Secretary 

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 

D.James Baker, Undersecretary 

National Marine Fisheries Service 

Rolland A. Schmitten, Assistant Administrator 



For sale by dK Siqierintcndent of Documents, U^. Govcnunent Printing Office 
Washington, D.C 20402 



PREFACE 



FISHERIES OF TH E UNITED STATES. 1996 

This publication Is a preliminary report for 1996 on 
commercial and recreational fisheries of the United 
States witti catches in botti ttie U.S. and foreign Exclusive 
Economic Zones (EEZ). This annual report provides timely 
answers to frequently asked questions. 

SOUBCESOFDATA 

InfoiTTXJtIon In this report came from many sources. 
Field offices of ttie National Marine Fisheries Service 
(NMFS), in cooperation wttti various States, collected and 
compiled data on U.S. commercial landings and 
processed fishery products. The NMFS Fisheries Statistics 
and Economics Division in Sliver Spring, MD, managed ttie 
collection and compilation of recreational statistics, and 
tabulated and prepared all data for publication. Sources 
of other data appearing in ttiis publication are: U.S. 
Bureau of ttie Census, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. 
Coast Guard, U.S. Customs Service, U.S. Department of 
the Interior, and U.S. Department of Agriculture, and 
Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of ttie United 
Nations. 

PRELIMINARY AND FINAL DATA 

Data on U.S. commerctal and recreational landings, 
employment, prices, and production of processed 
products are preliminary for 1996. Final data will be 
published In other NMFS Current Fishery Statistics 
publications. 

The Fisheries Statistics Division of NMFS takes ttils 
opportunity to ttiank members of states, industry, and 
foreign nations who provided the data that made this 
publication possible. 

Program leaders of the field offices were: Gregory 
Power, New Engtand, Middle Atlantic, and Chesapeake; 
Tony Frank, National Biological Service Science Center, 
Great Lakes States; Nelson Johnson, Guy Davenport, 
and Margot HIghtower for the South Atlantic and Gulf 
States; Patricia J. Donley, California and Hawaii; John K. 
Bishop, Oregon and Washington; and Patsy Bearden, 
Alaska. 

NOTES 

The time series of U.S. catch by species and 
distance from shore Included In this year's "Fisheries of 



the U.S. 
Service. 



is estimated by the National Marine Fisheries 



As In post issues of this pulDlication, the units of 
quantity and value are defined as follows: U.S. landings 
are shown in round weight (except nnollusks which are In 
meat weight), unless otherwise noted; quantities shown 
for U.S. imports and exports are In product weight, as 
reported by the U.S. Bureau of the Census, unless 
otherwise noted; the value of the U.S. domestic 
commercial catch is exvessel (in ihe Review Section on 
important species actual and deflated exvessel prices 
are showm. The deflated value was computed using the 
Gross Domesflc Products Implicit Price Deflator); the 
value for U.S. Imports is generally the nnartcet value In the 
foreign (exporting) country and, therefore, excludes U.S. 
Import duties, fl-elght charges from the foreign country to 
the United States, and Insurance; ttie value for exports is 
generally the value at ihe U.S. port of export, based on 
the selling price. Including Inland fi-elght. Insurance, and 
other charges. Countries and territories shown In the U.S. 
foreign trade section are established for statistical 
purposes In the Tariff Schedules of Vne United States 
Annotated (International Trade Commission) and 
reported by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. 

SUGGESTIONS 

The Fisheries Statistics Division wishes to provide \hB 
kinds of data sought by users of fishery statistics, and 
welcomes any comments or suggestions that will Improve 
tills publication. 

Address all comments or questions to: 

Fisheries Statistics and Economics Division, (F/STl) 
National Marine Fisheries Servkie, NOAA 
1315 East-West Highway - Rm. 12340 
Sliver Spring, MD 20910-3282 
PHONE: 301-713-2328 
FAX: 301-713-4137 

Members of the Fisheries Statistics Division in Silver 
Spring, v»/ho helped with tills publication were: Darryi 
Bullock, Josanne Fabian, Tom Ferris, Karen Foster, Amy 
Gautam, Ray Glass, Gerry Gray, Deborah Hogans, Mari< 
HoiiteJay, Steven Koplln, Steve Myers, BartDora O'Bannon, 
Maury Osbom, Uz Pritchard, Ron Salz, Warren Schlechte, 
Dick Schween, David Sutheriand, Glen Taylor, William 
Utfley, David Van Voortiees, John Ward, and Leila Wise. 



CONTENTS 



Paqw iii:! 

ii ppl7. S. EXPOBXS — Continued: 
l^ll Crabmeat 

iv ^^i Herring 

^^ Industrial 



Paga 



PBBFACE MID ACKSOWUCDGOIBST . 



BBVIBH. 



U.S. COHUESCIAL FISBESY LAMDJJfiSS; 

Species , 

Disposition 

States , 

Regions 

Ports 

Catch by species and distance from 

shore (thousand pounds) 

Catch by species and distance from 

shore (metric tons) 

U.S. Landings for Territorial 

Processions 

U.S. Aquaculture Production, 

Estimated 1984-1995 



Historical Landings of Swordfish, 
by state 



U.S. HURXSB JtECRBATJONAI. FISBBRIES 

MRFSS sample coverage 

Number of participants and trips 

Number of fish caught and the weight 
of Harvest, by species and sub- 
region or by species and area fished. 

tKSiLD FISBBRIES: 

U.S. and world 

Countries 

Continents 

Fishing areas 

Species groups 

Disposition 

Imports and exports, by leading 
countries 



U.S. PRODUCXIOB OF PROCESSBD FISBBFOT PRODUCTS: 
Value 

Fish sticks, fish portions, and 

breaded shrimp 

Fillets and steaks 

Canned 

Industrial 

17. S. COLD STORAGE BOLDIBGS 

17. S. mPOBXS: 

Principal items 

Edible and nonedible 

Value and duties 

Continent and country 

Blocks 

Groundfish fillets and steaks, 

species 

Canned tuna and quota 

Shrimp, country of origin 

Shrimp, by product type 

Industrial 

U.S. EXPORTS: 

Principal items 

Edible and nonedible 

Continent and country 

Shrimp 

Salmon 

Crab 



1 
3 
4 
4 
5 

6 

10 

14 

18 

20 

26 
28 
29 



83 
84 
85 
85 

86 
86 



89 

89 
90 
91 
93 



98 
99 

100 

100 

101 
102 
103 
103 



105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 



I U.S. SUPPLY: 

Edible and nonedible.. 
Finfish and shellfish. 
Blocks 

; All fillets and steaks 
; Groundfish fillets and 
: Tuna, fresh and frozen 
; Canned sardines 
: Canned salmon.. 
; Canned tuna. . . . 

King crab 

; Snow (tanner) crab 

Canned crabmeat . . 

Lobster, American 

Lobster, Spiny 

Clams 

Oysters . . . 
; Scallops . . 

Shrimp. . . . 

Industrial 



\PER CAPITA: 

U.S. consumption 

U.S. use 

I World consumption-by region 
i and country 



\PRICES, IHDEX OF EXVESSEL , 

;: VALUE ADDED , 

;; EMPLOYMENT, CRAFT, ABD PLABTS 

Ifisbery products IBSPECTIOB 



tUAGNUSOH FISBERT OMSERVATIOB ABD 
i MABAGOiBBT ACT OF 1976 (MFOIA) : 

General 

i Optimum yield, U.S. capacity, reserve, 
and allocations 

i general adhibistrative information 

Ipoblicatons; 

NOAA Library Services 

Government Printing Office 

I National Marine Fisheries Service — 
i Natl. Technical Informaton Service... 



^SERVICES; 

j: National Marine Fisheries Service 

I Bulletin Boards 

FAX-on-Demand 

I NMFS HomePages 

I Sea Grant Marine Advisory 
I Fisheries Development.... 

;; Inspection Inside back cover 

I GLOSSARY 



110 
110 

111 



113 
114 
115 
115 
115 
116 
117 
117 
117 
118 
118 

118 
119 
119 
120 
120 
120 
121 
122 



124 
127 

128 

130 

132 

133 

136 

138 

141 
142 

148 
148 



155 
156 
158 
160 
162 



163 
167 



REVIEW 



U.S. LANDINGS . Commercial landings (edible and 
industrial) by U.S. fishermen at ports in the 50 states 
were 9.6 billion pounds or 4.3 million metric tons 
valued at a record $3.5 billion in 1 996-a decrease of 
222.7 million pounds (down 2 percent), and $248.9 
million (down 7 percent) compared with 1995. The 
1996 landings showed a decrease in major species 
such as Pacific hake, menhaden, pollock, pink and 
red salmon, and Pacific sardine when compared 
with 1995. The 1996 average exvessel price per 
pound paid to fishermen was 36 cents compared to 
the 38 cents they received in 1995. Finfish 

accounted for 86 percent of total landings, but only 
51 percent of the total value. 



Commercial landings by U.S. fishermen at 
ports outside the 50 states or transferred to internal 
water processing vessels (IWPs) were an additional 
404.5 million pounds (1 83,500 metric tons) valued at 
$1 59.4 million. This was a 1 1 percent, or 47.7 million 
pounds (21 ,600 metric ton) decrease in quantity and 
a $16.9 million (9 percent) decrease in value 
compared with 1995. Most of these landings 
consisted of halibut landings in Canada, tuna 
landed in Puerto Rico, American Samoa and other 
foreign ports, and IWP transfers of sea herring. 

Edible fish and shellfish landings in the 50 
states were 7.5 billion pounds (3.4 million metric tons) 
in 1 996-a decrease of 192 million pounds (87,100 
metric tons) compared with 1995. 

Landings for reduction and other industrial 
purposes were 2.1 billion pounds (948,000 metric 
tons) in 1996~a decrease of 1 percent compared 
with 1995. 

The 1996 U.S. marine recreational finfish 
catch (including fish caught and released alive) on 
the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific coasts was an 
estimated 313.8 million fish taken on an estimated 
64.2 million fishing trips. The harvest (fish kept) was 
estimated at 146.0 million fish weighing 208.3 million 
pounds. 



WORLD LANDINGS . In 1995, the most recent year for 
v^ich data are available, world commercial fishery 
landings were 1 12.9 million metric tons--an increase 
of 2.4 million metric tons (up 2 percent) compared 
with 1994. 

China was the leading nation with 21.6 
percent of the total catch; Peru, second with 7.9 
percent; Chile, third with 6.7 percent; Japan, fourth 
with 6.0 percent; and United States, fifth with 5.0 
percent. 



PRICES . The 1996 annual exvessel price index for 
edible fish and shellfish decreased 1 5 percent from 
1 995. The annual index for industrial fish remained 
the same compared with 1995. Exvessel price 
indices decreased for 22 of the 32 species groups 
being tracked, increased for 9 species groups and 
stayed constant for only 1 species groups. The 
bluefin tuna price index had the largest decrease 
(76 percent) while the hard clams price index had 
the largest increase (31 percent). 

PROCESSED PRODUCTS . The estimated value of the 
1996 domestic production of edible and nonedible 
fishery products was $7.4 billion, $131.3 million (2 
percent) less than the $7.5 billion in 1995. The value 
of edible products was $6.6 billion--a decrease of 
$224.7 million (5 percent) compared with 1995. The 
value of industrial products was $782.8 million In 
1996-an increase of $193.4 million (33 percent) 
compared with 1995. 

FOREIGN TRADE . The total import value of edible 
and nonedible fishery products was $13.1 billion in 
1996~an increase of $608.7 million (5 percent) 
compared with 1995. Imports of edible fishery 
products (product weight) were 3.2 billion pounds 
(1 .4 million metric tons) valued at $6.7 billion in 1996- 
an increase of 103.3 million pounds (3 percent), but 
a decrease of 62.1 million (1 percent) compared with 
1995. Imports of nonedible (i.e., industrial) products 
were $6.3 billion~an increase of $670.8 million (11 
percent) compared with 1995. 



REVIEW 



Total export value of edible and nonedible 
fishery products was $8.7 billion in 1996-an increase 
of $385.3 million (5 percent) compared with 1995. 
United States firms exported 2.1 billion pounds 
(958,022 metric tons) of edible products valued at 
$3.0 billion-an increase of 64.9 million pounds 
(29/427 metric tons), but a decrease of $230.0 million 
compared with 1995. Exports of nonedible products 
were valued at a record $5.6 billion, $615.3 million 
more than 1995. 

SUPPLY . The U.S. supply of edible fishery products 
domestic landings plus imports, round weight 
equivalent) was 13.6 billion pounds (6.2 million metric 
tons) in 1996~an increase of 41.0 million pounds 
compared with 1995. The supply of industrial fishery 
products was 2.8 billion pounds (1 .3 million metric tons) 
in 1996--a decrease of 51.0 billion pounds (2 
percent)com pared with 1995. 



PER CAPITA CONSUMPnON U.S. consumption of hery 
products was 14.8 pounds of edible meat per person 
in 1996, down 0.2 pound from the 1995 per capita 
consumption of 1 5.0 pounds. 



CONSUMER EXPENDITURES . U.S. consumers spent an 
estimated $41.2 billion for fishery products in 1996. 
The 1996 total includes $27.8 billion in expenditures at 
food service establishments (restaurants, carry-outs, 
caterers, etc.); $13.2 billion in retail sales for home 
consumption; and $283.9 million for industrial fish 
products. By producing and marketing a variety of 
fishery products for domestic and foreign markets, 
the commercial marine fishing industry contributed 
$21.0 billion (in value added ) to the U.S. Gross 
National Product. 




REVIEW 



OTHER IMPORTANT FACTS 



Alaska pollock, with landings of 2.6 billion 
pounds (1.2 million metric tons), was the most 
important species in quantity and fifth in value for 
1 996, accounting for 27 percent of the commercial 
fishery landings in the United States. 



Menhaden was the second most important 
species in quantity, but low in value. 



Salmon were third in quantity and third in value. 

Cods were fourth in quantity and seventh in 
value. 

Hakes were fifth in quantity, but low in value. 

Fbunders were sixth in quantity, and sixth in value. 

Shrimp were first in value, but eighth in quantity. 

Crabs were second in value, but seventh in 
quantity. 

Lobsters were low in quantity, but fourth in value. 



Tuna kandings by U.S.-flag vessels at ports outside 
the continental United States amounted to 370.8 
million pounds. Halibut and sea herring also were 
landed at ports outside the United States or 
transferred to internal water processing vessels in U.S. 
waters. 

Dutch Harbor-Unalaska, Alaska, was the leading 
U.S. port in quantity of commercial fishery landings, 
followed by: Empire-Venice, Louisiana; Cameron, 
Louisiana; Seattle, Washington; and Kodiak, Alaska. 

Dutch Harbor-Unalaska was also the leading U.S. 
port in terms of value, followed by: New Bedford, 
Massachusetts; Kodiak, Alaska; Key West, Florida; and 
Brownsville-Port Isabel, Texas. 

Alaska led all states in volume vA\h landings of 5.0 
billion pounds, followed by Louisiana, 1.1 billion; 
Virginia, 659.7 million; California, 460.7 million; and 
Washington, 391 .7 million pounds. 

Alaska led all states in value of landings with $1 .2 
billion, followed by Louisiana, $267.3 million; 
Massachusetts, $231.4 million; Florida, $205.2 million; 
and Maine $200.9 million. 




REVIEW 



IMPORTANT SPECIES 



ALASKA POLLOCK AND OTHER PACIFIC TRAWL FISH . 

U.S. landings of Pacific frawl fisli (Pacific cod, floun- 
ders, hake. Pacific ocean perch, Aiaska pollock, 
and rockfishes) were 4.2 billion pounds valued at 
$494.4 million-a decrease of 3 percent in quantit/ 
and a 2 percent decrease in value compared with 
1995. 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1987-1996 
Alaska Pollock, Other Pacific Trawl Fish 




1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 
HPounds *Value ♦Deflated Value 



Landings of Alaska pollock decreased 8 
percent to 2.6 billion pounds and were 13 percent 
lowerthanthe 1991-1995 5-year average. Landings 
of Pacific cod were 605.3 million pounds - an in- 
crease of 2 percent from 591 .4 million pounds in 
1995. Pacific hake (whifing) landings were 430.5 
million pounds (up 10 percent) valued at $17.0 mil- 
lion (down 5 percent from 1 995). Landings of rock- 
fishes were 94.8 million pounds (up 5 percent) and 
valued at $39.0 million (down 5 percent) compared 
to 1995. The 1996 rockfish landings were 1 percent 
lower than the 5-year average. 



ANCHOVIES . U.S. landings of anchovies were 9.9 
million pounds-an increase of 3. 1 million pounds (46 
percent) compared with 1 995. Fifty-three percent 
of ail landings were used for bait. 



percent) and $16.7 (25 percent) compared with 
1 995. The Pacific fishery accounted for all but 29,000 
poundsofthe 1996 total halibut catch. Theaverage 
exvessel price per pound in 1996 was $1.70 com- 
pared with $1.47 in 1995. 



HERRING. SEA . U.S. commercial landings of sea 
herring were 317.6 million pounds valued at $80.9 
million-an increase of 52.9 million pounds (20 per- 
cent) and $23.0 million (40 percent) compared with 
1995. Landings of Atianfic sea herring were 197.1 
million pounds valued at $1 1 .2 million-an increase 
of 49.9 million pounds (34 percent) and $2.5 million 
(29 percent) compared with 1 995. 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1987-1996 
Atlantic Sea Herring 



Million lbs 




1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 
SPounds ^Value ♦Deflated Value 



Landings of Pacific sea herring were 1 20.4 
million pounds valued at $69.7 million-an increase 
of 3.0 million pounds (3 percent) and $20.5 million (42 
percent) compared with 1995. Alaska landings 
accounted for 86 percent of the Pacific coast with 
107.4 million pounds valued at $54.8 million-an in- 
crease of 1.3 million pounds (1 percent) and $15.7 
million (40 percent) compared with 1995. 



HALIBUT . U.S. landings ofAflantic and Pacific halibut 
were 49.1 million pounds (round weight) valued at 
$83.5 million-an increase of 4.3 million pounds (10 



JACK MACKEREL . California accounted for 1 00 per- 
cent of the U.S. landings of jack mackerel in 1996. 
Total landings were 4.8 million pounds valued at 



REVIEW 



IMPORTANT SPECIES 



$296,000--an increase of 666,000 pounds (16 per- 
cent), and $ 1 7,000 (6 percent) compared with 1 995. 
The 1996 average exvessel price per pound stayed 
constant at 6 cents. 



valuedat$39.7million. Gulf region landings were 1.1 
billion pounds valued at $54.5 million. Menhaden 
are used primarily for the production of meal, oil, 
and solubles. Small quantities are used for bait and 
animal food. 



MACKEREL. ATLANTIC . U.S.Iandingsof Atlanticmack- 
erel were 34.8 million pounds valued at $4.6 million- 
-an increase of 1 6. 1 million pounds (86 percent) and 
$1.9 million (68 percent) compared with 1995. Rhode 
Island with 1 3.8 million pounds and New Jersey with 
1 8.0 million pounds had atotal of 91 percent of the 
total landings. The average exvessel price per pound 
in 1996 was 13 cents, down from 15 cents in 1995. 



MACKEREL. CHUB . Landings of Chub mackerel were 
22.0 million pounds valued at $1.3 million-- an in- 
crease of 3.0 million pounds (16 percent) and 
$206,000 (18 percent) compared with 1996. The 
average exvessel price per pound stayed at 6 cents. 



MENHADEN . The U.S. menhaden landings were 1 .8 
billion pounds valued at $94.2 million-a decrease of 
91 .5 million pounds (5 percent) and $5.0 million (5 
percent) compared with 1995. Landings decreased 
by 1 34.6 million pounds (1 7 percent) in the Atlantic 
states and increased 43.2 million pounds (4 percent) 
in the Gulf states compared with 1995. Landings 
along the Atlantic coast were 671 .7 million pounds 



NORTH ATLANTIC TRAWL FISH . Landings of butterfish, 
Atlantic cod, cusk, flounders (blackback, fluke, yel- 
lowtail and other), haddock, red and white hake, 
ocean perch, pollock and whiting (silver hake) in the 
North Atlantic (combination of New England, Middle 
Atlantic, and Chesapeake Regions) were 1 34.7 mil- 
lion pounds valued at $ 1 1 5.2 million-an increase of 
16.6 million pounds (14 percent), but a decrease of 
$7.2 million (6 percent) compared with 1995. Of 
these species, flounder led in total value in the North 
Atlantic accounting for 49 percent of the total; 
followed by cod, 23 percent; and whiting, 1 2 per- 
cent. 

The 1 996 landings of Atlantic cod were 31 .4 
million pounds valued at $26.6 million-an increase 
of 1 .8 million pounds (6 percent), but a decrease of 
1.6 million (5 percent) compared with 1995. The 
exvessel price per pound was 85 cents in 1 996 down 
from 95 cents per pound in 1995. 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1987-1996 
Atlantic and Gulf Menhaden 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1987-1996 
North Atlantic Trawl Fish 



Million $ 



Million $ 




1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 
■ Pounds ^Value ♦Deflated Value 




1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 
■ Pounds -*-Value ♦Deflated Value 



REVIEW 



IMPORTANT SPECIES 



Landings of yellowtaii flounder were 5.3mil- 
lion pounds--an increase of 1.1 million pounds (28 
percent) from 1 995, and about 55 percent of its 5- 
yeor average. 

Haddock landings increased to 1 .3 million 
pounds (43 percent) and $1.5 million (24 percent) 
compared to 1995. 

Nortin Atlantic pollock landings were 6.5 mil- 
lion pounds valued at $4.5 million-a decrease of 
623,000 pounds (9 percent) and $2.1 million (31 
percent) compared witli 1995. 



PACIFIC SALMON . U.S. commercial landings of 
salmon were 877.1 million pounds valued at $368.7 
million-a decrease of 143.7 million pounds (14 per- 
cent), and $117.4 million (24 percent) compared 
with 1995. Alaska and Washington accounted for 97 
percent and 2 percent of the total landings, 
respectively. Sockeye salmon landings were 318.4 
million pounds valued at $266.4 miliion-a decrease 
of 3 1 .2 million pounds (29 percent), and $45.9 million 
(15 percent) compared with 1995. Chinook salmon 
landings decreased to 20.5 million pounds-down 
4.3 million pounds (17 percent) from 1995. Pink 
salmon landings were 309.8 million pounds-a de- 
crease of 134.8 million pounds (30 percent); chum 
salmon increased to 1 80.6 million pounds (1 8 perent); 
and coho salmon decreased to 47.7 million pounds- 
-a decrease of 1 .4 million pounds (3 percent) com- 
pared with 1 995. 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1987-1996 
Pacific Salmon 



Millions (lbs and 




1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 
BPound.s -*-Value ♦Deflated Value 



Alaska landings were 854.8 million pounds 
valued at $352 4 million-a decrease of 1 31 .7 million 
pounds (1 3 percent), and $ 1 08.8 million (24 percent) 
compared with 1995. The distribution of Alaska 
salmon landings by species In 1996 was: sockeye, 
316.4 million pounds (37 percent); pink, 309.8 million 
pounds (36 percent); chum, 1 73.7 million pounds (20 
percent); coho, 45.0 million pounds (5 percent); and 
Chinook, 9.8 million pounds (1 percent). Theexvessel 
price per pound for all species In Alaska was 4 1 cents 
in 1996- a decrease of 6 cents from 1995. 

Washington salmon landings were 14.2 mil- 
lion pounds valued at $6.9 million-a decrease of 
1 0.2 million pounds (42 percent), and $2.6 million (28 
percent)compared with 1995. The biennial fishery 
for pink salmon wentfrom 10.2 million pounds in 1995 
to no catch in 1 996. Washington landings of chum 
salmon were 6.9 million pounds (up 1 percent); 
followed by sockeye, 2.0 million pounds-a decrease 
of 302,000 pounds (down 13 percent); silver, 2.5 
million pounds (down 15 percent); and Chinook, 2.7 
million pounds (up 27 percent) compared with 1 995, 
The average exvessel price per pound for all species 
in Washington increased from 39 cents in 1 995 to 48 
cents in 1 996. 

Oregon salmon landings were 2.8 million 
pounds valued at $3.3 million-an increase of 30,000 
pounds (1 percent), but a decrease of $267,000 (8 
percent) compared with 1995. Landings of Chinook 
salmon were 2.6 million pounds (unchanged); and 
coho, 217, 000 pounds (up 14 percent). The aver- 
age exvessel price per pound for all species in 
Oregon decreased from $1.27 in 1995 to $1.16 in 
1996. 

California salmon landings were 4.7 million 
pounds valued at $6.0 million-a decrease of 1 ,9 
million pounds (29 percent) and $5.7 million (49 
percent) compared with 1995. Landings of Chinook 
salmon were 4.7 million pounds; coho landings were 
1 7,000 pounds . The average exvessel price per pound 
paid to fishermen in 1 996 was $1 .26 compared with 
$1.76 in 1995. 



SABLEFISH . U.S. commercial landings of sablefish 
were 59.9 million pounds valued at $109.0 million-a 
decrease of 5.9 million pounds (9 percent)and a 



REVIEW 



IMPORTANT SPECIES 



decrease of $14.7 million (12 percent) compared 
with 1995, Landings increased in Alaska to 41.0 
million pounds, a decrease of 1 4 percent compared 
with 1995. Landings decreased in Washington to 4.9 
million pounds (10 percent) and $8.4 million (33 
percent). The 1996 Oregon catch was 7.1 million 
pounds (up 1 percent) and $10.1 million (up 9 per- 
cent) compared with 1995. California landings of 
7.0 million pounds and $8.6 million represent an 14 
percent increased in quantity and 20 percent 
increase in value from 1995. The average exvessel 
price per pound in 1996 was $1 .82 compared with 
$1.88 in 1995. 



TUNA . Landings of tuna by U.S. fishermen at ports in 
the 50 United States, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, 
other U.S. territories, andforeign ports were 456.3 
million pounds valued at $266.1 million-a decrease 
of 37.7 million pounds (8 percent) and $11.1 million (4 
percent) compared with 1995. The average exvessel 
price per pound of all species of tuna in 1 996 was 58 
cents compared with 56 cents in 1995. 

Trend in Commercial Landings, 1987-1996 
Tuna (Includes U.S. and Foreign Ports) 



Skipjack landings were 283.4 million pounds- 
-a decrease of 61.2 million pounds (18 percent) 
compared with 1995. The average exvessel price 
per pound was 40 cents in 1 996, compared to 37 
cents in 1 995. 

Yellowfin landings were 1 04.0 million pounds- 
-an increase of 5.7 million pounds (6 percent) com- 
pared with 1995. The average exvessel price per 
pound was 64 cents in 1 996 compared with 69 cents 
in 1995. 

Bluefin landings were 12.1 million pounds- 
an increase of 8.7 million pounds (355 percent) 
compared with 1996. The average exvessel price 
per pound in 1996 was $1.80 compared with $7.51 in 
1995, 



CLAMS . Landings of all species yielded 1 23.2 million 
pounds of meats valued at $127.8 million- a de- 
crease of 1 1 .0 million pounds (8 percent) and $1 2.6 
million (9 percent) compared with 1 995. The aver- 
age exvessel price per pound in 1996 was $10.4 
compared with $ 1 0.5 in 1 995. 



Millions (lbs and value 




1987 HSS iiav 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 
■ Pounds -^Value ♦Deflated Value 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1987-1996 
Clams 



Millions (lbs and 




1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 



iPounds *Value ♦Deflated Value 



Surf clams yielded 63.4 million pounds of 
Bigeye landings in 1996 were 14.4 million meats valued at $38.2 million-an increase of 93,000 
pounds-a decrease of 6.3 million pounds (31 per- pounds (unchanged) but a decrease of $815,000(2 
cent) compared with 1995. The average exvessel percent)compared with 1995, New Jersey was the 
price per pound was $1.91 in 1996 compared with leading State with 48.6 million pounds (unchanged), 
$1.56 in 1995. followed by New York, 7.7 million pounds (up 12 



REVIEW 



IMPORTANT SPECIES 



percent) compared with 1 995. The average exvessel 
price perpound of meats was 60 cents in 1 996, down 
2 cents from 1995. 

The ocean quahog fishery produced 46.5 
million pounds of meats valued at $20.6 million-a 
decrease of 2,5 million pounds (5 percent) and 
$162,000 (1 percent) compared with 1995. New 
Jersey had landings of 1 7.8 million pounds (down 1 8 
percent) valued at $7.3 million (down 15 percent) 
while Massachusetts production was 17.5 million 
pounds (up 20percent) valued at $7.3 million (up 23 
percent). Together, they accounted for 76 percent 
of the total ocean quahog production in 1996. The 
average exvessel price per pound of meats in- 
creased from 42 cents in 1995 to 44 cents in 1996. 



32 percent of the total; Louisiana, 17 percent; 
Maryland, 16 percent; and Virginia, 15 percent of 
the total U.S. landings. Hard blue crab landings in 
the Chesapeake region were 68.3 million pounds-- 
adecrease of 4 percent; Gulf region, 56.9 million, 
increased 20 percent; and the South Atlantic region 
with 86.6 million pounds, increased 30 percent. The 
Middle Atlantic region with 7.2 million pounds val- 
ued at $5.0 million showed a decrease of 8.9 million 
pounds (55 percent) compared with 1995. The 
average exvessel price per pound of hard blue 
crabs was 67 cents in 1 996, five cents less than 1 995. 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1987-1996 
Crabs 



The hard clam fishery produced 10.0 million 
pounds of meats valued at $49.3 million-a decrease 
of 7.8 million pounds (44 percent) and $18.1 million 
(27 percent) compared with 1995. Landings in the 
New England region were 1.5 million pounds of 
meats (down 52 percent); Middle Atlantic region, 
4.6 million pounds (up 1 1 percent); Chesapeake 
region, 796,000 pounds (down 14 percent); and the 
South Atlantic region, 1 .8 million pounds (up 64 per- 
cent). The average exvessel price per pound of 
meats increased from $3.78 in 1 995 to $4.94 in 1 996. 

Soft clams yielded 2.2 million pounds of meats 
valued at $8.3 million-a decrease of 234,000 pounds 
(10 percent) and $2.9 million (26 percent) com- 
pared with 1 995. Maine was the leading state with 
1 .6 million pounds of meats (down 16 percent) fol- 
lowed by Maryland with 319,000 pounds (down 13 
percent) and New York with 205,000 pounds (up 26 
percent). The average exvessel price per pound of 
meats was $3.75 in 1996, compared with $4.57 in 
1995. 



CRABS . Landings of all species of crabs were 391 .8 
million pounds valued at $426.7 million-an increase 
of 28.2 million pounds (8 percent), but a deincrease 
of $85.3 million (17 percent) compared with 1995. 

Hard blue crab landings were 219.0 million 
pounds valued at $147.1 million-an increase of 17.4 
million pounds (9 percent) and $2.4 million (2 per- 
cent) compared with 1 995. North Carolina landed 



Millions (lbs and $) 




1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 
■ Pounds -*-Value ♦Deflated Value 

Dungeness crab landings were 65.0 million 
pounds valued at $87.9 million-an increase of 1 7.2 
million pounds (36 percent) and $8.3 million (10 
percent) compared with 1 995. Washington land- 
ings of 27.5 million pounds (up 29 percent) led all 
states with 42 percent of the total landings. Alaska 
landings were 5.9 million pounds, up 8 percent com- 
pared with 1995. Oregon landings were 19.3 million 
pounds (up 62 percent) and California landings 
were 1 2.3 million pounds (up 34 percent) compared 
with 1995. The average exvessel price per pound 
was $1 .35 in 1996 compared with $1 .66 in 1995. 

U.S. landings of king crab were 21 .0 million 
pounds valued at $62.6 million-an increase of 6.3 
million pounds (43 percent) compared with 1995. 
The average exvessel price per pound in 1996 was 
$2.98 compared with $3. 1 in 1 995. 



REVIEW 



IMPORTANT SPECIES 



Snow (tanner) crab landings were 67.9 mil- 
lion pounds valued at $93.2 million--a decrease of 
13.0 million pounds (16 percent) and $109.1 million 
(54 percent) compared with 1995. The average 
exvessel price per pound was $1 .37 in 1996, down 
from $2.50 in 1995. 



LOBSTER. AMERICAN . American lobster landings 
were 7 1 .6 million pounds valued at $24 1 .8 million--an 
increase of5.2 million pounds (8 percent), and $27.0 
million (13 percent) compared with 1995. Maine led 
in landings for the fifteenth consecutive year with 
36.0 million pounds valued at $106.8 million--a de- 
crease of 504,000 pounds (less than 1 percent) com- 
pared with 1995. Massachusetts, the second lead- 
ing producer, had landings of 15.7 million pounds 
valued at $64.7 million-a decrease of 63,000 pounds 
(less than 1 percent) compared with 1995. Together, 
Maine and Massachusetts produced 72 percent of 
the total national landings. The average exvessel 
price per pound was $3.38 in 1996 compared with 
$3.24 in 1995. 



LOBSTERS. SPINY . U.S. landings of spiny lobster were 
8.3 million pounds valued at $35.2 million-an in- 
crease of 1.2 million pounds (17 percent)-and$l.l 
million (3 percent) compared with 1995. Florida, 
with landings of 7.4 million pounds valued at $28.6 
million, accounted for 90 percent of the total catch 
and 81 percent of the value. This was an increase of 
1.0 million pounds (15 percent), but a decrease of 
$504,000 (62 percent) compared v^/ith 1995. Overall 
the average exvessel price per pound was $4.24 in 
1996 compared with $4.80 in 1995. 

OYSTERS . U.S. oyster landings yielded 38.0 million 
pounds of meats valued at $114.8 million-a 
decrease of 2.4 million pounds (6 percent) and an 
increase of $13.3 million (13 percent) compared 
with 1995. The Gulf region led in production with 21. 6 
million pounds of meats, 57 percent of the national 
total; followed by the Pacific region (principally 
Washington with 82 percent of the region's total 
volume) with 9.7 million pounds (26 percent), and 
the New England region, with 4. 1 million pounds (1 1 
percent). The average exvessel price per pound of 
meats was $3.02 in 1996 compared with $2.52 in 
1995. 



SHRIMP . U.S. landings of shrimp were 316.9 million 
pounds valued at $509.2 million-an increase of 1 0.0 
million pounds (3 percent), but a decrease of $60.8 
million (11 percent) compared with 1995. Shrimp 
landings increased in the South Atlantic (up 3 per- 
cent) and New England (up 46 percent), but de- 
clined by 1 percent in the Gulf, The landings in the 
Pacific increased 1 1 percent when compared with 
1995. The average exvessel price per pound of 
shrimp decreased to $1 .61 in 1996 compared with 
$ 1 .86 in 1 995. Gulf region landings were the nation's 
largest with 21 8.6 million pounds, and 69 percent of 
the national total. Louisiana led all Gulf states with 
90.6 million pounds (up 3 percent), followed by 
Texas, 75.9 million pounds (down 1 percent); Florida 
(West Coast), 25.6 million pounds (up 36 percent); 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1987-1996 
Shrimp 

Millions {lbs and $) 




1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 



■ Pounds rvalue ♦Deflated Value 

Alabama, 16.6 million pounds (down 19 percent); 
and Mississippi, 9.9 million pounds (down 36 per- 
cent), In the Pacific region Oregon had landings of 
15.7 million pounds (up 30 percent), California had 
1 1 .7 pounds (up 53 percent, and Washington land- 
ings of 6,8 million pounds (down 21 percent) com- 
pared with 1 995. 



SCALLOPS . U.S. landings of bay and sea scallops 
totaled 18.2 million pounds of meats valued at 
$101.9 million-a decrease of 372,000 pounds (2 
percent), but an increase of $8. 6 million (9 percent) 



REVIEW 



IMPORTANT SPECIES 



compared with 1 995. The average exvessel price 
per pound of meats increased from $5.03 in 1995 to 
$5.60 in 1996. 

Bay scaiiop landings were 35,000 pounds of 
meats vaiued at $94,000-a decrease of 218,000 
pounds (86 percent) and $444,000 (83 percent) 
compared with 1 995. The average exvessel price 
per pound of meats was $2,68 in 1996 compared 
with $2.13 in 1995. 



Sea scallop landings were 1 8.2 million pounds 
of meats valued at $101.8 million-a decrease of 
154,000 pound (1 percent), but an increase of $9.0 
million (10 percent) compared with 1995. Massa- 
chusetts and Virginia were the leading states in 
landings of sea scallops with 8.6 and 5.0 million 
pounds of meats, respectively. These represent 75 
percent of the national total. The average exvessel 
price per pound of meats in 1 996 was $5.61 com- 
pared with $5.07 in 1995. 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1987-1996 
Atlantic Sea Scallops 

Million lbs Million $ 




1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 
HPounds -*-Value ♦Deflated Value 



There were no reported commercial land- 
ings of calico scallops in 1996. 



SQUID . U.S. commercial landingsof squid were 240.0 
million pounds valued at $60.2 million-an increase 
of 1 0.5 million pounds (5 percent) and $4.3 million (8 
percent) compared with 1 995. California was the 
leading state with 173.7 million pounds, 72 percent 
of the national total. The Pacific region landings 
were 1 74.8 million pounds (up 1 3 percent), followed 
by the New England region, 34,0 million pounds 
(down 4 percent); the Middle Atlantic region, 29.9 
million pounds (down 1 9 percent); and the Chesa- 
peake Region, 1.0 million pounds (up 7 percent) 
compared with 1995. The average exvessel price 
per pound for squid was 25 cents in 1 996, compared 
with 24 cents in 1995, 




REVIEW 
PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION 



The NMFS calculation of per capita 
consumption is based on a "disappearance" 
model. The total U.S. supply of imports and 
landings is converted to edible weight and 
decreases in supply such as exports and 
inventories are subtracted out. The remaining total 
is divided by a population value to estimate per 
capita consumption. Data for the model are 
derived primarily from secondary sources and are 
subject to incomplete reporting; changes in 
source data or invalid model assumptions may 
each have a significant effect on the resulting 
calculation. 

U.S. per capita consumption of fish and 
shellfish was 14.8 pounds (edible meat) in 1996. 
This total was 0.2 pounds less than the 1 5.0 pounds 
consumed in 1995. Per capita consumption of 
fresh and frozen products was 10.0 pounds, a the 
same as in 1995: Fresh and frozen finfish 



accounted for 6.4 pounds while fresh and frozen 
shellfish consumption was 3.6 pounds per capita. 
Ihe fresh and frozen finfish includes approximately 
0.9 pounds of farm raised catfish. Consumption of 
canned fishery products was 4.5 pounds per 
capita in 1996, a decrease of 0.2 pounds from 
1 995. Cured fish accounted for 0.3 pounds per 
capita, the same as in previous years. Imports of 
edible seafood made up 57 percent of the 
consumption. 



Per Capita Use . Per capita use is based on the 
supply of fishery products, both edible and non- 
edible (industrial), on a round-weight equivalent 
basis without considering beginning or ending 
stocks, defense purchases, or exports. The per 
capita use of all edible and industrial fishery 
products in 1996 was 62.1 pounds, dov^m 0.6 
pounds compared with 1995. 




^.< 






^'"^m^^ 





REVIEW 

PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 

FRESH AND FROZEN 



FISH FILLETS AND STEAKS . In 1996 the U.S. 
production of raw (uncooked) fish fillets and 
steaks, including blocks, was 398.0 million pounds- 
12.7 million pounds more than the 385.3 million 
pounds in 1995. These fillets and steaks were 
valued at $885.7 million--$44.7 million more than 
1995. Alaska pollock fillets and blocks led all 
species with 1 36.4 million pounds-32 percent of 
the total. Production of groundfish fillets and 
steaks (see Glossary Section-Groundfish) was 220.0 
million pounds compared with 216.7 million pounds 
in 1995. 



FISH STICKS AND PORTIONS . The combined 
production of fish sticks and portions was 279.2 
million pounds valued at $362.3 million compared 
with the 1995 production of 325.3 million pounds 
valued at $430.0 million~a decrease of 46. 1 million 
pounds and $67.7 million. 

The total production of fish sticks 
amounted to 65.2 million pounds valued at $55.8 
million-a dencrease of 8.8 million pounds and 
$17.7 million compared with 1995. The total 
production of fish portions amounted to 214.0 
million pounds valued at $306.5 million - a 



decrease of 37.3 million pounds and $50.0 million 
compared with 1995. 



BREADED SHRIMP . The production of breaded 
Shrimp in 1996 was 108.5 million pounds valued at 
$341 .8 million, compared with the 1995 production 
of 100.5 million pounds valued at $299.4 million. 



FROZEN FISHERY TRADE . In 1996, Stocks Of frozen 
fishery products in cold storage were at a low of 
293.5 million pounds on June 30 and a high of 
374.3 million pounds on January 31 . Cold storage 
holdings of shrimp products were at a high of 43.9 
million pounds on December 31 and a low of 27.5 
million pounds on May 31 . Holdings of saltwater 
fillets and steaks reached a high of 78.5 million 
pounds on January 31 and were at a low of 57.7 
million pounds on September 30. Holdings of 
blocks and slabs were at a high of 60.5 million 
pounds on December 31 and a low of 32.1 million 
pounds on February 28. Surimi and analog 
product holdings reached a high of 28.4 million 
pounds on March 31 and were at a low of 15.7 
million pounds on August 31 . 




REVIEW 

PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 
CANNED FISHERY PRODUCTS 



CANNED FISHERY PRODUCTS . The pack of canned 
fishery products in the 50 states, American Samoa, 
and Puerto Rico was 2.3 billion pounds valued at 
$1 .9 billion-an increase of 354.9 million pounds, and 
$46.9 million compared with the 1995 pack. The 
1996 pack included 1.1 billion pounds valued at $1 .4 
billion for human consumption and 1 .2 billion pounds 
valued at $505.1 million for bolt and animal food. 



million pounds -1.3 million pounds more than the 
64.4 million pounds produced in 1995. Albacore 
tuna comprised 25 percent of the tuna pack in 1 996. 
Lightmeat tuna (bigeye, bluefin, skipjack, and 
yellowfin) comprised the remainder with a pack of 
510.2 million pounds -8.0 million pounds more than 
the 502.2 million pounds packed in 1995. 



CANNED SALMON The 1996 U.S. pack of salmon 
was 197.2 million pounds valued at $284.3 million, 
compared with 243.6 million pounds valued at 
$419.2 million packed in 1995. Alaskan plants 
accounted for 96 percent in quantity and 95 
percent in value of the salmon pack. 



CANNED SARDINES . The pack of Maine sardines 
(small herring) was 17.7 million pounds valued at 
$29.9 million, an increase of 4.1 million pounds and 
$6.2 million compared with 1995. There were 6.2 
million pounds of herring valued at $10.8 million 
packed in 1996 - 605,000 pounds and $1.2 million 
less than the 1995 pack. 



CANNED TUNA The U.S. pack of tuna was 675.8 
million pounds valued at $956.9 million-an increase 
of 9.2 million pounds in quantity and $18.4 million in 
value compared with the 1995 pack. The pack of 
albacore tuna was 165.6 



CANNED CLAMS The 1996 U.S. pack of Clams 
(whole, minced, chowder, juice, and specialties) 
was 129.4 million pounds valued at $1 17.3 million-an 
increase of 147,000 pounds and $4.2 million more in 
value than the pack in 1995. Ihe pack of whole and 
minced clams was 45.9 million pounds~2.9 million 
pounds more than the 1995 pack and accounted 
for 35 percent of the total clam pack. Clam 
chowder and clam juice was 71.6 million pounds 
and made up the majority of the pack. 



CANNED SHRIMP . The U.S. pack of natural shrimp 
was 819,000 pounds valued at $6.1 million-a 
decrease of 93,000 pounds and $588,000 in value 
compared with the 1995 pack. 



OTHER CANNED ITEMS The pack of pet food was 1 .2 
billion pounds valued at $505. 1 million-an increase 
of 386.8 million pounds compared with the 1995 
pack. 




REVIEW 

PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 

INDUSTRIAL FISHERY PRODUCTS 



INDUSTRIAL FISHERY PRODUCTS The value Of the 
domestic production of industrial fishery products 
was $277.8 million-an increase of $31.2 million 
compared with the 1995 value of $246.5 million. 



FISH MEAL . The domestic production of fish and 
shellfish meal was 638.5 million pounds valued at 
$142.2 million-a decrease of 28.7 million pounds, but 
an increase of $20.0 million compared with 1995. 
Menhaden meal production was 418.9 million 
pounds valued at $87. 1 million-a decrease of 31 .6 
million pounds, but an increase of $4.6 million 
compared with 1 995. Menhaden accounted for 66 
percent of the 1996 production of meal. Shellfish 
meal production was 17.6 million pounds-an 
increase of 1.2 million pounds from the 1995 level. 
Tuna and macl<erel meal production was 52.3 million 
pounds-a decrease of 12.3 million pounds from 
1995. Production of unclassified meal (consisting 
mainly of Alaska pollocl< and unclassified fish) was 
149.8 million pounds-an increase of 14.0 million 
pounds compared with 1995. 



FBH SOLUBLES . Domestic production of fish solubles 
was 82.0 million pounds, 7.5 million pounds less than 
the 1995 production. 



FISH OILS . The domestic production of fish oils was 
248.4 million pounds valued at $43.9 million-an 
increase of 6.5 million pounds, and $1.7 million in 
value compared with 1995 production. The 
production of menhaden oil was 246.5 million 
pounds valued at $43.7 million-an increase of 8.4 
million pounds, and $1 .8 million compared with 1995. 
Menhaden oil accounted for 99 percent of the 
volume and value of the total 1996 fish oil 
production. 



OTHER INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS Oyster shell products, 
together with agar-agar, animal feeds, crab and 
clam shells processed for food serving, fish pellets, 
Irish moss extracts, kelp products, dry and liquid 
fertilizers, pearl essence, and mussel shell buttons 
were valued at $85.6 million, compared with $74.3 
million in 1995-an increase of $1 1 .3 million. 




REVIEW 



FOREIGN TRADE IN FISHERY PRODUCTS 



IMPORTS . U.S. imports Of edible fishery products in 
1996 were valued at $6.7 billion, $62.1 million less 
than in 1995. The quantity of edible imports was 3.2 
billion pounds, 103.3 million pounds more than the 
quantity imported in 1995. 

Edible imports consisted of 2.7 billion pounds 
of fresh and frozen products valued at $6.0 billion, 

354.4 million pounds of canned products valued at 
$473.7 million, 67.4 million pounds of cured products 
valued at $131.7 million, 5.1 million pounds of caviar 
and roe products valued at $35.3 million, and 16.0 
million pounds of other products valued at $45.2 
million. 

The quantity of shrimp imported in 1996 was 

582.5 million pounds, 14.7 million pounds less than the 
quantity imported in 1995. Valued at $2.5 billion, 
shrimp imports accounted for 36 percent of the 
value of total edible imports. Imports of fresh and 
frozen tuna were 528.7 million pounds, 32.8 million 
pounds more than the 495.9 million pounds imported 
in 1995. Imports of canned tuna were 193.0 million 
pounds, 22.3 million pounds less than in 1995. 
Imports of fresh and frozen fillets and steaks 
amounted to 476.5 million pounds, a decrease of 1 .0 
million pounds from 1995. Regular and minced block 
imports were 234.2 million pounds, an increase of 
23.9 million pounds from 1995. 

Imports of nonedible fishery products were 
valued at $6.3 billion-an increase of $670.8 million 



compared with 1995. The total value of edible 
and nonedible products was $13.1 billion in 1996, 
$608.7 million more than in 1995 when $12.4 billion of 
fishery products were imported. 



EXPORTS . U.S. exports of edible fishery products 
were 2.1 billion pounds valued at $3.0 billion, an 
increase of 64.9 million pounds, but a decrease of 
$230.0 million when compared with 1995. Fresh and 
frozen items were 1.8 billion pounds valued at $2.3 
billion, an increase of 35.1 million pounds, but a 
decrease of $193.7 million compared with 1995. In 
terms of individual species, fresh and frozen exports 
consisted principally of 277.0 million pounds of 
salmon valued at $469.8 million, 284.7 million pounds 
of surimi valued at $269.8 million and 46.7 million 
pounds of crabs valued at $162.4 million. Canned 
items were 1 55.4 million pounds valued at $223.8 
million. Salmon was the major canned item 
exported, with 95.5 million pounds valued at $154.1 
million. Cured items were 23.2 million pounds valued 
at $41 .9 million. Caviar and roe exports were 1 10.9 
million pounds valued at $450.9 million. 



Exports of nonedible products were valued 
at $5.6 billion compared with $5.0 billion in 1995. 
Exports of fishmeal amounted to 186.4 million pounds 
valued at $52.9 million. The total value of edible and 
nonedible exports was $8.7 billion~an increase of 
$385.3 million compared with 1995. 




U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



U.S. DOMESTIC LANDINGS. BY SPECIES. 1995 AND 1996 (1) 



Species 



Average 
(1991-95) 



Alewives 

Anchovies 

Bluefish 

Bonito 

Butterf ish 

Cod: 

Atlantic 

Pacific 

Croaker 

Cusk 

Flounders : 

Atlantic and Gulf: 

Blackback 

Fluke 

Yellowtail 

Other 

Pacific 

Total 

Groupers 

Haddock 

Hake: 

Pacific (whiting) . 

Red 

White 

Halibut 

Herring, sea: 

Atlantic 

Pacific 

Jack mackerel 

Lingcod 

Mackerel : 

Atlantic 

Chub 

King 

Spanish 

Menhaden: 

Atlantic 

Gulf 

Total 

Mullets 

Ocean perch: 

Atlantic 

acif ic 

Pollock: 

Atlantic 

Alaska 

Rockf ishes 

Sablef ish 

Salmon, Pacific: 
Chinook or king. . . 

Chum or keta 

Pink 

Red or sockeye.... 
Silver or coho.... 

Total 

Sardine, Pacific... 

Scup or porgy 

Sea bass: 

Black 

White 

Sea trout: 

Gray 

Spotted , 

White , 

Sharks: 

Dogfish , 

Other 



Thnu.sanri 
pniinris 

854 
6,788 

624 
6,430 

29,631 

591,399 

16,027 

1.702 



8,823 

19,553 

4,149 

18,060 

372,858 



«23. *i3 



10,491 
877 

390,302 

3,543 

9,434 

44,796 

147,181 

117,479 

4,132 

3,736 

18,727 

18,974 

4,519 

4.896 



806,302 
,040,657 



1,846.959 



22,249 

962 
34,420 

7,152 

2,852,618 

90,119 

65.904 



24,733 
152,496 
444,667 
349,690 

49,179 



I, QgO, 7W 



93,619 
7,221 

2,860 
72 

6,824 

1,859 

201 

52,980 
14,165 



Metric 
tons 

387 
3,079 
3,801 

283 
2,917 

13,441 

268,257 

7,270 

772 



111 
1,193 
2,855 

267 
3,186 

28,184 

109,680 

5,855 

1.033 



Thousand 
pounds 

975 
9,933 
9,356 

1,339 
9,685 

31,422 

605,314 

20,483 

1.031 



Metri c 
tons 

442 
4,506 
4,244 

607 
4,393 

14,253 

274,569 

9,291 

468 



198 
988 

3, 166 
425 

5,847 

26,634 

111,978 

7,386 

664 



4,002 
8,869 
1,882 
8,192 
169, 127 



12,661 
34,763 
5,887 
23,933 
72,995 



192.072 



150.239 



4,759 
398 

177, 040 

1,607 

4,279 

20,319 

66,761 

53,288 

1,874 

1,695 

8,495 
8,607 
2,050 
2.221 



22,605 

1, 207 

18, 002 

996 

6,111 

66,781 

8,654 

49,245 

279 

1,782 

2,759 

1,130 
6,060 

2. 162 



365,736 
472,039 



47,247 
51,884 



837. 775 



436 
15,613 

3,244 

1,293,939 

40,878 

29.894 



14,725 

608 
4,660 

6,602 

259,614 

41,125 

123.694 



11,219 

69,172 

201,700 

158,618 

22,307 



34,439 
45,345 
67,522 
312,294 
26,507 



<«, OJg 



486.107 



42,465 
3,275 



3,095 
843 



24,032 
6, 425 



5,083 
6,646 

3,739 

161 

4,124 

2,195 

121 

9,516 

10,534 



12,537 

16,793 

5,297 

14,862 

410,038 



5,687 
7,617 
2,403 
6,741 
185,992 



15,421 
28,027 
7,639 
20,926 
82,036 



459. 527 



208. 440 



1S4. 049 



9,703 
1,257 

430, 537 

2,397 

7,252 

49,092 

197,124 

120,434 

4,798 

4,972 

34,801 

21,994 

4,560 

3. 406 



4,401 
570 

195,290 

1,087 

3,289 

22,268 

89,415 

54,629 

2,176 

2,255 

15,786 
9,976 
2,068 
1.545 



22,409 
1,494 

17,031 

695 

4,553 

83,468 

11,194 

69,747 

296 

2,277 

4,624 
1,336 
5,880 
1.778 



671,664 
,083,807 



304,665 
491,612 



39,677 
54,473 



1, 755,471 



94.150 



720 
46,305 

6,529 

2,623,131 

94,760 

59.949 



327 

21,004 

2,962 

1,189,844 

42,983 

27.193 



477 
6, 171 

4,543 

238,129 

39,049 

109.009 



20,463 
180,573 
309,839 
318,443 

47,738 



9,282 

81,907 
140,542 
144,445 

21,654 



23,470 
29,442 
26,723 
266,422 
22,672 



877. 056 



397.no 



368. 729 



71,657 
6,895 

4,361 

101 

7,189 

1,066 

168 

65,342 

15,345 



32,503 
3,128 



,978 
46 



3,261 
484 



29,639 
6,960 



3,053 
7,330 



4,751 
193 



4,839 
1,155 



11,804 
10,824 



Thousand 
pounds 



2,237 

11,566 

10,721 

2, 012 

8,181 

54,541 

527,746 

9,340 

2.804 



11,743 

18,532 

9,694 

22,220 

437,849 



500. 038 



11,716 
2,541 

287,480 

3,873 

13,851 

60,133 

117,577 

123,817 

4,137 

5,433 

22,328 

14,788 

23,918 

5.452 



731,540 
,223,503 



1. 955. 043 



1,347 
37,257 

12,215 

,008,517 

105,004 

74.754 



20, 044 
131,958 
343,907 
332,960 

56,281 



885.149 



42,525 
11,596 

3,775 
106 

7,218 

2,359 

285 

45,335 
15,070 



See notes at end of table. 



(Continued) 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



U.S. DOMESTIC LANDINGS, BY SPECIES. 1995 AND 1996 (1) ■ Continued 



Species 



Fi55h - Cnntiniied: 

napper : 

Red 

Other 

Striped bass 

Swordf ish 

Tilefish 

Tuna: 

Albacore 

Bigeye 

Bluef in 

Skipjack 

Yellowf in 

Unclassified. . . . 



Total . 



Whiting 

Other marine 

f inf ishes 

Other freshwater 
f inf ishes 



Total, fish. . . 
Shellfish, et al. 
Clams: 

Hard 

Ocean quahog. ... 

Soft 

Surf 

Other 



Total 

Crabs: 

Blue, hard. . . . 

Dungeness 

King 

Snow (tanner) , 
Other , 



Total 

Lobsters : 

American 

Spiny 

Oysters 

Scallops 

Bay 

Calico 

Sea 

Shrimp: 

New England 

South Atlantic... 

Gulf 

Pacific 

Other 



Total 

Squid: 

Atlantic 

Pacific 

Other shellfish 

Total, aballflab 
at al 

Grand total 



Thousand Metri c 
pounds tons 



3,645 
5,951 
3,624 
13,043 
2,832 

17,208 

6,787 

3,414 

17,047 

18,553 

855 



63. 864 



33,548 
378,834 



B.520.0B6 



17,812 
49,006 

2,434 
63,345 

1,627 



134.224 



201,545 
47,830 
14,673 
80,817 
18,774 



363. 639 



66,406 

7,123 

40,380 

253 

957 

18,316 

14,383 

39,369 

219,823 

33,241 

53 



306. 86B 



74,248 

155,280 

99,773 



1.267.468 



9, 787. 554 



1,653 
2,699 
1,644 
5,916 
1,285 

7,805 
3,079 
1,549 
7,732 
8,416 
388 



Thnus^gnd 
dol T ars 

8,356 
12,223 

5,584 
37,270 

5,002 

14,284 
25, 613 
25, 639 
6,808 
29,835 
459 



pounds 



4,422 
5,235 
4,712 
12,879 
3,226 

34, 053 
6,254 
12, 148 
14,717 
17,484 
783 



2,006 
2,375 
2,137 
5,842 
1,463 

15,446 
2,837 

5,510 

6,676 

7,931 

355 



9,529 
10,155 

8,021 
36,494 

5,356 

30,157 
23,673 
21,857 
7,084 
27,060 
425 



28. 969 



102. 638 



85.439 



38. 755 



110.256 



35,400 



13,494 



3.864.686 1.915.642 



a. 272. 709 



3.752.476 1.790.966 



8,079 
22,229 

1, 104 

28,733 

738 



67,405 
20,714 
11,112 
39,035 
2, 148 



9,990 
46,460 

2,200 
63,438 

1, 151 



4,531 
21,074 

998 
28,775 

522 



49,346 

20,552 

8,253 

38,220 
11,428 



eO. 884 



140.414 



123.239 



55.901 



li7. 799 



91,420 
21,696 

6,656 
36,658 

8,516 



144,668 
79,562 
45,457 

202,392 
39, 908 



218,960 
64,988 
21,000 
67,867 
18, 982 



99,320 
29,478 

9,526 
30,784 

8, 610 



147,061 
87,858 
62,560 
93,249 
35,977 



164.946 



511. 9B7 



391. 797 



177.718 



«g. 79? 



30,122 

3,231 

18,316 

115 

434 

8,308 

6,524 

17,858 

99,711 

15,078 

24 



214,838 

34, 176 

101,574 

538 

1,219 

92,826 

12,803 

91, 131 

437,444 

28,387 

269 



71,641 

8,308 

38,007 



18,162 

20,978 

40,437 

218,559 

36,867 

38 



32,496 
3,768 

17,240 



8,238 

9,516 
18,342 
99,138 
16,723 

17 



241,796 

35,227 

114,839 



101,823 

15,162 

66,366 

401,354 

26, 155 

166 



139.195 



570. 034 



316.879 



143. 735 



509. 203 



33,679 
70,435 
45,257 



33,269 
22,660 
96,438 



65,248 

174,785 

84,078 



29, 596 
79,282 
38,138 



28,514 

31,712 
78,035 



57<. 920 



1. 819. 973 



1.292.179 



586. 129 



1.695.747 



4, 439, 60S 



3, 735, 615 



9, 564, 888 



4, 338, 605 3, 486, 713 



(1) Landings are reported in round (live) weight for all items except univalve and bivalve mollusks such as clams, 
oysters, and scallops, which are reported in weight of meats (excluding the shell) . Landings for Mississippi 
River Drainage area States are not available. 



Note: — Data are preliminary. Data do not include landings by U.S. -flag vessels at Puerto Rico and other ports 
outside the 50 States, or catches by U.S. -flag vessels transferred to internal water processing vessels (IWPs) 
U.S. waters. Data do not include aquaculture products, except oysters and clams. 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



DISPOSITION OF U.S. DOMESTIC LANDINGS, 1995 AND 1996 



End Use 


1995 


1996 1 


Million 


Percent 


Million 


Percent 




pounds 




pounds 




Fresh and frozen: 










For human food 


6,871 


70.2 


6,752 


995.9 


For bait and 










animal food 

Total 

Canned: 


228 


2.3 


302 


3.2 


7.099 


72.5 


7 054 


73.7 










For human food 


706 


7.2 


629 


6.6 


For bait and 










animal food 

Total 

Cured for human food 


63 


0.6 


49 


0.5 


769 


7.9 


678 


7.1 


90 


0.9 


93 


1.0 












oil, etc 


1,830 


18.7 


1,740 


18.2 


Grand total 


9, 7sa 


100.0 


9,565 


100.0 



-Data are preliminary. Table may not add due to rounding. 



DISPOSITION OF U.S. DOMESTIC LANDINGS, BY MONTH, 1996 



Landings for 
Human food 



Landings for Industrial 
purposes (1) 



Total 



Mi n ion 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Total 

(1) Processed into meal 




Percent 



6. 
9. 

10. 

13, 

10. 

4, 

3. 



7,475 



Mi 1 1 ion 



100.0 



26 

18 

26 

95 

258 

334 

233 

327 

374 

213 

138 

48 



1.2 

0.9 

1.2 

4.5 

12.3 

16.0 

11.1 

15.6 

17.9 

10.2 

6.6 

2.3 



2,090 



100.0 



Percent 



nds 
407 


4.3 


1,071 


11.2 


652 


6.8 


555 


5.8 


874 


9.1 


849 


8.9 


954 


10.0 


1,102 


11.5 


1,385 


14.5 


981 


10.3 


440 


4.6 


295 


3.1 



9,565 



100.0 



oil, solubles, and shell products, or used as bait and animal food. 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS OF FISH AND SHELLFISH, 1987-1996 (1) 



Landings for 
Human food 



Landings for Industrial 
purposes (1) 



1987. 
1988. 
1989. 
1990. 
1991. 
1992. 
1993. 
1994. 
1995. 
1996. 



Million 
pounds 

3,946 
4,588 
6,204 
7,041 
7,031 
7,618 
*8,214 
7,936 
7,667 
7,475 



Mi 1 1 ion 
dol lars 

2,979 
3,362 
3,111 
3,366 
3,169 
3,531 
3,317 
3,714 
3,625 
3,355 



Mi 1 1 ions 



2,950 
2,604 
2,259 
2,363 
2,453 
2,019 
2,253 
2,525 
2,121 
2,090 



Mi 1 1 ion 
dol lars 



136 
158 
127 
156 
139 
147 
154 
95 
145 
132 



Mi 1 1 ions 



6,896 
7,192 
8,463 
9,404 
9,484 
9,637 
10,467 
10,461 
9,788 
9,565 



Million 

dol lars 

3, 115 
3,520 
3,238 
3,522 
3,308 
3,678 
3,471 
3,809 
3,770 
3,487 



(1) Statistics on landings are shown in round weight for all items except univalve and bivalve 
mollusks such as clams, oysters, and scallops, which are shown in weight of meats (excluding the 
shell). All data are preliminary. (2) Processed into meal, oil, solubles, and shell products, 
or used as bait or animal food. * Record. Record — 1983 industrial purposes, 3,201 million lb. 
NOTE: — Data do not include landings outside the 50 States or products of aquaculture, except 
oysters and clams. 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



U.S. DOMESTIC LANDINGS, BY STATES. 1995 AND 1996 (1) 



Record Landings 



Alabama 

Alaska 

California 

Connecticut . . . . 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi . . . . 
New Hampshire.. 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina. 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . . . 
Rhode Island. . . 
South Carolina. 

Texas 

Virginia 

Washington 

Wisconsin 



Thousand 
pounds 

28,741 

5,293,445 

432,520 

21,914 

10,108 

133,483 

20,341 

29,892 

235 

1,025 

1,110,220 

231,804 

68,030 

204,255 

14,331 

497 

145,468 

12,763 

177, 177 

53,210 

184,664 

4,722 

238,764 

506 

121, 929 

24, 162 

94,674 

777,602 

343,038 

8,034 



Thousand 



49,656 

1,396,974 

166,522 

56,705 

7,858 

198,067 

35,268 

59,847 

444 

2,225 

290,576 

216,546 

60,570 

224,361 

10,143 

236 

41,735 

14,923 

95,479 

76,501 

110,884 

2,639 

77,766 

496 

68,422 

37,669 

198,876 

113,659 

115,429 

5, 139 



Thousand 
pounds 

26,579 

5,012,875 

460,681 

20,949 

5,958 

134,038 

13,117 

31,870 

202 

303 

1, 130,639 

236,567 

69,179 

236,550 

14, 174 

584 

160,283 

11,047 

179,306 

56,732 

193,828 

4,258 

264, 113 

311 

136,708 

15,788 

91,593 

659,651 

391,741 

5,264 



Thousand 
dol 1ars 

38,342 

1,190,576 

187,461 

48,409 

4,397 

205,203 

21,114 

64,288 

415 

736 

267,286 

200,930 

52,720 

231,380 

9,228 

221 

32,782 

13,531 

94,026 

83,527 

110,057 

1,984 

84, 186 

274 

69,919 

24,067 

190,860 

106,016 

148,285 

4,493 



Year 

1973 
1993 
1936 
1930 
1953 
1938 
1927 
1993 



1984 
1950 
1890 
1948 
1930 

1985 

1956 
1880 
1981 
1936 
1992 

1957 
1965 
1960 
1990 
1994 



Thousand 
pounds 



36, 
5,905, 
1,760, 

88, 
367, 
241, 

47, 

34, 
(2) 
(2) 
1,931, 
356, 
141, 
649, 

35, 

(2) 
439, 

(2) 
540, 
335, 
432, 

31, 
256, 

(2) 
142, 

26, 
237, 
786, 
527, 

(2) 



744 
638 
193 
012 
500 
443 
607 
582 



027 
266 
607 
696 
580 

518 

060 
000 
006 
083 
912 

080 
611 
684 
794 
804 



Total . 



9,787,554 3, 735, €15 



9, 564, 888 3, 486, 713 



(1) Landings are reported in round { 
mollusks such as clams, oysters, and 
the shell) . Landings for Mississippi 

(2) Data not available. 

NOTE: — Data are preliminary. Data do 
and other ports outside the 50 States 
water processing vessels (IWPs) in U. 
except oysters and clams. 



live) weight for all items except univalve and bivalve 
scallops, which are reported in weight of meats (excluding 
River Drainage Area States are not available. 

not include landings by U.S. -flag vessels at Puerto Rico 
or catches by U.S. -flag vessels transferred to internal 
S. waters. Data do not include aquaculture products. 



U.S. DOMESTIC LANDINGS, BY REGIONS, 1995 AND 1996 (1) 



Region 



1996 



New England 

Middle Atlantic. 

Chesapeake 

South Atlantic. . 

Gulf 

Pacific Coast 
and Alaska. . . . 

Great Lakes 

Hawaii 

Total 



Thousand 



592,665 
240,413 
845,632 
277,035 
464,718 



307,767 
29,432 
29,892 



Thousand 



580,957 
179,747 
174,229 
238,112 
724,619 

1,756,691 
21,413 
59,847 



Thousand 
pounds 

641,821 
241,936 
728,830 
268,990 
1,496,875 

6,129,410 
25, 156 
31,870 



9, 787, 554 



3, 735, 615 



Thousand 
dol lars 

564, 169 
181,869 
158,736 
209,407 
680,304 

1,610,508 
17,432 
64,288 



9, 564, 888 3, 486. 713 



(1) Landings are reported in round (live) weight for all items except univalve and bivalve 
mollusks such as clams, oysters, and scallops, which are reported in weight of meats (exclud 
the shell). Landings for Mississippi River Drainage Area States are not available. 



ing 



NOTE: — Data are preliminary. Data do not include landings by U.S. -flag vessels at Puerto Rico 
and other ports outside the 50 States, or catches by U.S. -flag vessels transferred to internal 
water processing vessels (IWPs) in U.S. waters. Data do not include aquaculture products, 
except oysters and clams. 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



COMMERCIAL FISHERY LANDINGS AND VALUE AT MAJOR U.S. PORTS. 1994-1996 



Dutch Harbor, AK 

Empire-Venice, LA 

Cameron, LA 

Seattle, WA 

Kodiak, AK 

Intercoastal City, LA 

Morgan City-Berwick, LA... 

Los Angeles, CA 

Pascagoula-Moss Point, MS. 
Ketchikan, AK 



Port Hueneme-Oxnard-Ventura, CA. 

Newport, OR 

Astoria, OR 

Petersburg, AK 

Cape May-Wildwood, NJ 

Point Judith, RI 

Portland, ME 

Beaufort-Morehead City, NC 

New Bedford, MA 

Gloucester, MA 



Cordova, AK 

Rockland, ME 

Westport, WA 

Wanchese-Stumpy Point, NC. 

Valdez, AK 

Atlantic City, NJ 

Dulac-Chauvin, LA 

Kenai, AK 

Sitka, Ak 

Seward, AK 



Crescent City, CA 

Moss Landings, CA 

Wrangell, AK 

Monterery, CA 

Coos Bay-Charleston, OR 

Ilwaco-Chinook, WA 

Key West, FL 

iHonolulu, HI 

Point Pleasant, NJ 

Brownsville-Port Isabel, 



Homer, AK 

Belllngham, WA 

Cape Canaveral, FL 

Galveston, TX 

Bayou La Batre, AL 

San Francisco Area, CA. 

Eureka, CA 

Newport , RI 

Provincetown-Chatham, ^ 
Englehard-Swanquarter, 



NC. 



Belhaven-Washington, NC... 
Golden Meadow-Leevllle, LA. 

Oriental-Vandemere, NC 

Grand Isle, LA 

Aransas Pass-Rockport, TX.. 

Brookings, OR 

Blaine, WA 

Port Arthur, TX 

Anacortes-La Conner, WA. . . . 
Hampton Roads Area, VA 



Million Pounds - - 



579.6 
316.5 
315.7 
241.2 
202.7 
199.0 
162.9 
157.6 
148.0 
136.8 

134.5 

115.0 

107.0 

105.0 

82.7 

79.0 

78.3 

75.4 

66.0 



699.6 


684.6 




431.7 


298.1 




401.8 


280.0 




391.8 


229.0 




307.7 


362.4 




304.8 


179.2 




243.6 


127.4 




98.2 


168.5 




200.9 


128.6 




93.6 


116.7 




68.3 


116.8 




122.2 


112.0 




78.9 


89.0 




126.3 


83.0 




85.3 


75.4 




61.9 


89.6 




63.9 


66.7 




97.0 


87.0 




65.8 


70.5 




50.1 


61.3 




60.8 


42.5 




33.8 


44.5 




27.0 


24.0 




39.0 


39.0 




9.5 


29.5 




42.8 


42.3 




217.0 


123.3 




44.3 


35.0 




32.4 


31.0 




30.7 


24.4 




28.4 


21.8 




14.3 


13.4 




18.4 


17.2 




27.6 


18.6 




24.0 


21.0 




24.0 


18.0 




21.5 


23.4 




19.1 


22.1 




37.0 


22.7 




21.0 


16.0 




19.2 


23.3 




27.0 


27.0 




19.5 


10.1 




12.4 


17.0 




18.3 


22.1 




10.9 


15.7 




18.4 


15.1 




12.1 


13.2 




18.6 


18.4 




14.0 


11.0 




11.0 


10.0 




17.2 


18.7 




10.0 


9.0 




9.6 


12.6 




13.0 


12.0 




10.6 


6.0 




16.0 


12.0 




8.7 


6.0 





Million Dollars - 



7.0 
10.8 



55.4 
52.7 
45.6 



32.0 
29.2 



25.3 
25.1 
24.9 
24.0 
23.9 
23.7 
23.6 
22.1 
22.0 

21.8 
21.4 
21.2 
21.0 
20.4 
19.1 
18.0 
18.0 
15.2 
15.0 



14.0 
13.9 
13.0 
13.0 
12.3 
12.0 



Dutch Harbor, AK 

New Bedford, MA 

Kodiak, AK 

Key West, FL 

Brownsville-Port Isabel, TX. 

Honolulu, HI 

Point Judith, RI 

Empire-Venice, LA 

Dulac-Chauvin, LA 

Portland, ME 



Galveston, TX 

Los Angeles, CA 

Petersburg, AK 

Port Hueneme-Oxnard-Ventura, CA. 

Sitka, Ak 

Kenai, AK 

Westport, WA 

Cape May-Wildwood, NJ 

Cameron, LA 

Bayou La Batre, AL 



Astoria, OR 

Cordova, AK 

Port Arthur, TX 

Seward, AK 

Palacios, TX 

Newport, OR 

Wanchese-Stumpy Point, 
Aransas Pass-Rockport, 
Hampton Roads Area, VA. 
Ketchikan, AK 



Golden Meadow-Leeville, LA... 

Atlantic City, NJ 

Seattle, WA 

Beaufort-Morehead City, NC... 

San Francisco Area, CA 

Tampa Bay-St . Petersburg, FL. 

Fort Myers , FL 

Homer , AK 

Gloucester, MA 

Gulf port, MS 



Grand Isle, LA 

Cape Canaveral, FL 

Crescent City, CA 

Delcambre, LA 

Coos Bay-Charleston, OR. 
Morgan City-Berwick, LA. . 

Apalachicola, FL 

Bellingham, WA 

Freeport, TX 

Oriental-Vandemere, NC... 



Point Pleasant, NJ.. 

Shelton, WA 

Ilwaco-Chinook, WA.. 

Eureka, CA 

Newport , RI 

Valdez, AK 

Poulsbo, WA 

Belhaven-Washington, 
Intercoastal City, I 
Brookings, OR 



43.4 
26.7 



33.8 
33.9 



23.6 
23.1 
16.6 
24.5 
19.0 
22.0 
29.3 
26.2 
29.1 



146.2 
86.9 

105.4 
66.7 
66.0 
46.7 
43.7 
51.1 
53.4 
39.4 



38.0 
27.0 
44.8 
26.8 
32.4 
25.3 



30.5 
27.8 



24.3 
21.0 
22.0 
25.0 
33.0 
26.6 
33.6 



22.2 
20.3 
35.0 
15.4 
18.2 
15.9 
16.3 
23.2 
23.3 



22.4 


10.2 


17.0 


15.0 


19.6 


15.0 


10.0 


10.0 


15.3 


11.8 


10.0 


12.0 


11.0 


10.0 


13.0 


10.3 


12.1 


11.4 


2.3 


10.7 


(1) 


6.0 


7.0 


6.0 


16.3 


10.1 



(1) Not available 

* Record value landed: 1960 record quantity ot 848.2 million lb in Los Angeles, CA. 
Notes:-To avoid disclosure of private enterprise certain leading ports have not been included. Seattle landings include fish caught by at-sea processing vessels. 



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14 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



DOMESTIC LANDINGS FOR U.S. TERRITORIAL POSSESSIONS, 1996 (1) 



Species 



Puerto Rico 



Elsh 



Pounds 



Amberjack 

Ballyhoo 

Barracuda 

Dolphinfish 

Emperors , 

Goatf ish , 

Groupers 

Grouper, red hind 

Grunts 

Hogf ish 

Jacks, unclassified.... 
Mackerel, king and cero 

Margate 

Marlin 

Mo jarra 

Mullet (black or silver; 

Nassau grouper 

Parrotf ish 

Reef fish 

Sailfish 

Scup or porgy 

Scad, bigeye 

Sharks, other 

Snappers : 

Ehu 

Lane 

Lehi 

Mutton 

Onaga 

Opakapakas 

Silk 

Yellowtail 

Other 



Total anappara. 

Snook 

Spanish sardine 

Squirrelfish 

Surgeonf ishes 

Tarpon 

Triggerf ish 

Trunkfish (boxfish) . 
Tuna: 

Skipjack 

Yellowf in 

Unclassified 



Total tuna. 



41,500 

17,700 

107,800 

14,300 
68,800 
43,200 

119,200 
47,500 
56,300 

131,900 



19,200 
48,500 
10,800 
62, 100 



20,300 

41, 500 



231,900 
60,000 



262,600 

205,900 

45,000 



805, 400 



36,400 
26,000 
14,400 

100 
54,300 
47,500 



167, 80C 



167,800 



Dol lars 



Pounds 



37,400 

22,700 

158,500 

19,400 
117,600 

82,100 
165,700 

86,500 

67,600 
189,900 



23,800 
54,300 
16,800 
84,500 



26,400 
47,300 



403,500 

102,000 



590,900 

358,300 

83,300 



1,538,000 



(2) 



52,100 
28,600 
16,000 



74,400 
86,500 



209, 8C 



209, 800 



127 



1,454 

77,368 

2,098 

66 

577 



1,352 



32,807 



2,442 
23,692 

1,053 

961 
59 



li 
136 



66 
272 



1,397 



1,889 



1,524 



37,828 
33,696 

1,571 



73, 095 



(Continued on next page) 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



15 



DOMESTIC LANDINGS FOR U.S. TERRITORIAL POSSESSIONS, 1996 (1) 



species 



Puerto Rico 



Wahoo 

Other marine finfishes 
Freshwater fish, other 

Total, fish 

ShallflBh 

Crabs, other 

Lobster, spiny 

Conch (snail) meats... 

Oysters 

Octopus 

Other shellfish 

Total, shmllflBh, 
at al 

Grand total 

Species 



175,700 



2,178,200 



8,400 

195,700 

131,800 

11,300 

30,200 

6,700 



3B4, 100 



2, 562, 300 



Hoi lars 



185,000 



3, 390, 900 



34,400 
759, 300 
200,300 
24,900 
52,900 
18,700 



1, 090, SOO 



4, 481, 400 



41,304 
4,805 



266,673 



405 



267, 078 



Pol lars 



84,965 
9,432 



461, 811 



1,258 



463, 069 



American Samoa 



Northern Marianas 
Islands 



Elsh 



Amberjack 

Barracuda 

Dolphinfish 

Emperors 

Goatfish 

Groupers 

Jacks, unclassified.... 

Marlin 

Mullet (black or silver; 

Parrotfish 

Reef fish 

Sailfish 

Scad, bigeye 

Sharks, other 

Snappers : 

Ehu 

Lehi 

Onaga 

Opakapakas 

Yellowtail 

Other 



2,760 
3,405 
3,639 

1,381 

5,477 



Total Bnapp0TB. 



16,662 





Del lars 


82 


164 


3,996 


6,539 


11,497 


22,810 


10,627 


19,957 


7,099 


13,447 


3,033 


5,697 


30,042 


33,955 


17,483 


32,758 


15,190 


28,527 


4,252 


4,252 



5,771 
6,804 
7,584 
2,673 

10,433 



243 

35,655 

11,531 

26,625 

6,042 

1,697 

7,040 

171 

6,427 

L08,223 

681 

4,000 



2,566 

13,892 

4,379 

2,090 



33, 265 



22, 927 



Pol lars 



438 

68,049 

30,706 

49,219 

16,657 

4,705 

11,765 

427 

16,459 

230,069 

1,361 

10,739 



9,886 
60,346 
12,217 

6,604 



89, 053 



(Continued on next page) 



16 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



DOMESTIC LANDINGS FOR U.S. TERRITORIAL POSSESSIONS, 1996(1) 



Species 



American Samoa 



Northern Marianas 
Islands 



Elfib 



Squirrelf ish . . . 
Surgeonf ishes . . 
Triggerf ish. . . . 
Tuna: 

Albacore 

Bigeye 

Skipjack 

Yellowf in . . . . 

Unclassified. 



Total tuna . 



Wahoo 

Other marine finfishes 
Freshwater fish, other.. 



Total, f±eh 

Shallflah 

Crabs, other 

Lobster, spiny.... 

Shrimp 

Octopus 

Other shellfish. . . 

Total, Bhallfiah, 

at al 



Grand total . 



Pounds 



2,063 
17, 960 



232,460 

10,005 

69,753 

91,248 

6,008 



409,474 



10,859 
6,450 



5€€, 769 



39 
2,790 



312 
4 



3,145 



569, 914 



Hoi Tars 



Pounds 



3,845 
33,376 



257,435 
20,009 
69,753 

179,305 

11, 148 



537, €50 



11,210 
14,552 



B02, 004 



119 
9,727 



593 

15 



10, 454 



612, 458 



9,561 
7,208 



164,881 
37,772 
14,380 



217,033 



10,111 
17,005 



492, 160 



3,830 



179 
149 



4,158 



496, 336 



Hoi Tars 



17,709 
17,939 



303,778 
77,868 
29,213 



410, 659 



23, 2( 
39,865 



1,039,287 



17, 388 



939 

744 



19, 071 



1,056,358 



(1) Data in this table are preliminary and represent the latest information available. 

(2) Less than $1.00. 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



17 




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r- <— 1 "nt cs^ "^ 


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rc 


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LO r- CM <^ 


t-H ro r- cTi 


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co oM CO rH en 


rH CM r^ Ovj rH 


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c 


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CM (^ CD en in 


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CD 


Sh 
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SH 


m 


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4-1 


4-1 


T 


m 


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IH 


C 


4-1 


Tl 


r/l 


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m 








t) 




P 


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ClH 


(1) 


(11 


C) 


c 






3 


ro 

P 


ro 


(0 


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^^ 


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to 


4-1 


Ch 


(11 


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SH 


C, 


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t) 


(11 




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T) 


to 


h 


(0 


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20 



COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



SUMMARY OF COMMERCIAL SWORDFISH LANDINGS, BY STATE, 1950-96 



Year 


Maine 


Massachusetts 


Rhode 


Island 




Thousand 


.Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 




Pounds 


Dollars, 


Pounds 


OoUars. 


Pounds, 


Dollars, 


1950.. . 


(2) 


(2) 


824 


293 


58 


30 


1951. . . 


- 


- 


144 


63 


55 


33 


1952. . . 


- 


- 


213 


70 


87 


42 


1953. . . 


- 


- 


201 


66 


41 


15 


1954. . . 


- 


- 


207 


62 


135 


43 


1955... 


- 


- 


298 


88 


54 


18 


1956. . . 


- 


- 


367 


126 


79 


26 


1957.. . 


- 


- 


648 


211 


135 


47 


1958... 


- 


- 


1,155 


335 


283 


84 


1959.. . 


1 


(2) 


1,178 


304 


206 


60 


1960. . . 


1 


(2) 


713 


289 


211 


84 


1961.. . 


6 


2 


694 


268 


128 


49 


1962.. . 


52 


21 


703 


307 


109 


48 


1963. . . 


445 


101 


1,717 


431 


169 


45 


1964. . . 


241 


84 


1,149 


326 


65 


21 


1965.. . 


210 


82 


550 


210 


28 


13 


1966. . . 


171 


73 


683 


272 


1 


(2) 


1967. . . 


88 


30 


514 


205 


39 


15 


1968... 


89 


39 


264 


134 


37 


20 


1969. . . 


109 


46 


208 


108 


18 


8 


1970. . . 


53 


28 


209 


131 


6 


4 


1971. . . 


- 


- 


73 


71 


- 


- 


1972... 


- 


- 


(2) 


604 


124 


152 


1973. .. 


(2) 


1 


811 


1,148 


62 


100 


1974. . . 


119 


118 


2,898 


2,682 


336 


480 


1975. .. 


146 


198 


3,389 


4,169 


754 


942 


1976.. . 


611 


825 


2,459 


3,267 


338 


510 


1977. . . 


380 


460 


2,436 


3,177 


81 


118 


1978.. . 


790 


1,186 


4,132 


5,307 


668 


913 


1979. . . 


417 


631 


3,828 


5,701 


585 


814 


1980... 


649 


1,190 


2,636 


4,675 


514 


900 


1981. .. 


603 


1,339 


1,937 


4,036 


636 


1,213 


1982.. . 


468 


1,145 


2,718 


7,075 


411 


1,040 


1983. . . 


337 


682 


2,650 


7,007 


289 


827 


1984.. . 


349 


926 


3,001 


8,430 


89 


275 


1985. . . 


125 


318 


2,937 


7,058 


250 


581 


1986. . . 


145 


394 


2, 186 


6,751 


126 


380 


1987. . . 


341 


1,047 


2,682 


8,827 


119 


470 


1988. .. 


310 


894 


4,136 


12,164 


58 


231 


1989. . . 


395 


1,070 


3,620 


10,553 


504 


1,502 


1990. . . 


203 


570 


2,656 


7,725 


369 


1,008 


1991. . . 


335 


996 


1,811 


5,214 


141 


416 


1992. . . 


265 


723 


1,777 


4,852 


51 


169 


1993. . . 


468 


1,394 


1,596 


4,348 


30 


103 


1994. . . 


274 


787 


1,412 


4, 174 


41 


153 


1995. . . 


81 


280 


1,750 


4,622 


85 


302 


1996. . . 


167 


427 


- 


- 


83 


332 



See footnotes at end of table. 



COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



21 



SUMMARY OF COMMERCIAL SWORDFISH LANDINGS, BY STATE, 1950-96 - Continued 



Year 


New 


York 


New Jersey 


Maryl 


and 




Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 




Pounds, 


Do! lars 


Pounds 


Dol Isrs 


Pounds 


Dollars, 


1950. . . 


24 


12 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1951. . . 


2 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1952... 


1 


1 


(2) 


(2) 


- 


- 


1953... 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1954... 


3 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1955. .. 


2 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1956... 


14 


7 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1957... 


13 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1958... 


84 


41 


13 


4 


- 


- 


1959. .. 


100 


40 


25 


10 


- 


- 


I960.. . 


49 


28 


20 


9 


- 


- 


1961. . . 


49 


22 


23 


12 


- 


- 


1962. . . 


41 


22 


26 


16 


- 


- 


1963.. . 


47 


17 


193 


90 


- 


- 


1964.. . 


171 


58 


307 


103 


- 


- 


1965... 


88 


30 


1,001 


438 


- 


- 


1966. . . 


83 


35 


253 


120 


- 


- 


1967... 


2 


1 


257 


86 


- 


- 


1968. . . 


57 


27 


73 


29 


- 


- 


1969. . . 


3 


1 


31 


13 


- 


- 


1970. . . 


18 


10 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1971... 


4 


2 


(2) 


(2) 


- 


- 


1972... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1973... 


- 


- 


5 


5 


- 


- 


1974. . . 


1 


1 


7 


12 


- 


- 


1975.. . 


- 


- 


122 


225 


- 


- 


1976. . . 


- 


- 


163 


268 


- 


- 


1977... 


27 


37 


189 


359 


(2) 


(2) 


1978. . . 


60 


103 


402 


592 


- 


- 


1979. . . 


112 


222 


293 


415 


(2) 


(2) 


1980. . . 


180 


541 


1,394 


2,323 


74 


145 


1981... 


135 


377 


114 


292 


536 


1,050 


1982. . . 


373 


1,244 


472 


1,177 


593 


1,289 


1983... 


428 


1,375 


676 


1,645 


561 


1,251 


1984... 


537 


2,177 


997 


2,885 


438 


1,090 


1985.. . 


295 


956 


587 


1,531 


233 


620 


1986.. . 


617 


1,959 


859 


2,417 


402 


1,102 


1987. . . 


531 


1,885 


655 


2,328 


337 


1,159 


1988.. . 


503 


1,504 


824 


2,650 


185 


570 


1989... 


344 


992 


844 


2,535 


169 


489 


1990. . . 


367 


980 


1,313 


3,893 


173 


553 


1991. . . 


421 


1,351 


1,103 


3,380 


139 


468 


1992.. . 


452 


1,443 


800 


2,436 


97 


306 


1993... 


380 


1,245 


682 


2,063 


153 


488 


1994. . . 


248 


826 


603 


1,969 


143 


481 


1995... 


271 


893 


315 


1,090 


127 


429 


1996. . . 


136 


451 


245 


802 


- 


- 



See footnotes at end of table. 



22 



COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



SUMMARY OF COMMERCIAL SWORDFISH LANDINGS. BY STATE, 1950-96 ■ Continued 



Year 


Virginia 


North Ca 


rolina 


South Carolina 




Thousand 
Pounds 


Thousand 
Dollars. 


Thousand 
Pounds 


Thousand 
Dol lars 


Thousand 
Pounds 


Thousand 

Dollars 


1950. . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1951. . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1952. . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1953. . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1954... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1955. . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1956. . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1957. . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1958.. . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1959. .. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1960. . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1961... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1962. . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1963. . . 


183 


79 


1 


1 


- 


- 


1964.. . 


635 


218 


483 


233 


- 


- 


1965. . . 


302 


112 


524 


283 


- 


- 


1966. . . 


89 


41 


77 


38 


- 


- 


1967.. . 


145 


72 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1968... 


86 


50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1969.. . 


7 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1970. . . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


1971.. . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1972... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1973. . . 


2 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1974.. . 


68 


93 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1975. . . 


27 


37 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1976. . . 


25 


34 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1977. . . 


6 


10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1978. . . 


48 


72 


439 


669 


582 


818 


1979. . . 


22 


48 


- 


- 


823 


1,009 


1980. .. 


308 


583 


317 


455 


845 


1,155 


1981. . . 


54 


92 


251 


562 


688 


1,351 


1982. . . 


71 


162 


147 


378 


1158 


2,625 


1983. . . 


27 


59 


161 


419 


1160 


3,074 


1984. . . 


58 


173 


132 


419 


673 


1,762 


1985. . . 


19 


53 


78 


225 


435 


1,364 


1986.. . 


16 


53 


94 


324 


195 


555 


1987.. . 


24 


80 


35 


130 


309 


1,144 


1988. . . 


20 


56 


37 


135 


517 


2,061 


1989. . . 


15 


48 


64 


278 


484 


1,540 


1990. . . 


(1) 


(1) 


112 


313 


476 


1,503 


1991. . . 


(1) 


(1) 


48 


169 


305 


1,002 


1992.. . 


(1) 


(1) 


61 


238 


216 


685 


1993. . . 


(1) 


(1) 


27 


96 


289 


931 


1994. . . 


(1) 


(1) 


97 


292 


259 


886 


1995. . . 


(1) 


(1) 


164 


497 


(1) 


(1) 


1996. .. 


25 


82 


171 


515 


223 


296 



See footnotes at end of table. 



COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



23 



SUMMARY OF COMMERCIAL SWORDFISH LANDINGS, BY STATE, 1950-96 - Continued 



Florida, East Coast 



Florida, West Coast 



Louisiana 



1980. . 

1981. . 

1982. . 

1983. . 

1984. . 

1985. . 

1986. . 
1987.. 
1988.. 
1989.. 

1990. . 

1991. . 

1992. . 

1993. . 

1994. . 

1995. . 
1996.. 



Thousand 



262 

113 

538 

1,854 

3,173 
2,719 
3,018 
2,818 
2,639 
2,625 
1,447 
1,964 
2,593 
2,824 

2,891 
2,241 
1,726 
1,860 
1,342 
1,302 
978 



Thousand 



Thousand 



355 

172 

939 

2,565 

5,200 
5,687 
7,641 
7,499 
7,399 
6,928 
3,978 
8,646 
11,275 
10,775 

10,766 
9,343 
7,592 
7,832 
5,779 
5,202 
4,884 



50 

131 

391 

2 

54 
434 

881 
723 
1,025 
604 
595 
887 
445 
566 
580 
764 

4 92 
229 
147 
319 
395 
578 
709 



Thousand 



Thousand 



23 
(2) 



86 

226 

816 

2 

94 
593 

1,460 
1,564 
2,482 
1,855 
1,641 
2,364 
1,261 
2,286 
2,239 
2,818 

1,898 
853 
595 
1,267 
1,615 
2,445 
3,244 



(2) 
102 
138 
748 

1,321 
1,000 

352 
985 
960 
62 6 
309 
633 
749 



Thousand 
Hoi lars 



(2) 

376 

358 

2,082 

4,098 

2,627 

959 
2,468 
2,370 
1,552 

763 
1,613 
1,866 



See footnotes at end of table. 



24 



COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



SUMMARY OF COMMERCIAL SWORDFISH LANDINGS, BY STATE, 1950-96 - Continued 



Year 


Texas 


Calif 


ornia 


Hawa 


ii 




Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 




Pounds 


Dol lars 


Pounds 


Dnllars. 


Pounds. 


Dol lars 


1950. . . 


_ 


_ 


27 


12 


27 


6 


1951.. . 


- 


- 


228 


100 


37 


10 


1952. .. 


- 


- 


266 


100 


26 


7 


1953. .. 


- 


- 


143 


68 


12 


2 


1954.. . 


- 


- 


23 


12 


11 


2 


1955.. . 


- 


- 


135 


58 


38 


6 


1956.. . 


- 


- 


275 


111 


29 


7 


1957. . . 


- 


- 


376 


156 


28 


5 


1958. .. 


- 


- 


472 


165 


25 


4 


1959.. . 


- 


- 


448 


170 


27 


5 


1960. . . 


_ 


_ 


325 


146 


29 


6 


1961.. . 


- 


- 


369 


162 


23 


4 


1962. . . 


- 


- 


39 


20 


25 


4 


1963... 


- 


- 


98 


58 


22 


4 


1964. .. 


- 


- 


183 


103 


24 


4 


1965. . . 


- 


- 


327 


150 


19 


4 


1966... 


- 


- 


469 


220 


16 


4 


1967. .. 


- 


- 


305 


164 


12 


2 


1968. . . 


- 


- 


199 


134 


10 


2 


1969. . . 


- 


- 


1,032 


511 


14 


3 


1970. . . 


_ 


_ 


945 


534 


12 


4 


1971. . . 


- 


- 


154 


86 


2 


1 


1972. . . 


- 


- 


266 


160 


- 


- 


1973. . . 


- 


- 


614 


773 


- 


- 


1974. . . 


- 


- 


650 


887 


- 


- 


1975.. . 


- 


- 


866 


1,397 


1 


1 


1976. . . 


- 


- 


84 


230 


3 


2 


1977. . . 


- 


- 


512 


1,269 


41 


68 


1978. . . 


- 


- 


2,604 


4,563 


29 


41 


1979. .. 


- 


- 


586 


1,812 


29 


43 


1980. . . 


1,353 


1,353 


1,197 


3,144 


33 


44 


1981. . . 


592 


592 


1,652 


3,355 


20 


33 


1982. . ; 


500 


500 


2,452 


5,116 


36 


74 


1983.. . 


210 


210 


3,875 


6,826 


36 


83 


1984. .. 


229 


229 


6,370 


11,685 


22 


50 


1985. . . 


373 


373 


7,535 


13,342 


11 


26 


1986.. . 


381 


381 


5,577 


12,791 


15 


42 


1987. .. 


541 


541 


3,974 


11,126 


13 


40 


1988. . . 


884 


884 


3,602 


9,727 


21 


58 


1989. . . 


1,286 


1,286 


4,148 


11,434 


373 


1,224 


1990. . . 


487 


487 


2,724 


7,171 


2,477 


7,906 


1991. .. 


448 


448 


2,269 


6,344 


6,844 


20,075 


1992. . . 


551 


551 


3,407 


7,573 


8,206 


23,887 


1993.. . 


207 


207 


3,902 


8,975 


8,457 


25,608 


1994. . . 


105 


105 


3,747 


9,599 


4,558 


15,407 


1995.. . 


176 


176 


2,554 


6,532 


3,726 


12,215 


1996. .. 


51 


146 


2,276 


5,501 


5,871 


13,869 



See footnotes at end of table. 



COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



25 



SUMMARY OF COMMERCIAL SWORPnSH LANDINGS, BY STATE, 1950-96 - Continued 



Year 


Other Stat 


es (1) 


Total 1 




Thousand 
Pounds 


Thousand 
Dollars 


Thousand 
Pounds 


Thousfand 
Dollars, 


1950... 


5 


2 


965 


354 


1951. . . 


1 


(2) 


467 


207 


1952.. . 


2 


1 


595 


221 


1953.. . 


- 


- 


398 


153 


1954.. . 


- 


- 


379 


119 


1955. .. 


1 


(2) 


528 


169 


1956.. . 


33 


11 


796 


288 


1957. . . 


13 


4 


1,213 


429 


1958. . . 


30 


12 


2,062 


646 


1959. . . 


12 


5 


1,997 


595 


1960. .. 


17 


7 


1,365 


568 


1961... 


1 


1 


1,292 


520 


1962... 


3 


1 


999 


439 


1963.. . 


- 


- 


2,875 


827 


1964. . . 


1 


(2) 


3,259 


1,150 


1965... 


(2) 


(2) 


3,049 


1,322 


1966.. . 


- 


- 


1,842 


803 


1967... 


- 


- 


1,362 


575 


1968... 


- 


- 


814 


434 


1969. . . 


2 


1 


1,423 


695 


1970... 


290 


226 


1,589 


959 


1971. . . 


- 


- 


234 


160 


1972. . . 


- 


- 


390 


916 


1973. . . 


- 


- 


1,507 


2,046 


1974... 


36 


63 


4,165 


4,422 


1975... 


23 


36 


5,460 


7,232 


1976. . . 


1 


2 


4,336 


6,310 


1977. . . 


4 


26 


3,791 


5,698 


1978. .. 


3 


5 


10,349 


15,301 


1979... 


- 


- 


8,984 


13,853 


1980. . . 


108 


228 


13,662 


23,396 


1981. . . 


135 


319 


10,795 


21,861 


1982. . . 


36 


133 


13,477 


32,080 


1983... 


- 


- 


13,831 


32,812 


1984. . . 


8 


42 


16,136 


39,184 


1985. .. 


- 


- 


16,494 


36,115 


1986. . . 


- 


- 


12,643 


32,746 


1987. . . 


- 


- 


12,839 


41,791 


1988. . . 


4 


10 


15,595 


48,556 


1989... 


- 


- 


16,834 


49,172 


1990.. . 


99 


338 


15,191 


46,070 


1991.. . 


62 


216 


17,381 


52,742 


1992... 


58 


201 


18,774 


53,622 


1993. . . 


36 


127 


19,032 


56,237 


1994. . . 


34 


124 


13,567 


42,961 


1995... 


237 


814 


11,999 


37,111 


1996. . . 


1,195 


4,079 


12,879 


36,494 



(1) Includes confidential data or state landings for New Hampshire, Connecticut, Delaware, 

Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Washington. 

(2) Less than 500 lb or $500. 

NOTE: — Represents the latest information available and therefore may not match previously 
published data. 



26 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



DATA COLLECTION . While data on commercial fisheries was 
collected for many years, prior to 1979 there was no 
continuous, systematic collection of marine recreational fishery 
data. Detailed Information on marine recreational fishing is 
required to support a variety of fishery management and 
development purposes and is mandated by the Magnuson 
Fishery Conservation and Management Act, Public Law 94- 
265, as amended. Therefore, NMFS began the 
comprehensive Marine Recreational Rshery Statistical Survey 
(MRFSS) in 1 979. Data collected through the MRFSS show 
that recreational fisheries have tremendous impacts on fish 
stocks. For several important species recreational landings 
surpass commercial landings. 

The MRFSS data collection consists of an intercept 
survey of anglers in the field and a telephone survey of coastal 
county households. These independent components, along 
with census information, are combined to produce estimates of 
recreational catch, effort, and participation. Estimates are 
generated by subregion, state, species, mode and primary area 
fished. In addition, information on catch rates and 
measurements of fish lengths and weights are obtained. 

The MRFSS is being conducted in 1997 along the 
coast of the entire continental United States except the state of 
Texas. The MRFSS was conducted in the following areas and 
years: 

Atlantic and Gulf (except Texas), 1979-1996; 

Texas 1981-1995; 

Pacific (not including Alaska), mid-1979 through 

1989, 1993- 1996; 
Western Pacific, 1979 through 1981; and 
Caribbean, 1979, 1981. 

In 1 995, the MRFSS estimation process was updated 
to reflect results of statistical research on the survey. 
Improvements included 1) statistical substitution for missing 
data, 2) replacement of missing weights, and 3) telephone 
survey sample weighting by county. Atlantic and Gulf coast 
data for all years were also run through rigorous cleaning 
programs. Pacific coast data for 1 993-1 996 were also cleaned, 
while cleaning of 1 981 -1 989 is underway. Due to the updating 
of the statistical process, historical estimates for 1 981 to 1 993 
for the Atlantic and Gulf coasts and for 1993 for the Pacific 
coast were recalculated. Data from 1979-1980 were not 
recalculated since telephone data by county were not kept in 
those years. This pubication contains the new estimates for all 
years since 1981 . Old MRFSS publications are now obsolete 
and should be discarded. Most estimates did not change 
dramatically, and in all cases, fisheries trends did not change. 



Estimates of trips, participation and catch from the 
MRFSS for the Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific coasts for 1996 are 
presented in the following tables. Data from other NMFS and 
state sun/eys (SE head boats, Texas, Califomia Passenger 
Fishing Vessels (for-hire), Oregon and Washington ocean boat 
fishing. Pacific coast salmon estimates, and Alaska) are not 
included here in order to show the revised MRFSS historical 
data. 



DATA TABLES . The total number of fish caught and the 
weight of the harvest are presented for sixty-four commonly 
caught species on the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific coasts. Total 
number caught includes fish which were brought ashore in 
whole form and were available for identification, weighing, and 
measuring as well as fish which were not available for 
identification. This latter category includes fish which were 
used for bait, discarded, filleted or released alive. 

Trips and numbers of participants are presented by 
state and total catch and harvest weight estimates are 
presented by subregion. Weight estimates apply to harvest, 
not catch, and do not include fish that were released alive. 
Total catch in numbers of fish do include fish that were 
released alive. Catch and harvest weight estimates are also 
shown by primary fishing area. The fishing areas are: state 
territorial seas, or ocean 3 miles or less from land; Exclusive 
Economic Zone (EEZ), or ocean more than 3 miles from land; 
and inland (sounds, rivers, bays). The state territorial sea for 
Florida's Gulf coast is 1 miles or less from land. 

All estimates are shown with their proportional 
standard errors (PSE). PSE's express the standard error of an 
estimate as a percentage of the estimate and are a measure of 
precision. Usual (95%) confidence intervals for estimates are 
calculated as a bwer limit of the estimate minus 1 .96 times the 
standard error and an upper limit of the estimate plus 1 .96 
times the standard error. Example: Estimated trips of 64 million 
with a PSE of 1% means an upper limit of 65,254,400 (1.96 
times 1% of 64 milion) and a lower limit of 62,745,600. A 95% 
confidence interval indicates a 95% certainty that the true value 
lies between the lower and upper limits. 

Sampling coverage by wave (two-month sampling 
periods) has varied across the time series. More detailed 
information as well as the ability to summarize data by year, 
wave, state, fishing mode and/or area are available on the 
Fisheries Statistics and Economics web page 
(http://remorassp.nmfs.gov) and will be available in a separate 
MRFSS report to be published later. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



27 



1996 MRFSS DATA . In 1 996, over 8 million people made 64 
milion marine recreational fishing trips on ttie Atlantic, Gutf and 
Pacific coasts. The marine recreational finfish catch in 1 996 
was an estimated 313 million fish. Over 50% percent of the 
catch was released alive. The total weight of the harvest 
(excluding fish released alive) was an estimated 208 million 
pounds. 

The Atlantic and Gulf coasts accounted for 79% of 
the participants, 88% of the fishing trips, and 89% of the total 
U.S. marine recreational finfish catch by number. Nationwide, 
55% of the catch came from inland waters, 31% came from 
state territorial seas, and 13% came from the EEZ. This 
distribution is different for the Atlantic and Gulf versus the 
Pacific coasts. On the Atlantic and Gutf coasts the majority of 
the catch was from inland waters, while on the Pacific coast, 
the majority of the catch was from the state territorial seas. 

ATLANTIC AND GULF . The number of Atlantic and Gulf 
coast trips made from 1 981 to 1 996 ranged from a low of 44 
milion trips in 1981 to a high of 60 million in 1 986 with no clear 
trend. The number of people engaged in marine recreational 
fishing on the Atlantic and Gulf coast ranged from a low of 6.3 
million in 1989 to a high of 8.9 million in 1983. In 1996, 8.8 
marine recreational fishing participants toot< 56 million trips and 
caught a total of 280 million fish. 

By subregion, the Gulf of Mexico accounted for the 
highest numbers of fish caught (42%) in 1996 followed by the 
Mid-Atlantic (31%). Thirty percent of the Atlantic and Gulf 
coast recreational fishing trips were made in the South Atlantic, 
29% in the Gulf of Mexico, 29% in the Mid-Atlantic, and 12% 
in the North Atlantic. 

The most commonly caught non-bait species 
(numbers of fish) in 1996 were spotted seatrout, summer 
fbunder, Atlantic croaker, black sea bass, bluefish, and striped 
bass. Top-ranked non-bait species by subregion were striped 
bass in the North Atlantic, summer flounder in the Mid-Atlantic, 
spot In the South Atlantic, and spotted seatrout in the Gulf of 
Mexico. By weight, the largest harvests were bluefish, striped 
bass, red drum, dolphin, spotted seatrout, summer flounder, 
and king mackerel. Average weights for all fish combined was 

1 .5 pounds while the average weight for the top harvests were 
3.2 pounds for bluefish, 1 1 .2 for striped bass, 4.6 for red drum, 

7.6 for dolphin, 1.3 for spotted seatrout, 1.4 for summer 
flounder, and 9.9 for king mackerel. 

Although there is no clear trend for all species 
combined, historical trends in number of fish caught do appear 
for some species. Spotted seatrout catch increased since the 
earty 1980's from less than 15 million fish to about 20 million. 
Summer flounder catches were 13 million or more fish until two 



very low years with less than 10 million fish in 1989 and 1990, 
followed by an increase back to levels similar to the early 
1980's. Most of the decrease in 1989-1990 occurred in the 
Mid-Atlantic. Atlantic croaker and black sea bass showed no 
clear trends. Bluefish show a general decrease in numbers 
caught from highs near 30 million fish in the early 1980's to 
lows near 1 million fish since 1 992. The catch of striped bass 
increased steadily and dramatically since 1990 with a record 
catch of over 14 million fish in 1996. Over 90% of these fish 
were released alive in 1996. 

Thirteen percent of the total marine recreational catch 
on the Atlantic and Gutf coasts came from the EEZ. The most 
commonly caught species in federally managed waters were 
black sea bass, Atlantic mackerel, dolphin, red snapper, and 
bluefish. 

PACIFIC. In 1 996, 1 .8 marine recreational fishing participants 
took 7.8 million trips on the Pacific coast and caught a total of 
34 million fish. Seventy-three percent of the Pacific coast 
recreational fishing trips (excluding salmon and California for- 
hire boat trips) were made in California, followed by 21% in 
Washington, and 6% in Oregon. 

Commonly caught species in 1 996 (by numbers) were 
Pacific mackerel, surf smelt, white croaker, kelp bass and 
barred sand bass. By weight, the largest harvests were 
California halibut. Pacific mackerel, black rockfish, barred 
sandbass, and lingcod. Average weights for all fish combined 
was 1.1 pounds while the average weight for the top harvests 
were 7.7 pounds for California halibut, 0.9 for Pacific (chub) 
mackerel, 1 .9 for black rockfish, 1 .6 for barred sandbass, and 
6.7 for lingcod. 

Historical trends in number of fish can not be 
examined until the 1981-1989 estimates are recalculated; 
however, there are some changes that should be noted, in 
1996, surf smelt jumped from the 1993-1 995 average of a little 
over a million fish to almost 5 million fish. California halibut 
catch steadily increased from 347,000 fish in 1993 to 712,000 
fish in 1996. Pacific mackerel reached a 4-year high in 1996 
with 5.5 million fish caught. It should be noted, however, that 
the 1996 data include Washington state catches whereas the 
1 993-1 995 data do not. 

Eleven percent of the total marine recreational catch 
on the Pacific coast came from the EEZ. The most commonly 
caught Pacific coast species in federally managed waters for 
1996 were Pacific mackerel, barred sand bass. Pacific 
barracuda, kelp bass, and white croaker. The percent of the 
catch from the state territorial sea dropped from above 65% in 
1 993-1 995 to 51% in 1 996, while the inland catch increased 
from 1 3-17% to 38% of the catch. 



28 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



MRFSS SAMPLING COVERAGE BY WAVE, STATE AND MODE, 1979-1996 FOR THE 
ATLANTIC, GULF AND PACIFIC COASTS 



ATLANTIC AND 
GULF COASTS 



PACIFIC COAST 



Wave 1 ME-TX 

Wave 1 FL-TX 

Wave 1 FL-LA 

Wave 1 GA 

Wave 1 SC 

Wave 1 NC 

Waves 2-5 ME-TX 

Waves 2-5 ME-LA 

Waves 2-5 MA-LA 

Waves 3-5 ME-NH 

Wave 6 MA-TX 

Wave 6 MA-LA 

Wave 6 ME-NH 

TX Shore 

TX Boats 

NC-TX Partyboats 



Wave 1 WA-CA 

Wave 1 WA-CA 

Wave 1 OR-CA 

Wave 1 CA 

Wave 2-5 WA-CA 

Wave 2-5 OR-CA 

Wave 2-5 WA-CA 

Wave 6 WA-CA 

Wave 6 OR-CA 

Wave 6 CA 

Wave 6 OR 

Wave 6 WA-CA 



80 85 


90 




95 


^ : 






1 1 1 


1 1 1 i 







i i i 


: : i : i M : - 




















» 






















! ■ ! I 



80 85 90 


95 





h-H. 









Note: Salmon trips are excluded on the Pacific coast. Ocean boat trips 
were excluded in WA in 1989 and in OR. during July/August. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



29 







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844 

1,123 

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1,121 

1,200 

859 

959 

1,034 

963 

1,203 

977 

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845 

874 

972 


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30 



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32 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



LU 
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U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



33 



ESTIMATED NUMBER OF PEOPLE PARTICIPATING IN MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHING 
AND PSE (%) BY STATE AND YEAR, 1993-1996 FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 



YEAR 


PACIFIC COAST SUB-REGION 




1 


SO. CALIFORNIA 


NO. CALIFORNIA 


OREGON 


WASHINGTON 


TOTAL (1) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST |PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST |PSE(%) 


EST |PSE(%) 


1993. . . 

1994. . . 

1995. . . 

1996. . . 


Ml IkJIDCD IM TUrtl tCAKinC _ J 


985 
1,285 
1,063 

958 


6 

6 

7 

10 


620 
449 
634 
523 


7 
7 
7 
7 


300 
216 
249 
219 


8 
7 

7 

11 




NA 

NA 

NA 

447 


NA 

NA 

NA 

9 


1,661 
1,671 
1,678 
1,783 


4 
4 
4 
4 



(1) SUB-REGION TOTALS DO NOT INCLUDE OUT OF STATE ANGLERS SINCE THEY CAN BE COUNTED MULTIPLE TIMES 

THEREFORE, THE SUM OF PARTICIPANTS ACROSS STATES WILL NOT EQUAL TOTALS SHOWN IN LAST COLUMN. 
NOTE: EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 

NA - NOT AVAILABLE (MRFSS NOT CONDUCTED IN WASHINGTON FROM 1993-1995) . 

ESTIMATED NUMBER OF MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHING TRIPS AND PSE(%) BY 
STATE AND YEAR. 1993-1996 FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 



YEAR 


PACIFIC COAST SUB-REGION 




1 


SO. CALIFORNIA 


NO. CALIFORNIA 


OREGON 


WASHINGTON 


TOTAL 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST |PSE(%) 


1993. . . 

1994. . . 

1995. . . 

1996. . . 


Ml IkilDCD IM XUrvl ICAMHC J 


4,038 
4,748 
4,300 
3,519 


4 
4 
4 

5 


2,152 
1,968 
2,340 
2,186 


5 
6 

5 
4 


704 
471 
579 
497 


6 

5 
5 
8 


NA 

NA 

NA 

1,648 


NA 

NA 

NA 

7 


6,893 
7,187 
7,220 
7,849 


3 
3 
3 
3 



NOTE: EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 

NA - NOT AVAILABLE (MRFSS NOT CONDUCTED IN WASHINGTON FROM 1993-1995). 

ESTIMATED NUMBER OF PEOPLE PARTICIPATING IN MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHING 
AND PSE (%) BY COAST AND YEAR. 1993-1996 U.S. TOTALS 



YEAR 


U.S. TOTALS 






ATLANTIC COAST 


GULF OF MEXICO 


PACIFIC COAST 


TOTAL 


EST |PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST |PSE(%) 


1993 


Ml IHJIDCD IM TUr>l ICAMHC 1 


5,186 
5,691 
5,022 
4,801 


3 
2 
2 
3 


j^jj_ 

1,877 

1,931 
2,009 
1,818 


3 
2 
2 
3 


1,661 
1,671 
1,678 
1,783 


4 
4 
4 
4 


8,724 
9,293 
8,709 
8,402 


2 
2 
2 
2 


1994 


1995 


1996 





NOTE: EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. TOTALS ONLY INCLUDE CONTINENTAL U.S. 
TEXAS DATA NOT INCLUDED FOR ALL YEARS AND WASHINGTON NOT INCLUDED FOR 1993-1995. 



ESTIMATED NUMBER OF MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHING TRIPS AND PSE(%) BY 
COAST AND YEAR. 1993-1996 U.S. TOTALS 



YEAR 


U.S. TOTALS 






ATLANTIC COAST 


GULF OF MEXICO 


PACIFIC COAST 


TOTAL 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


1993 


Ml 


MRI=R l^ 


J TUOI IQAKine 




38,311 
42,446 
40,843 
40,081 


1 
1 
1 
1 


iSi! 

17,431 
17,504 
17,115 
16,319 


1 
1 
1 

2 


6,893 
7,187 
7,220 
7,849 


3 

3 
3 
3 


62,635 
67,137 
65,178 
64,249 


1 
1 
1 
1 


1994 


1995 


1996 





NOTE: EST = ESTIMATE. PSE(%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. TOTALS ONLY INCLUDE CONTINENTAL U.S. 
TEXAS DATA NOT INCLUDED FOR ALL YEARS AND WASHINGTON NOT INCLUDED FOR 1993-1995. 



34 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) WITH PSE (%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1981-1996 FOR THE 
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


ATLANTIC COD 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID-ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Ml inDCDC IM Tunr ICAMnC 








1981. . . 


4,280 


18 


401 


16 














4,681 


17 


1982. 






2,813 


22 


671 


29 














3,484 


18 


1983. 






3,074 


13 


265 


27 














3,340 


12 


1984. 






1, 514 


8 


83 


28 














1,597 


8 


1985. 






3,703 


36 


112 


40 














3, 815 


35 


1986. 






1,417 


13 


51 


24 














1,468 


13 


1987. 






2,906 


17 


190 


34 














3,097 


16 


1988. 






2,151 


19 


657 


19 














2,809 


15 


1989. 






1,998 


10 


338 


16 














2,336 


9 


1990. 






2,103 


11 


209 


15 














2,311 


10 


1991. 






2, 171 


13 


84 


21 














2,255 


13 


1992. 






731 


12 


119 


15 














850 


10 


1993. 






2,270 


11 


423 


15 














2,693 


10 


1994. 






1,749 


8 


112 


23 














1,861 


8 


1995. 






1,747 


15 


195 


19 














1, 942 


14 


1996. 






1,061 


10 


19 


24 














1,080 


10 


YEAR 




ATLANTIC CROAKER 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID-ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Ml IUDCDC IM Tuni ICAK 


nt; 








1981. . . 








1,313 


18 


2,775 


1 1 1V./IJVJ/-V11 

15 


5,312 


15 


9,400 


10 


1982. 












361 


29 


3,691 


18 


10,462 


13 


14,515 


10 


1983. 












5,180 


15 


3,898 


17 


10,267 


11 


19,345 


8 


1984. 












3,002 


14 


8,442 


10 


8,753 


11 


20,197 


7 


1985. 












3, 935 


10 


5,484 


25 


7,345 


11 


16,764 


10 


1986. 












9,137 


9 


6,726 


25 


14,204 


9 


30,067 


8 


1987. 












5,534 


6 


6,213 


16 


4,640 


14 


16,387 


7 


1988. 












6,161 


10 


4,467 


10 


6,948 


19 


17,577 


9 


1989. 












3,612 


6 


3,822 


7 


2,799 


13 


10,233 


5 


1990. 












6,488 


10 


4,247 


6 


4,094 


13 


14,829 


6 


1991. 












15,578 


7 


3,232 


7 


7, 122 


14 


25,932 


6 


1992. 












9,722 


8 


3,403 


4 


3, 827 


9 


16,953 


5 


1993. 












14, 136 


6 


2,921 


5 


3,959 


7 


21,016 


5 


1994. 












17,472 


5 


5,753 


5 


3,445 


6 


26,671 


3 


1995. 












12,246 


6 


2,970 


7 


2,537 


6 


17,753 


4 


1996. 












12,082 


6 


2,245 


5 


2,539 


7 


16,867 


5 



(1 ) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE;-EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



35 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) WITH PSE (%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1981-1996 FOR THE 
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 









ATLANTIC MACKEREL 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Ml ir/IRCOC; IM TMI-vl IQAMnC 








1981. . . 


2, 129 


22 


2,969 


20 


10 


76 


a. 







5,108 


15 


1982. 






689 


33 


854 


28 














1,543 


21 


1983. 






953 


14 


3,146 


31 


21 


72 








4, 119 


24 


1984. 






1,437 


16 


2,388 


25 














3,825 


17 


1985. 






5,185 


39 


2, 625 


22 


15 


73 








7,825 


27 


1986. 






1,552 


23 


3, 836 


26 














5,388 


20 


1987. 






2,991 


20 


4,743 


20 














7,735 


15 


1988. 






4,890 


22 


1,105 


34 


4 


100 








5,999 


19 


1989. 






2,926 


10 


1,109 


24 














4,035 


10 


1990. 






2,585 


11 


1,406 


25 














3, 994 


12 


1991. 






3,287 


16 


2,168 


19 














5,455 


12 


1992. 






787 


11 


252 


35 














1,045 


12 


1993. 






2,161 


10 


144 


35 














2,307 


10 


1994. 






4,690 


12 


170 


44 














4, 860 


12 


1995. 






2,934 


13 


1,074 


35 














4, 008 


13 


1996. 




_ 


3,001 


10 


647 


26 


1 


55 








3,650 


9 


YEAR 


BLACK DRUM 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Ml l^/IDCDC IM TUOl ICAMPl 


5 








1981. . . 








4 


74 


71 


21 


473 


15 


548 


13 


1982. 


















194 


22 


1,514 


13 


1,708 


12 


1983. 












46 


22 


220 


19 


1,497 


14 


1, 764 


12 


1984. 












4 


62 


273 


16 


668 


16 


946 


12 


1985. 












7 


31 


240 


18 


658 


14 


905 


12 


1986. 












35 


40 


415 


18 


1,442 


13 


1,892 


11 


1987. 












16 


30 


388 


19 


1,180 


14 


1,584 


11 


1988. 












1 


58 


210 


14 


1,213 


8 


1,424 


7 


1989. 












5 


32 


108 


19 


622 


14 


736 


12 


1990. 












3 


47 


134 


16 


680 


16 


818 


14 


1991. 












5 


40 


348 


13 


671 


12 


1,024 


9 


1992. 












5 


34 


270 


9 


1,130 


7 


1,405 


6 


1993. 












12 


34 


253 


9 


1,268 


9 


1,534 


7 


1994. 












4 


41 


297 


8 


824 


8 


1,125 


6 


1995. 












27 


23 


505 


10 


1,063 


8 


1,595 


6 


1996. 












22 


29 


355 


8 


818 


7 


1,196 


6 



(1) 

NOTE:- 



GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 
-EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



36 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) WITH PSE (%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1981-1996 FOR THE 
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


BLACK SEA BASS 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) i EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










fgyh^DCDC IM Turn IQAMRQ 








1981. . . 


228 


26 


3,299 


16 


2,606 


15 


246 


65 


6,379 


10 


1982. 






321 


21 


11,025 


32 


3,555 


13 


1,036 


14 


15,936 


22 


1983. 






232 


19 


6,878 


13 


2,847 


15 


1,194 


20 


11,152 


9 


1984. 






129 


22 


2,956 


12 


4,009 


10 


558 


23 


7,652 


7 


1985. 






122 


29 


5,769 


8 


3,450 


11 


4,191 


20 


13,532 


8 


1986. 






874 


15 


27,939 


17 


1, 947 


10 


2,065 


12 


32, 825 


14 


1987. 






346 


26 


4,552 


9 


2,785 


7 


2,861 


13 


10, 544 


6 


1988. 






258 


20 


7,540 


8 


2,947 


13 


5, 049 


7 


15,794 


5 


1989. 






141 


15 


6,209 


5 


2,261 


9 


5,453 


8 


14,064 


4 


1990. 






58 


19 


8,960 


6 


1,384 


11 


3,323 


8 


13,725 


4 


1991. 






88 


22 


10,592 


5 


1, 900 


9 


3,280 


12 


15, 859 


4 


1992. 






40 


13 


7,515 


6 


1,824 


7 


2,380 


6 


11,759 


4 


1993. 






67 


14 


8,898 


14 


1,418 


7 


2,375 


7 


12,758 


10 


1994. 






33 


38 


6,995 


7 


2,131 


6 


2,735 


6 


11, 892 


4 


1995. 






122 


12 


13,841 


7 


1,660 


6 


2,170 


6 


17, 793 


6 


1996. 






195 


13 


9,807 


7 


1,312 


7 


1,435 


7 


12, 750 


6 


YEAR 


BLUEFISH 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










Ml IMDCDC IM Tt-im ICAMRQ 










1981. . . 


8,707 


14 


18,397 


INUIV 

24 


4,157 


14 


494 


28 


31,755 


14 


1982. 






10,096 


12 


11,276 


9 


5,848 


11 


499 


19 


27,719 


6 


1983. 






7, 190 


18 


15,866 


7 


7,082 


13 


2,337 


30 


32,475 


6 


1984. 






5,485 


10 


15,176 


9 


5,847 


7 


560 


45 


27,068 


6 


1985. 






5,709 


13 


12,756 


7 


4,009 


8 


519 


26 


22,993 


5 


1986. 






8,437 


7 


18,459 


6 


3, 514 


10 


888 


23 


31,298 


4 


1987. 






6, 541 


8 


17,318 


5 


3, 744 


7 


888 


16 


28,491 


4 


1988. 






2, 311 


6 


7,318 


8 


3,736 


8 


1, 070 


11 


14,435 


5 


1989. 






2, 931 


9 


12,103 


4 


3,603 


7 


878 


11 


19,515 


3 


1990. 






2,866 


7 


9,702 


4 


3,878 


6 


427 


19 


16, 873 


3 


1991. 






4, 845 


7 


11,040 


4 


2,407 


6 


959 


16 


19,251 


3 


1992. 






3, 080 


6 


5,640 


4 


2,681 


6 


589 


13 


11,990 


3 


1993. 






2,425 


5 


4,516 


5 


2,984 


4 


376 


12 


10,301 


3 


1994. 






2,220 


6 


6,190 


6 


3,510 


4 


484 


12 


12,405 


3 


1995. 






2, 022 


6 


5,113 


5 


3,341 


5 


464 


12 


10,940 


3 


1996. 






2, 810 


7 


5,135 


5 


1,954 


4 


471 


12 


10,370 


3 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:-EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



37 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) WITH PSE (%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1981-1996 FOR THE 
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


DOLPHIN 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










[\HjH/incDC IM TurK iqamrc 






1981. . . 














607 


24 


224 


21 


1,128 


16 


1982. 












2 


100 


595 


14 


728 


23 


1,332 


14 


1983. 












4 


40 


981 


16 


209 


21 


1,194 


13 


1984. 












9 


71 


801 


24 


297 


35 


1,107 


20 


1985. 












34 


36 


704 


21 


397 


30 


1,138 


16 


1986. 












31 


27 


756 


11 


750 


16 


1,539 


10 


1987. 












14 


25 


902 


10 


623 


15 


1,554 


8 


1988. 









54 


27 


33 


1,121 


11 


460 


16 


1,689 


9 


1989. 






1 


74 


153 


21 


2,046 


8 


694 


14 


2,923 


7 


1990. 






1 


94 


92 


34 


1, 150 


10 


536 


25 


1,925 


10 


1991. 






2 


58 


142 


20 


1,883 


7 


1,112 


14 


3,141 


6 


1992. 









100 


154 


20 


924 


6 


388 


12 


1,484 


5 


1993. 






18 


29 


24G 


22 


961 


5 


675 


11 


1,927 


5 


1994. 






1 


54 


86 


20 


1,680 


7 


653 


11 


2,450 


6 


1995. 






11 


60 


74 


21 


1,523 


4 


963 


8 


2,613 


4 


199S. 






1 


100 


199 


35 


1,233 


5 


461 


9 


1, 905 


5 


GAG 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










fvgyi^CaCDC IM TWm IQAMRQ 








1981. . . 














61 


42 


182 


27 


243 


23 


1982. 


















7 


41 


381 


14 


388 


14 


1983. 


















22 


49 


758 


23 


780 


22 


1984. 


















77 


20 


261 


35 


338 


27 


1985. 


















78 


26 


280 


17 


359 


14 


1986. 


















46 


22 


198 


18 


244 


15 


1987. 


















102 


29 


298 


13 


400 


12 


1988. 


















63 


24 


272 


13 


335 


12 


1989. 


















124 


15 


432 


13 


556 


11 


1990. 


















73 


22 


585 


17 


658 


15 


1991. 


















66 


15 


1,139 


11 


1,205 


11 


1992. 


















81 


12 


1,014 


8 


1, 095 


7 


1993. 


















86 


19 


1,652 


6 


1, 738 


6 


1994. 


















137 


15 


2,095 


5 


2,232 


5 


1995. 


















123 


12 


2,416 


5 


2,539 


5 


1996. 


















96 


12 


1,494 


5 


1,590 


5 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:--EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



38 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) WITH PSE (%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1981-1996 FOR THE 
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


GRAY SNAPPER 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










[SjlJh^QPDC IM Twni ICAKinC 








1981. . . 














897 


39 


746 


17 


1,643 


22 


1982. 


















532 


28 


1,500 


11 


2,032 


11 


1983. 


















472 


16 


3,625 


34 


4,097 


31 


1984. 


















409 


18 


3,965 


22 


4,373 


20 


1985. 


















938 


19 


1,383 


20 


2,321 


14 


1986. 


















524 


13 


1,570 


18 


2,093 


14 


1987. 


















653 


13 


1,378 


41 


2,031 


28 


1988. 


















587 


11 


1,396 


9 


1,983 


7 


1989. 












1 


100 


736 


10 


2,415 


8 


3,152 


7 


1990. 


















697 


12 


1, 872 


10 


2,570 


8 


1991. 


















1,074 


10 


6,332 


8 


7,405 


7 


1992. 


















1,178 


7 


4,185 


7 


5,363 


5 


1993. 


















745 


7 


4,408 


4 


5,154 


4 


1994. 


















1,312 


8 


3,534 


5 


4,845 


4 


1995. 


















1,315 


12 


3,237 


5 


4,552 


5 


1996. 


















1,084 


8 


3,330 


6 


4,413 


5 


YEAR 


GRAY TRIGGERFISH 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID AT 


^NTIC SOUTH ATLj<\NTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE{%) EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










fgyi^DCDC IM Turii icamrc 










1981. . . 














36 


28 


338 


24 


374 


22 


1982. 












1 


49 


68 


21 


626 


18 


695 


17 


1983. 












14 


60 


51 


25 


138 


16 


203 


13 


1984. 






2 


100 








66 


22 


180 


65 


247 


48 


1985. 












8 


82 


147 


28 


154 


23 


308 


18 


1986. 






3 


100 


7 


31 


135 


22 


515 


24 


660 


19 


1987. 












35 


37 


94 


19 


693 


27 


822 


23 


1988. 












4 


71 


151 


18 


760 


12 


914 


10 


1989. 






1 


63 


43 


33 


378 


18 


997 


12 


1,419 


10 


1990. 






1 


59 


35 


29 


181 


15 


1,099 


14 


1,315 


12 


1991. 






2 


40 


67 


21 


382 


15 


957 


12 


1,408 


9 


1992. 






1 


100 


20 


21 


197 


9 


818 


8 


1,035 


6 


1993 . 






1 


52 


89 


23 


154 


13 


661 


8 


906 


7 


1994. 






1 


53 


31 


27 


115 


10 


686 


8 


834 


6 


1995. 









100 


38 


28 


131 


13 


661 


8 


830 


7 


1996. 






1 


50 


106 


34 


162 


12 


392 


8 


662 


8 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:--EST = ESTIMATE PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



39 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) WITH PSE (%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1981-1996 FOR THE 
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 









GREATER AMBERJACK 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Ml IRJ1BCDC IM TMni ICAMnC 






1981. . . 














69 


31 


122 


28 


190 


21 


1982. 












7 


62 


38 


38 


505 


19 


550 


17 


1983. 


















27 


26 


243 


25 


270 


22 


1984. 












10 


56 


78 


19 


77 


18 


164 


13 


1985. 












2 


50 


126 


20 


128 


20 


257 


14 


198G. 












28 


29 


126 


15 


628 


16 


782 


13 


1987. 












9 


55 


127 


24 


676 


19 


811 


16 


1988. 












7 


63 


93 


16 


292 


19 


392 


14 


1989. 












18 


20 


94 


25 


723 


15 


835 


13 


1990. 












30 


31 


84 


15 


139 


27 


253 


16 


1991. 












88 


36 


103 


14 


518 


13 


709 


11 


1992. 












12 


33 


103 


14 


577 


22 


692 


18 


1993. 












694 


19 


67 


12 


380 


10 


1,141 


12 


1994. 












1 


52 


98 


13 


233 


11 


332 


9 


1995. 












2 


73 


35 


16 


126 


14 


164 


11 


1996. 












25 


37 


90 


13 


142 


9 


258 


8 


YEAR 


KING MACKEREL 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








NUIV 


BERS IN THOUSANDS 


















1981. . . 








3 


76 


462 


39 


238 


62 


703 


33 


1982. 


















742 


14 


750 


62 


1,492 


32 


1983. 


















684 


18 


261 


34 


945 


16 


1984. 


















685 


15 


304 


31 


989 


14 


1985. 















61 


849 


25 


149 


19 


998 


21 


1986. 












11 


28 


689 


11 


177 


13 


877 


9 


1987. 












7 


37 


633 


10 


443 


11 


1,083 


7 


1988. 












13 


34 


672 


10 


356 


9 


1,041 


7 


1989. 












7 


20 


427 


8 


41S 


24 


850 


13 


1990. 












2 


55 


582 


7 


487 


16 


1,071 


8 


1991. 






1 


71 


12 


27 


672 


6 


751 


9 


1,436 


6 


1992. 












13 


26 


790 


9 


485 


7 


1,289 


6 


1993. 












17 


40 


506 


5 


500 


6 


1,023 


4 


1994. 












5 


47 


461 


6 


682 


6 


1,148 


4 


1995. 












1 


61 


628 


6 


622 


6 


1,252 


4 


1996. 












2 


59 


485 


5 


748 


7 


1,235 


4 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:-EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



40 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) WITH PSE (%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1981-1996 FOR THE 
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


RED DRUM 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










ML l^*DCDC IM Tuni ICAMnC 






1981. . . 








50 


59 


VlLJl-IX^ 111 

136 


1 iww^ni.L.^ 
23 


i 

1,517 


11 


1,704 


10 


1982. 


















428 


15 


2,907 


10 


3,335 


9 


1983. 












35 


45 


652 


14 


4,969 


12 


5,657 


11 


1984. 












1 


100 


1,100 


12 


3,760 


11 


4,862 


9 


1985. 












1 


73 


1,218 


15 


2,439 


11 


3,658 


9 


198S. 












49 


24 


607 


9 


3,542 


6 


4,197 


6 


1987. 












2 


59 


1,487 


9 


4,881 


7 


6,370 


6 


1988. 












8 


50 


1,292 


10 


4,504 


5 


5,805 


5 


1989. 












23 


26 


570 


10 


3,814 


7 


4,407 


6 


1990. 












2 


72 


612 


13 


2,401 


7 


3,015 


6 


1991. 












39 


34 


1,390 


12 


6,642 


7 


8,070 


7 


1992. 












29 


29 


844 


6 


7,809 


4 


8,682 


3 


1993. 












64 


36 


1,274 


7 


6,310 


4 


7,649 


4 


1994. 












12 


32 


1,683 


6 


5,913 


4 


7,609 


3 


1995. 












36 


37 


2, 105 


7 


7,096 


4 


9,236 


3 


199G. 












3 


40 


1, 130 


6 


5,952 


3 


7,085 


3 


YEAR 


RED SNAPPER 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










NUM'''^°'^ "*' Tuni icAMnc 








1981. . . 














166 


25 


1,791 


19 


1,957 


18 


1982. 


















60 


31 


1,456 


19 


1,516 


18 


1983. 


















206 


18 


2,617 


16 


2,823 


15 


1984. 


















539 


15 


676 


15 


1,215 


11 


1985. 


















619 


17 


827 


13 


1,445 


11 


1986. 


















181 


32 


875 


12 


1,056 


12 


1987. 


















170 


37 


857 


21 


1,027 


19 


1988. 


















270 


25 


912 


11 


1,183 


10 


1989. 















° 


196 


17 


985 


14 


1,181 


12 


1990. 


















17 


30 


930 


14 


947 


14 


1991. 


















91 


27 


1,509 


9 


1,600 


9 


1992. 


















116 


15 


1,908 


6 


2,024 


5 


1993. 


















87 


23 


2,458 


5 


2,546 


5 


1994. 


















95 


21 


1,916 


6 


2,011 


5 


1995. 


















69 


16 


1,539 


6 


1,609 


6 


199G. 


















34 


24 


1,700 


6 


1,733 


6 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:~EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



41 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) WITH PSE (%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1981-1996 FOR THE 
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 









SAND SEATROUT 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










fgU'*'""^^'^ "^' "rum iCANinc 








1981. . . 




















9,215 


45 


9,215 


45 


1982. 
























3,498 


22 


3,498 


22 


1983. 
























5,457 


18 


5,457 


18 


1984. 
























7,681 


22 


7,681 


22 


1985. 
























6,791 


16 


6,791 


16 


1986. 
























7,118 


8 


7,118 


8 


1987. 
























4,008 


9 


4,008 


9 


1988. 


















1 


100 


2,951 


8 


2,953 


8 


1989. 
























3,421 


16 


3,421 


16 


1990. 
























4, 583 


9 


4,583 


9 


1991. 
























5,135 


10 


5,135 


10 


1992. 
























3,780 


10 


3,780 


10 


1993. 
























4,068 


7 


4,068 


7 


1994. 
























5,665 


5 


5,665 


5 


1995. 
























4,355 


7 


4,355 


7 


1996. 
























4,624 


6 


4,624 


6 


YEAR 


SOUP 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










Ml IMDCDO IM TUril ICAMnC 










1981. . . 


4, 954 


12 


5,419 


INUIV 

37 


5 


49 








10,389 


20 


1982. 






5,200 


12 


1, 980 


14 


5 


46 








7,185 


10 


1983 . 






4,064 


13 


6, 091 


17 





66 








10,156 


11 


1984. 






2,846 


12 


4, 929 


22 














7,775 


15 


1985. 






7,953 


15 


5,908 


16 


8 


56 








13,868 


11 


1986. 






19,454 


10 


11,418 


10 


2 


71 








30,874 


7 


1987. 






9,278 


11 


3,097 


15 


2 


57 








12,377 


9 


1988. 






5,598 


8 


1,940 


16 


2 


31 





° 


7,540 


7 


1989. 






6,507 


8 


4,877 


7 


10 


20 








11,395 


6 


1990. 






4,178 


8 


5,993 


7 


1 


79 








10,172 


5 


1991. 






10,032 


6 


6,811 


6 


13 


34 








16,855 


5 


1992. 






5,392 


8 


4,621 


8 


65 


19 








10,078 


5 


1993. 






4,337 


8 


2,723 


8 


17 


24 








7,077 


6 


1994. 






2,431 


7 


3,192 


13 


39 


41 








5,662 


8 


1995. 






2,572 


7 


1,111 


20 


5 


27 








3,688 


8 


1996. 






3,533 


9 


1,321 


13 


4 


34 








4,858 


7 



(1 ) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:--EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



42 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) WITH PSE (%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1981-1996 FOR THE 
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


SHEEPSHEAD 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST i PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 




- 




.„ Mil 


MBERS IN THOUSAND 


, 










j^tiJ_ 


2. 






1981. . . 








7 


72 


311 


19 


832 


16 


1,150 


13 


1982. 


















1,149 


15 


1,937 


9 


3,087 


8 


1983. 












3 


63 


600 


23 


3,075 


16 


3,678 


14 


1984. 


















1,142 


15 


2,660 


11 


3, 803 


9 


1985. 















100 


527 


17 


1,839 


13 


2,366 


11 


1986. 












1 


100 


921 


13 


2,096 


23 


3,018 


16 


1987. 












12 


71 


1,280 


14 


1,577 


8 


2,870 


8 


1988. 












1 


49 


939 


12 


3,356 


7 


4,296 


6 


1989. 












5 


91 


714 


18 


3,128 


9 


3,847 


8 


1990. 












2 


93 


860 


10 


2,071 


11 


2,933 


8 


1991. 












1 


74 


1,270 


9 


2,240 


10 


3,510 


7 


1992. 












10 


65 


1,535 


8 


4,389 


5 


5,933 


4 


1993. 












1 


74 


1,263 


14 


4,329 


5 


5,593 


5 


1994. 












4 


78 


1,715 


8 


2,663 


5 


4,383 


5 


1995. 












14 


42 


1,538 


8 


3,552 


6 


5,118 


5 


199e. 












2 


59 


944 


6 


2,593 


5 


3,542 


4 


YEAR 






SOUTHERN FLOUNDER 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE {%) 








Ml IM 


BERS IN THOUSANDS 










■" 




I'l'-'lv' 








1981. . . 














122 


30 


740 


20 


862 


18 


1982. 












158 


56 


620 


54 


1,620 


19 


2,398 


19 


1983. 


















428 


14 


2,305 


31 


2,733 


26 


1984. 












1 


100 


444 


10 


602 


18 


1,048 


11 


1985. 












3 


62 


610 


12 


659 


18 


1,272 


11 


1986. 












10 


33 


489 


13 


2,499 


18 


2,998 


15 


1987. 


















623 


39 


389 


10 


1,013 


24 


1988. 












25 


49 


359 


10 


953 


14 


1,337 


10 


1989. 












2 


65 


403 


14 


630 


29 


1,035 


18 


1990. 


















406 


10 


1,168 


17 


1,574 


13 


1991. 












2 


59 


432 


8 


839 


9 


1,274 


6 


1992. 












30 


48 


501 


6 


616 


7 


1,148 


5 


1993. 












2 


73 


509 


6 


572 


8 


1,083 


5 


1994. 


















830 


6 


539 


7 


1,369 


4 


1995. 


















740 


7 


706 


6 


1,446 


5 


1996. 












1 


59 


454 


7 


738 


7 


1,192 


5 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:-EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



43 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) WITH PSE (%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1981-1996 FOR THE 
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


SPANISH MACKEREL 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Ml IHQCDC IM TUm ICAMI-lC 








1981. . . 


4 


100 








806 


18 


1,643 


15 


2,454 


11 


1982. 


















896 


29 


3,099 


18 


3,995 


16 


1983. 


















135 


24 


3,307 


24 


3,442 


23 


1984. 


















976 


31 


819 


16 


1,795 


18 


1985. 


















526 


20 


1,126 


11 


1,652 


10 


1986. 












9 


59 


1, 108 


16 


10,388 


12 


11,505 


11 


1987. 












25 


45 


1,065 


7 


2,192 


8 


3,281 


6 


1988. 












102 


38 


1,697 


6 


2, 122 


8 


3, 921 


5 


1989. 









100 


107 


24 


1,244 


8 


1, 579 


7 


2,930 


5 


1990. 









85 


91 


21 


1,299 


6 


3,665 


9 


5,056 


7 


1991. 






12 


31 


178 


14 


1,672 


5 


2,924 


9 


4,786 


6 


1992. 






1 


100 


106 


16 


1,474 


4 


3,994 


5 


5,575 


4 


1993. 






1 


62 


197 


14 


949 


6 


2,506 


6 


3,653 


4 


1994. 












341 


13 


1,502 


6 


2,007 


5 


3,850 


4 


1995. 












147 


23 


847 


6 


1,574 


9 


2,568 


6 


1996. 












100 


35 


1,069 


6 


1,818 


7 


2,988 


5 


YEAR 


SPOT 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Ml IK^DCDC IM TUiril ICAMRC 










1981. . . 








22,965 


17 


6,398 


18 


188 


34 


29,551 


13 


1982. 












12,137 


11 


7,597 


9 


154 


26 


19,888 


8 


1983. 












17,562 


17 


7,504 


13 


411 


66 


25,477 


13 


1984. 












6,190 


10 


5,691 


12 


20 


60 


11,901 


8 


1985. 












9,361 


7 


13,201 


11 


41 


52 


22,603 


7 


1986. 












13,095 


7 


6,067 


14 


179 


40 


19,341 


7 


1987. 












9,031 


7 


3,866 


7 


123 


28 


13,021 


5 


1988. 












4,252 


11 


6,464 


11 


99 


41 


10, 814 


8 


1989. 












8,211 


5 


4,793 


7 


52 


66 


13,057 


4 


1990. 












13, 822 


6 


3,124 


7 


424 


52 


17,371 


5 


1991. 












20,205 


6 


4,425 


6 


413 


42 


25,043 


5 


1992. 












10,698 


9 


4, 047 


6 


229 


39 


14,974 


6 


1993. 












7,713 


8 


5,562 


7 


988 


33 


14,263 


6 


1994. 












8,815 


5 


9,449 


6 


227 


33 


18,491 


4 


1995. 












5,343 


8 


6,039 


6 


185 


29 


11,567 


5 


1996. 












2,668 


10 


4,630 


9 


66 


27 


7,364 


7 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:~EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



44 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) WITH PSE (%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1981-1996 FOR THE 
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


SPOTTED SEATROUT 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Ml IhJIDPDC IM Turn ICAKinC 








1981. . . 














1,068 


21 


5,048 


12 


6,116 


11 


1982. 


















1,812 


20 


12,843 


9 


14,654 


8 


1933. 


















1,614 


14 


13,109 


9 


14,723 


8 


1984. 


















1,168 


11 


11,434 


11 


12,602 


10 


1985. 


















1,843 


13 


9,501 


10 


11,344 


9 


1986. 












132 


19 


2,061 


10 


24,475 


15 


26,668 


13 


1987. 












77 


41 


2,382 


8 


19,310 


4 


21,768 


4 


1988. 












485 


19 


2,264 


9 


19,276 


3 


22,026 


3 


1989. 












283 


15 


1,494 


7 


18,814 


5 


20,591 


4 


1990. 












117 


23 


1,420 


10 


11, 862 


4 


13,399 


4 


1991. 












150 


16 


3,726 


7 


26,054 


4 


29,931 


4 


1992. 












55 


20 


2,262 


6 


19,986 


3 


22,304 


3 


1993. 












176 


16 


2,336 


5 


19,026 


3 


21,538 


3 


1994. 












425 


11 


2,319 


6 


19,438 


3 


22,181 


3 


1995. 












579 


19 


3,425 


5 


20,610 


3 


24,615 


3 


1996. 












304 


19 


1,976 


5 


18,282 


3 


20,563 


3 


YEAR 


STRIPED BASS 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Ml mOCDC IM Tuni ICAMnC 










1981. . . 


ev 


23 


244 


18 


557 


57 





100 


869 


37 


1982. 






790 


51 


211 


24 








48 


54 


1,048 


39 


1983. 






135 


24 


548 


28 


12 


70 








695 


22 


1984. 






227 


37 


310 


18 


7 


58 


8 


58 


553 


18 


1985. 






255 


28 


253 


22 


46 


48 


35 


49 


590 


16 


1986. 






494 


35 


602 


23 


15 


47 


32 


34 


1,142 


20 


1987. 






268 


17 


484 


20 


1 


42 


7 


63 


760 


14 


1988. 






299 


13 


776 


37 


23 


28 


35 


32 


1,133 


26 


1989. 






401 


10 


837 


27 


4 


50 


15 


44 


1,257 


18 


1990. 






559 


10 


1,257 


11 








157 


26 


1,974 


8 


1991. 






902 


16 


2,421 


11 


12 


75 


97 


24 


3,432 


9 


1992. 






1,341 


8 


2,326 


8 


11 


56 


162 


22 


3, 840 


6 


1993. 






1,692 


9 


3,080 


9 


13 


40 


15 


25 


4,900 


6 


1994. 






3,243 


7 


5,241 


9 


22 


23 


15 


34 


8,636 


6 


1995. 






5,190 


7 


5,405 


8 


63 


13 


30 


30 


10,839 


5 


1996. 






6,799 


8 


6,987 


7 


297 


9 


18 


24 


14,101 


5 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE;~EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



45 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) WITH PSE (%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1981-1996 FOR THE 
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 











SUMMER FLOUNDER 






TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










NU'*""^^'^ "^' T"-"^! ICAMnC 








1981. . . 


351 


23 


12,286 


8 


966 


20 








13,603 


8 


1982. 






1,788 


13 


19,256 


32 


2,547 


14 








23,591 


26 


1983. 






1,240 


17 


29,435 


8 


1,435 


17 








32,110 


7 


1984. 






1,003 


13 


26,729 


7 


2,167 


22 








29,900 


6 


1985. 






430 


31 


11,975 


12 


1,121 


16 








13,526 


10 


1986. 






4,072 


16 


19,946 


6 


1,289 


26 








25,316 


5 


1987. 






945 


13 


19,450 


4 


686 


14 








21,082 


4 


1988. 






577 


11 


15,089 


4 


1,556 


11 








17,223 


3 


1989. 






179 


12 


1,980 


6 


534 


11 








2,694 


5 


1990. 






213 


13 


7,613 


4 


1,288 


9 








9, 114 


3 


1991. 






278 


10 


14,859 


4 


1,074 


6 








16,211 


4 


1992. 






430 


9 


11, 054 


4 


435 


9 








11, 918 


3 


1993. 






551 


9 


21,815 


4 


553 


7 








22,919 


4 


1994. 






1,019 


7 


16,317 


4 


404 


7 








17,741 


3 


1995. 






833 


9 


15,244 


4 


162 


9 








16,239 


4 


1996. 






1,426 


7 


17,981 


3 


394 


7 








19,801 


3 


YEAR 


TAUTOG 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










N(j|\^ncDC ]Kr Tunr icami-ic 










1981. . . 


594 


24 


1,444 


19 


12 


48 








2,051 


15 


1982. 






1,545 


14 


1,719 


13 


15 


76 








3,279 


9 


1983. 






1,358 


12 


1,978 


14 


38 


67 








3,375 


9 


1984. 






1,371 


11 


1,394 


13 














2,764 


9 


1985. 






493 


15 


2,723 


15 


9 


61 








3,224 


13 


1986. 






3,457 


11 


4,655 


19 


14 


70 








8,126 


12 


1987. 






1,312 


14 


3,416 


11 


4 


41 








4,732 


9 


1988. 






1,485 


11 


2,782 


11 


4 


53 








4,272 


8 


1989. 






870 


9 


2,709 


7 


16 


23 








3,594 


6 


1990. 






625 


8 


3,090 


6 


7 


34 








3,737 


5 


1991. 






977 


9 


4,203 


5 


7 


44 








5, 187 


5 


1992. 






1,241 


10 


2,945 


7 


9 


30 








4,195 


6 


1993. 






718 


8 


3,491 


7 


5 


22 








4,215 


6 


1994. 






729 


10 


1,921 


8 


3 


32 








2,653 


7 


1995. 






583 


11 


3,228 


8 


4 


31 








3, 816 


7 


1996. 






547 


9 


1,726 


8 


7 


31 








2,279 


6 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:-EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



46 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) WITH PSE (%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1981-1996 FOR THE 
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


VERMILION SNAPPER 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










l^ljk/iocDC iM Turn ICAMnC 








1981. . . 














20 


38 


132 


20 


151 


18 


1982. 


















351 


30 


518 


20 


869 


17 


1983. 


















319 


39 


137 


16 


456 


28 


1984. 


















267 


19 


193 


22 


460 


14 


1985. 


















676 


26 


352 


33 


1,028 


21 


198G. 


















56 


32 


658 


22 


714 


20 


1987. 


















130 


36 


700 


33 


831 


28 


1988. 


















150 


23 


933 


14 


1,083 


12 


1989. 


















294 


20 


568 


17 


861 


13 


1990. 


















190 


30 


593 


20 


783 


17 


1991. 


















213 


25 


1,020 


15 


1,233 


13 


1992. 


















138 


19 


812 


8 


950 


8 


1993. 


















139 


17 


1, 090 


8 


1,228 


7 


1994. 


















119 


13 


706 


9 


826 


8 


1995. 


















171 


23 


1,029 


8 


1,200 


8 


1996. 


















110 


18 


357 


9 


467 


8 


YEAR 


WEAKFISH 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










MI IK^DCDC IM TUni ICAMnC 










1981. . . 


46 


31 


9,341 


INUIV 

35 


243 


33 








9,629 


34 


1982. 






30 


49 


1,709 


16 


305 


33 








2, 046 


14 


1983. 






84 


52 


5,095 


14 


737 


21 








5,916 


12 


1984. 






9 


65 


2,744 


14 


1, 016 


29 








3,769 


13 


1985. 






20 


55 


2,422 


10 


334 


29 








2,776 


9 


1986. 






12 


54 


9,745 


8 


1,217 


21 








10,974 


7 


1987. 






1 


59 


4,915 


11 


804 


17 








5,720 


10 


1988. 






1 


100 


5,796 


12 


650 


15 








6,446 


11 


1989. 












1,292 


9 


382 


12 








1,675 


7 


1990. 









63 


1,472 


6 


199 


15 








1,672 


6 


1991. 






21 


38 


2,253 


8 


328 


18 








2,601 


7 


1992. 






10 


65 


1,456 


8 


201 


11 








1,668 


7 


1993. 






2 


43 


1,828 


7 


388 


10 








2,219 


6 


1994. 






1 


100 


4,290 


6 


638 


9 








4,929 


5 


1995. 






2 


53 


5,359 


6 


378 


10 








5,739 


5 


1996. 






1 


53 


7,250 


5 


343 


10 








7,594 


5 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:--EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



47 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) WITH PSE {%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1981-1996 FOR THE 
ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 









WINTER FLOUNDER 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










jsJU^^^^^^ '^' TwrM ICAMnC 








1981. . . 


7,740 


12 


9,719 


11 








a. 







17,459 


8 


1982. 






11,531 


28 


7, 055 


10 














18,587 


18 


1983 . 






5,027 


9 


8,134 


11 


1 


100 








13,163 


8 


1984. 






4,854 


9 


15,032 


11 














19,886 


8 


1985. 






6,953 


12 


14,612 


18 














21,566 


13 


1986. 






4,702 


20 


5,582 


7 














10,284 


10 


1987. 






4,980 


12 


7,289 


10 














12,269 


8 


1988. 






2,932 


13 


8,186 


10 














11,118 


8 


1989. 






3,835 


25 


4,233 


29 














8,068 


19 


1990. 






1, 816 


11 


2,816 


7 














4,632 


6 


1991. 






849 


11 


3,713 


10 














4,562 


9 


1992. 






413 


10 


1,131 


10 














1,544 


8 


1993 . 






651 


9 


2,930 


23 














3,582 


19 


1994. 






486 


9 


1,814 


13 














2,300 


11 


1995. 






473 


14 


1,851 


10 














2,324 


9 


1996. 






400 


10 


2,514 


14 














2,913 


12 


YEAR 


ALL FISHES 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










NUM'"^'-"^ "^' "TH'^ii iCAMnc 










1981. . . 


36,982 


5 


100,820 


7 


44,482 


5 


87,391 


8 


269,674 


4 


1982. 






46,749 


8 


81,150 


9 


64, 150 


6 


113,332 


3 


305,381 


3 


1983. 






35,200 


8 


125, 023 


4 


62, 990 


3 


146, 166 


4 


369,379 


2 


1984. 






24,583 


4 


101,110 


3 


59,767 


3 


133,865 


4 


319,325 


2 


1985. 






41,080 


8 


90, 846 


4 


67,175 


5 


101,201 


5 


300,302 


3 


1986. 






49, 886 


5 


153, 940 


4 


59,416 


5 


144,077 


3 


407,319 


2 


1987. 






34,294 


5 


99,922 


3 


50,300 


3 


101,561 


2 


286,078 


2 


1988. 






25,723 


6 


77, 895 


3 


56,083 


3 


130,954 


2 


290,654 


1 


1989. 






24,575 


5 


64,578 


3 


46,053 


2 


113,907 


3 


249,113 


2 


1990. 






18,654 


3 


84,593 


2 


40,779 


2 


106,377 


3 


250,402 


2 


1991. 






26,689 


4 


125,999 


2 


54,952 


2 


177,341 


3 


384, 980 


1 


1992. 






17,738 


4 


75, 026 


2 


54,094 


2 


145,025 


2 


291,884 


1 


1993. 






20, 991 


3 


97,574 


2 


50,887 


2 


147,332 


2 


316,784 


1 


1994. 






25, 880 


8 


94, 945 


2 


72,173 


1 


148,856 


3 


341,854 


1 


1995. 






21,983 


5 


88,522 


2 


65,240 


1 


135, 781 


3 


311,526 


1 


1996. 






23,427 


4 


86,419 


2 


51,257 


2 


118,625 


2 


279,728 


1 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:-EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



48 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1981-1996 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


ATLANTIC COD 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID-ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 




- 




J 


HOUSANDS OF POUNC 


)S - - 












^ 






1981. . . 


15,182 


22 


2,542 


16 














17,725 


19 


1982. 






12,464 


26 


9,070 


34 














21,534 


21 


1983. 






13, 112 


22 


1,472 


38 














14,584 


20 


1984. 






5,425 


12 


515 


26 














5,940 


11 


1985. 






22, 525 


58 


554 


26 














23,078 


56 


1986. 






7,237 


34 


290 


22 














7,527 


33 


1987. 






8,135 


20 


852 


26 














8,987 


18 


1988. 






8,186 


20 


3, 919 


22 














12,105 


15 


1989. 






5,155 


12 


1, 955 


21 














7, 110 


10 


1990. 






6,790 


17 


1,121 


18 














7, 911 


15 


1991. 






8, 844 


17 


463 


23 














9, 307 


17 


1992. 






1,906 


18 


430 


26 














2,335 


16 


1993. 






5,190 


17 


1, 949 


20 














7, 139 


14 


1994. 






4,083 


25 


203 


27 














4,285 


24 


1995. 






3,437 


20 


1,164 


17 














4,601 


16 


1996. 






3,260 


21 


72 


27 














3,332 


20 


YEAR 




ATLANTIC CROAKER 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID-ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Tum icAMnc np cm imp 


3S 








1981. . . 








538 


19 


809 


17 


1,735 


19 


3,082 


12 


1982. 












526 


58 


1, 132 


17 


3, 143 


20 


4,800 


15 


1983. 












518 


25 


946 


21 


1, 828 


14 


3,292 


11 


1984. 












721 


17 


2,684 


19 


1,419 


18 


4,824 


12 


1985. 












861 


13 


1,076 


15 


1,228 


15 


3,164 


8 


1986. 












2,153 


11 


3,105 


29 


2,806 


14 


8,064 


13 


1987. 












1,498 


9 


1,437 


18 


1, 193 


22 


4,128 


9 


1988. 












3,318 


13 


1,327 


14 


1,643 


39 


6,288 


13 


1989. 












1,349 


8 


1,029 


10 


449 


19 


2,827 


6 


1990. 












913 


13 


804 


10 


771 


29 


2,488 


10 


1991. 












1,860 


11 


688 


11 


1,888 


44 


4,437 


19 


1992. 












1,826 


10 


802 


7 


569 


13 


3, 197 


7 


1993. 












2,481 


9 


537 


8 


593 


10 


3,611 


6 


1994. 












4,019 


6 


851 


9 


602 


17 


5,472 


5 


1995. 












3,374 


8 


661 


18 


392 


18 


4,426 


7 


1996. 












3,815 


8 


413 


9 


433 


12 


4,661 


7 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:-EST = ESTIMATE. PSE {%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



49 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1981-1996 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 









ATLANTIC MACKEREL 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








TMni iCAMnc nc Dm iMne 










1981. . . 


1,911 


22 


5,166 


21 














7, 077 


16 


1982. 






844 


31 


1,781 


28 














2,625 


22 


1983. 






1, 093 


19 


5,487 


34 


38 


72 








6,618 


28 


1984. 






1,726 


17 


3,387 


27 














5,113 


19 


1985. 






4,197 


31 


1,784 


76 














5,982 


32 


1985. 






2,128 


32 


7,183 


31 














9,311 


25 


1987. 






2,G23 


23 


6,265 


23 














8, 889 


17 


1988. 






5,669 


21 


1,511 


42 


18 











7,198 


18 


1989. 






2,444 


12 


1,495 


24 














3,939 


12 


1990. 






2,638 


14 


1,478 


26 














4, 116 


13 


1991. 






3, 576 


17 


2,080 


21 














5,657 


13 


1992. 






530 


14 


96 


35 














629 


13 


1993. 






1,255 


12 


66 


44 














1,326 


12 


1994. 






3,675 


16 


85 


52 














3,760 


16 


1995. 






1, 847 


13 


907 


36 














2, 754 


15 


1996. 






2,699 


12 


422 


25 


2 


59 








3,123 


11 


YEAR 


BLACK DRUM 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE {%) 








Tuoi icAMnc r\c Dm iMnc 










1981. . . 








95 





122 


21 


1,065 


18 


1,283 


15 


1982. 


















276 


26 


2,600 


18 


2,876 


16 


1983. 












1,378 


21 


397 


22 


3,020 


19 


4,796 


14 


1984. 












39 





586 


23 


1,385 


22 


2, Oil 


16 


1985. 












345 


36 


572 


21 


1,506 


23 


2,424 


16 


1986. 












722 


20 


469 


21 


2,817 


19 


4,008 


14 


1987. 












463 


32 


388 


17 


3,799 


35 


4,651 


29 


1988. 












36 





428 


20 


2,222 


12 


2,686 


11 


1989. 












247 


29 


222 


37 


1,903 


16 


2,372 


14 


1990. 












11 


79 


181 


36 


832 


22 


1,023 


19 


1991. 












84 


1 


549 


20 


1,219 


22 


1, 852 


16 


1992. 












238 


39 


566 


15 


1,549 


8 


2,352 


8 


1993 . 












2 


42 


428 


13 


1,478 


13 


1,908 


11 


1994 . 












3 


74 


693 


13 


1, 177 


20 


1, 873 


13 


1995. 












155 


42 


658 


16 


1,307 


9 


2, 121 


8 


1996. 












99 


67 


568 


13 


1,159 


8 


1,826 


8 



(1) 

NOTE: 



GULF OF MEXICO 
-EST = ESTIMATE, 



ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 
PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



50 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1981-1996 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


BLACK SEA BASS 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST i PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










_ , . THO' iCAMnc r»c Dm iKinc 










1981. . . 


143 


15 


1,060 


16 


759 


19 


265 


75 


2,229 


13 


1982. 






319 


26 


9,568 


36 


1, 872 


17 


404 


20 


12,163 


28 


1983. 






294 


23 


3,760 


21 


907 


21 


128 


26 


5,088 


16 


1984. 






66 


31 


1,165 


14 


2,333 


16 


197 


24 


3,761 


11 


1985. 






48 


37 


2,036 


14 


1,328 


16 


1,834 


34 


5,246 


14 


1986. 






G39 


22 


11,745 


22 


475 


14 


1,177 


19 


14,037 


18 


1987. 






141 


39 


1, 777 


14 


1, 043 


14 


812 


19 


3,773 


9 


1988. 






245 


28 


2, 610 


16 


1,472 


33 


1,361 


12 


5,687 


12 


1989. 






98 


20 


3,182 


7 


1,155 


21 


1,765 


14 


6,200 


7 


1990. 






47 


24 


2,705 


9 


546 


21 


607 


18 


3,905 


7 


1991. 






63 


42 


4,070 


11 


853 


15 


488 


14 


5,475 


8 


1992. 






30 


18 


2,570 


8 


727 


10 


417 


10 


3,744 


6 


1993. 






49 


16 


4,776 


22 


560 


16 


509 


16 


5,894 


18 


1994. 






37 


53 


2,890 


13 


623 


17 


531 


11 


4,081 


10 


1995. 






64 


27 


6,099 


14 


588 


12 


288 


11 


7,040 


12 


1996. 






85 


19 


5,812 


15 


654 


13 


249 


11 


6,801 


13 


YEAR 


BLUEFISH 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










THO 


JSANDS OF POUNDS - 
















1 n\j 








1981. . . 


29,632 


22 


59,148 


7 


6, 507 


21 


580 


34 


95,867 


8 


1982. 






41,226 


19 


34,978 


13 


6,802 


18 


418 


27 


83,424 


11 


1983. 






33,988 


22 


38,431 


15 


16,703 


32 


3,589 


32 


92,711 


12 


1984. 






18,985 


13 


38,066 


12 


10,402 


17 


880 


78 


68,333 


8 


1985. 






17,205 


21 


28,339 


13 


6,970 


22 


665 


32 


53,180 


10 


1986. 






38,718 


9 


48,710 


10 


5,459 


13 


856 


25 


93,742 


6 


1987. 






20,930 


10 


48,407 


6 


7,316 


12 


551 


18 


77,204 


5 


1988. 






11,726 


7 


27,996 


7 


8,501 


14 


1,171 


13 


49,393 


5 


1989. 






11,332 


10 


23,183 


5 


4,744 


13 


1,724 


25 


40,984 


5 


1990. 






10,487 


9 


16,697 


5 


3,372 


8 


356 


18 


30,913 


4 


1991. 






12, 199 


8 


17,672 


6 


3,127 


10 


969 


28 


33,966 


4 


1992. 






8,414 


8 


13,365 


6 


2,496 


10 


506 


15 


24,782 


4 


1993. 






9,209 


6 


8,735 


7 


2,348 


7 


349 


22 


20,641 


4 


1994. 






7,996 


8 


6,284 


8 


1,261 


6 


451 


21 


15,992 


5 


1995. 






5,992 


8 


6,973 


9 


1,209 


9 


600 


26 


14,775 


5 


1996. 






6,644 


14 


7,050 


10 


1,040 


8 


354 


14 


15,089 


8 



(1 ) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:--EST = ESTIMATE^ PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



51 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1981-1996 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


DOLPHIN 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










JH 


DUSANDS OF POUNDS 


















1981. . . 














4,918 


23 


550 


20 


5,469 


21 


1982. 












1 





3,788 


14 


3,249 


38 


7, 038 


19 


1983. 












51 


38 


6,152 


17 


665 


24 


6,868 


15 


1984. 


















3,423 


19 


983 


30 


4,406 


16 


1985. 












79 


31 


5,537 


23 


1,280 


30 


6,895 


20 


1986. 












183 


37 


6,784 


17 


2, 984 


22 


9,952 


14 


1987. 












73 


32 


4,350 


11 


2, 739 


22 


7,162 


11 


1988. 






1 





145 





6,302 


14 


1,158 


18 


7,606 


12 


1989. 












806 


24 


9,810 


9 


2,882 


20 


13,499 


8 


1990. 












349 


32 


7,331 


13 


5,096 


30 


12,777 


14 


1991. 






8 





555 


18 


11,198 


8 


5,448 


15 


17,209 


7 


1992. 












692 


29 


5,154 


8 


3,945 


23 


9,791 


10 


1993. 






143 


21 


1, 783 


40 


5,368 


6 


3,524 


13 


10, 818 


9 


1994. 












393 


30 


9,619 


8 


2,765 


15 


12,778 


7 


1995. 












754 


27 


12,142 


5 


6,896 


9 


19,792 


5 


1996. 












522 


49 


7,387 


6 


4,640 


12 


12,549 


6 










GAG 




TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH A 


riANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










THOl K^fiMi^c or on] imhc _ 








1981. . . 














86 


50 


332 


22 


418 


20 


1982. 


















3 





1,308 


20 


1,311 


20 


1983. 


















91 


59 


1,483 


18 


1,574 


17 


1984. 


















406 


32 


2,642 


62 


3,048 


54 


1985. 


















161 


36 


1,667 


22 


1,828 


21 


1986. 


















45 


49 


627 


22 


672 


21 


1987. 


















504 


36 


978 


15 


1,482 


16 


1988. 


















222 


22 


1,410 


18 


1,632 


16 


1989. 


















430 


26 


960 


16 


1,391 


14 


1990. 


















349 


46 


1,432 


28 


1,781 


24 


1991. 


















220 


23 


2,114 


16 


2,334 


15 


1992. 


















476 


16 


1,729 


9 


2,205 


8 


1993. 


















544 


22 


2,282 


8 


2,827 


8 


1994. 


















561 


21 


1,947 


9 


2,507 


9 


1995. 


















303 


19 


2,628 


8 


2,930 


8 


1996. 


















278 


21 


1,964 


8 


2,242 


8 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTEl-EST = ESTIMATE, PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



52 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1981-1996 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


GRAY SNAPPER 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Tum iCAwnc nc Dm imrq 










1981. . . 














601 


52 


671 


27 


1,272 


28 


1982. 


















140 


20 


844 


17 


983 


15 


1983. 


















282 


24 


945 


21 


1,227 


17 


1984. 


















219 


20 


3,623 


30 


3, 843 


28 


1985. 


















733 


30 


1,538 


24 


2,272 


19 


1986. 


















172 


20 


1,148 


17 


1,320 


15 


1987. 


















281 


22 


1, 161 


37 


1,442 


30 


1988. 


















342 


15 


746 


16 


1,089 


12 


1989. 


















234 


IS 


1,356 


12 


1,590 


11 


1990. 


















245 


19 


1,144 


19 


1,389 


16 


1991. 


















366 


16 


1,690 


12 


2, 056 


10 


1992. 


















369 


12 


1,091 


7 


1,460 


6 


1993. 


















245 


13 


1,124 


8 


1,369 


7 


1994. 


















281 


10 


1,136 


9 


1,417 


8 


1995. 


















320 


14 


1,058 


8 


1,378 


7 


1996. 


















231 


13 


955 


8 


1,187 


7 


YEAR 




GRAY TRIGGERFISH 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








xuoi iCAMnc (~ic Dm iMnc _ 










1981. . . 














82 


38 


648 


39 


730 


35 


1982. 












1 





139 


26 


1,010 


24 


1,151 


22 


1983. 












12 


72 


64 


43 


239 


18 


315 


17 


1984. 






6 











78 


21 


112 


21 


196 


15 


1985. 












24 


82 


74 


29 


183 


28 


281 


21 


1986. 






7 





17 


38 


49 


26 


1,338 


25 


1,411 


23 


1987. 












69 


40 


36 


25 


1,666 


33 


1,772 


31 


1988. 












6 


78 


72 


24 


1,366 


15 


1,445 


14 


1989. 






3 





119 


34 


257 


35 


1,422 


15 


1,800 


13 


1990. 












52 


23 


208 


28 


2,095 


18 


2,355 


16 


1991. 






3 


53 


137 


26 


165 


21 


2,121 


14 


2,426 


13 


1992. 












32 


25 


273 


17 


1,325 


9 


1, 631 


8 


1993. 






1 





106 


25 


177 


17 


1,182 


11 


1,465 


9 


1994. 






2 


78 


39 


32 


142 


13 


1,165 


11 


1,348 


10 


1995. 












65 


32 


97 


15 


1,017 


9 


1,179 


8 


1996. 






1 


65 


155 


43 


183 


15 


496 


11 


836 


11 



(1 ) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:--EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



53 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1981-1996 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


GREATER AMBERJACK 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








__ Tu/^r ic AMnc nir orii imrc 










1981. . . 














1,344 


17 


568 


43 


1,912 


17 


1982. 


















494 


48 


3,380 


20 


3,874 


18 


1983 . 


















207 


25 


2,015 


18 


2,222 


17 


1984. 












335 





1,439 


26 


955 


27 


2,730 


17 


1985. 


















1,347 


25 


1,323 


20 


2,670 


16 


1986. 












664 


30 


1,568 


21 


7,540 


20 


9,773 


16 


1987. 












242 


60 


2,641 


42 


5,240 


20 


8,123 


19 


1988. 












68 





1,787 


24 


2,501 


23 


4,356 


16 


1989. 












207 


39 


1,626 


29 


4,563 


22 


6,395 


17 


1990. 












357 


51 


981 


22 


690 


33 


2,027 


18 


1991. 












20 


52 


1,042 


20 


2, 891 


19 


3,953 


15 


1992. 












25 


63 


1,102 


13 


2,659 


12 


3,787 


9 


1993. 












254 


23 


578 


21 


3,498 


17 


4,330 


14 


1994. 


















1,626 


19 


1,562 


16 


3,188 


12 


1995. 


















623 


21 


811 


15 


1,434 


13 


199S. 












6 


57 


970 


14 


994 


10 


1,970 


9 


YEAR 




KING MACKEREL 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Tuni icAMnc nc doi iMnc _ 










1981. . . 








10 





4,394 


1 vy.-.iiu>v., - 

30 


1,622 


8 


6,026 


22 


1982. 


















6,807 


12 


5,755 


71 


12,562 


33 


1983. 


















7,438 


21 


2,077 


32 


9,515 


18 


1984. 


















6,612 


16 


3,133 


27 


9,744 


14 


1985. 












6 





7,562 


24 


1,104 


19 


8,671 


21 


1986. 












109 


34 


6,206 


10 


1,723 


19 


8,037 


9 


1987. 












44 


41 


5,402 


11 


2,878 


11 


8,324 


8 


1988. 












137 


29 


5,810 


11 


2,919 


12 


8,866 


8 


1989. 












67 


20 


3,917 


10 


2,630 


16 


6,614 


9 


1990. 












30 





4,225 


8 


3,168 


14 


7,422 


8 


1991. 






2 





53 


31 


5,183 


7 


4,325 


13 


9,563 


7 


1992. 












58 


30 


7, 017 


9 


3,135 


9 


10,210 


7 


1993 . 












141 


50 


4,285 


7 


4,119 


8 


8,545 


5 


1994. 












11 


41 


4,176 


7 


4,634 


8 


8,821 


5 


1995. 












15 





5,008 


7 


4,697 


7 


9,719 


5 


1996. 












7 


71 


4,314 


6 


5,700 


7 


10,020 


5 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:-EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



54 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1981-1996 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 















RED DRUM 






TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










THr>i icAMric nc oni imrc 










1981. . . 








352 


60 


409 


38 


3,127 


14 


3,888 


13 


1982. 


















911 


20 


6,415 


18 


7,326 


16 


1933. 












54 


44 


1,075 


16 


6,878 


13 


8,008 


11 


1984. 












1 





2,615 


41 


6,879 


15 


9,496 


15 


1985. 


















2,203 


32 


5,435 


14 


7,638 


13 


1986. 












900 


57 


1,065 


13 


5,189 


9 


7,154 


10 


1987. 












44 


90 


1,592 


12 


4, 569 


11 


6,206 


9 


1988. 












9 


71 


1,900 


16 


2,932 


8 


4,841 


8 


1989. 












30 


34 


885 


12 


5,741 


8 


6,655 


7 


1990. 












3 


100 


1,355 


29 


4,053 


9 


5,411 


10 


1991. 












36 


32 


1,247 


12 


5,362 


9 


6,645 


8 


1992. 












55 


44 


1, 116 


10 


7,801 


4 


8,972 


4 


1993. 












46 


11 


1,168 


8 


8,710 


5 


9,924 


5 


1994. 












4 





1,439 


9 


7,528 


5 


8, 970 


4 


1995. 












66 





1,661 


11 


11,939 


4 


13,665 


4 


1996. 












2 





1,333 


8 


11,708 


5 


13,043 


4 


YEAR 


RED SNAPPER 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










_ _ . _ _ THOl i*^AMnc np om imhc _ 










1981. . . 














383 


33 


3,999 


26 


4,382 


24 


1982. 


















158 


27 


2,198 


19 


2,356 


18 


1983. 


















199 


27 


4,128 


20 


4,327 


20 


1984. 


















454 


17 


1,426 


23 


1,880 


18 


1985. 


















1,336 


29 


2,457 


22 


3,792 


18 


1986. 


















114 


27 


2,425 


17 


2,538 


17 


1987. 


















134 


20 


1,647 


27 


1,780 


25 


1988. 


















225 


23 


1,899 


22 


2,124 


19 


1989. 


















269 


28 


1,814 


22 


2,083 


19 


1990. 


















115 


8 


1,060 


16 


1,175 


14 


1991. 


















132 


34 


1, 503 


13 


1,635 


13 


1992. 


















618 


38 


2,613 


8 


3,231 


10 


1993. 


















142 


27 


4,136 


7 


4,278 


7 


1994. 


















201 


36 


3, 734 


8 


3,935 


8 


1995. 


















67 


20 


2,876 


8 


2,943 


8 


1996. 


















102 


35 


2,617 


8 


2,719 


8 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:--EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



55 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1981-1996 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 









SAND SEATROUT 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










TH*^' icAMnc nc oni jKinc 










1981. . . 




















4,073 


41 


4,073 


41 


1982. 
























1,249 


18 


1,249 


18 


1983. 
























2,486 


22 


2,486 


22 


1984. 
























3,032 


27 


3, 032 


27 


1985. 
























5, 094 


20 


5,094 


20 


1986. 
























3, 047 


9 


3,047 


9 


1987. 
























2,014 


10 


2,014 


10 


1988. 
























1,561 


11 


1,561 


11 


1989. 
























1,455 


18 


1,455 


18 


1990. 
























1,835 


14 


1,835 


14 


1991. 
























2,709 


13 


2, 709 


13 


1992. 
























1,643 


10 


1,643 


10 


1993 . 
























2, 090 


10 


2,090 


10 


1994. 
























2,884 


6 


2, 884 


6 


1995. 
























2,002 


8 


2, 002 


8 


1996. 
























1,889 


8 


1, 889 


8 


YEAR 


SOUP 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










THOl iCAMnc nc Dm iKrnc _ 










1981. . . 


2,586 


15 


3,225 


44 


3 


1 








5, 815 


25 


1982. 






4,281 


14 


924 


24 


2 


62 








5,206 


12 


1983. 






2,502 


14 


3,750 


21 





69 








6,252 


14 


1984. 






1,185 


16 


1,230 


27 














2,416 


16 


1985. 






3,243 


19 


2,850 


18 


3 


78 








6,096 


13 


1986. 






7,525 


13 


4, 080 


14 


5 











11,610 


10 


1987. 






4,853 


17 


1,343 


20 


1 











6,197 


14 


1988. 






3,383 


11 


883 


25 


1 


9 








4,268 


10 


1989. 






3,564 


11 


1,990 


9 


4 


21 








5,558 


8 


1990. 






1,746 


14 


2,394 


9 


1 











4,140 


8 


1991. 






5, 003 


8 


3, 082 


9 


3 


35 








8,088 


6 


1992. 






2,300 


10 


2,102 


11 


10 


21 








4,412 


8 


1993. 






2,275 


13 


920 


12 


4 


18 








3,198 


10 


1994. 






1,542 


16 


1,076 


15 


10 


57 








2,629 


12 


1995. 






1,013 


13 


299 


29 


1 


54 








1,313 


12 


1996. 






1,618 


10 


621 


14 














2,239 


8 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:-EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



56 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1981-1996 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


SHEEPSHEAD 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Tuni icAMnc nc onr rMnc 








1981. . . 








17 





480 


22 


1,031 


24 


1,528 


18 


1982. 


















1,875 


17 


1,962 


13 


3,837 


11 


1983. 












2 





735 


21 


3,288 


20 


4,026 


17 


1984. 


















1, 857 


14 


2,812 


15 


4,669 


10 


1985. 


















888 


23 


2,939 


23 


3,827 


18 


1986. 


















1,402 


14 


2,279 


30 


3,680 


19 


1987. 












76 


73 


1,891 


16 


1,762 


12 


3,730 


10 


1988. 












2 





1,569 


13 


4,382 


10 


5,953 


8 


1989. 


















921 


12 


4,953 


12 


5,874 


10 


1990. 


















1,243 


13 


2,478 


14 


3,721 


10 


1991. 












2 





2,019 


11 


3,068 


14 


5,089 


10 


1992. 


















2,466 


10 


4,897 


6 


7,363 


5 


1993. 


















1,879 


13 


4,577 


6 


6,456 


6 


1994. 


















2,902 


10 


2,734 


8 


5,636 


6 


1995. 












9 


77 


2,597 


11 


4,901 


6 


7, 507 


6 


1996. 












B 


58 


1,702 


8 


3,348 


6 


5,055 


5 


YEAR 


SOUTHERN FLOUNDER 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE {%) 








Turn icAMnc nc Dm iMnc _ 








1981. . . 














160 


1 \^^i-i^^ - 

30 


822 


22 


982 


19 


1982. 












106 


72 


827 


59 


827 


15 


1,760 


29 


1983. 


















393 


17 


3,055 


39 


3,448 


35 


1984. 












3 





421 


12 


359 


15 


783 


9 


1985. 












4 


65 


560 


13 


837 


22 


1,401 


14 


1986. 












1 





538 


15 


2,619 


21 


3, 159 


18 


1987. 


















289 


11 


415 


12 


706 


8 


1988. 












12 


36 


475 


14 


861 


10 


1,348 


8 


1989. 


















522 


21 


515 


18 


1,038 


14 


1990. 


















503 


12 


855 


15 


1,358 


11 


1991. 












2 





645 


12 


932 


10 


1,579 


7 


1992. 












4 


60 


818 


9 


814 


8 


1,637 


6 


1993. 


















693 


8 


655 


9 


1,348 


6 


1994. 


















1,132 


7 


664 


8 


1,796 


5 


1995. 


















924 


9 


715 


8 


1,639 


6 


1996. 












1 





478 


11 


780 


8 


1,258 


7 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:-EST = ESTIMATE, PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



37 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1981-1996 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


SPANISH MACKEREL 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Twrii iCAMnc r»c om imrc 










1981. . . 














1,290 


20 


1,733 


15 


3,023 


12 


1982. 


















1,209 


24 


2,794 


20 


4,004 


16 


1983. 


















227 


29 


2,646 


16 


2,873 


15 


1984. 


















1,398 


31 


1,061 


22 


2,458 


20 


1985. 


















698 


21 


1, 197 


12 


1,895 


11 


1986. 












13 


58 


1,195 


14 


6, 789 


15 


7, 997 


13 


1987. 












19 


48 


1,685 


7 


2,925 


10 


4,630 


7 


1988. 












160 


39 


2,939 


7 


2,052 


9 


5,151 


6 


1989. 






1 





120 


23 


1,386 


7 


1,560 


8 


3,066 


6 


1990. 












95 


24 


1,630 


7 


2,367 


8 


4,092 


6 


1991. 






44 


34 


189 


15 


2,240 


7 


2,520 


8 


4,992 


5 


1992. 












107 


17 


1,841 


6 


3,423 


6 


5,371 


4 


1993. 






1 





175 


18 


1,262 


7 


1,941 


7 


3,378 


5 


1994. 












214 


14 


1,158 


6 


1,762 


6 


3,135 


4 


1S95. 












145 


29 


672 


8 


1,630 


9 


2,447 


6 


1996. 












81 


46 


986 


9 


1,637 


7 


2, 704 


6 


YEAR 


SPOT 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








"ri-io 


JSANDS OF POUNDS - 






















1981. . . 








5,216 


15 


1,700 


18 


42 


53 


6,957 


12 


1982. 












2,324 


17 


1,662 


10 


16 


27 


4,002 


11 


1983. 












2,879 


21 


2,119 


19 


30 


48 


5,029 


15 


1984. 












776 


18 


1,024 


13 


6 


5 


1,806 


11 


1985. 












2,156 


9 


3,788 


14 


7 


69 


5,952 


9 


1986. 












2,352 


10 


1,041 


16 


33 


29 


3,426 


8 


1987. 












2,882 


10 


965 


9 


54 


39 


3,901 


8 


1988. 












888 


13 


1,634 


14 


30 


62 


2,553 


10 


1989. 












2,045 


7 


1,249 


8 








3,294 


6 


1990. 












2,912 


9 


672 


9 


54 


83 


3,639 


7 


1991. 












3,432 


8 


1,082 


8 


26 


56 


4,540 


7 


1992. 












3,048 


11 


976 


8 


43 


47 


4,067 


9 


1993. 












1,591 


11 


1,780 


7 


108 


56 


3,479 


7 


1994. 












1, 956 


6 


2,372 


8 


55 


42 


4,383 


5 


1995. 












1,571 


10 


1,536 


7 


50 


42 


3,158 


6 


1996. 












832 


12 


1,214 


12 


5 


51 


2,051 


9 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:-EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



58 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1981-1996 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







SPOTTED SEATROUT 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Turn iCAMnc nc Dm iMnc 










1981. . . 














1,184 


33 


4,652 


14 


5,836 


13 


1982. 
















1,547 


16 


11,440 


10 


12,988 


9 


1983. 
















1,343 


16 


11, 161 


11 


12,505 


10 


1984. 
















1,163 


13 


8,606 


20 


9,770 


17 


1985. 
















2,065 


14 


6,471 


12 


8,536 


10 


1986. 










69 


21 


2,052 


12 


16, 966 


18 


19,087 


16 


1987. 










61 


31 


2,334 


10 


11,865 


5 


14,260 


5 


1988. 










497 


24 


1,829 


10 


12,610 


5 


14, 936 


4 


1989. 










297 


15 


1,474 


9 


12,798 


8 


14,569 


7 


1990. 










160 


32 


1,357 


15 


4, 847 


7 


6,364 


6 


1991. 










157 


19 


3,085 


10 


12,052 


6 


15,294 


5 


1992. 










64 


23 


1,710 


7 


9,545 


5 


11,320 


4 


1993. 










214 


22 


1,554 


7 


8,295 


5 


10,064 


4 


1994. 










202 


14 


1,633 


6 


9,342 


4 


11, 178 


3 


1995. 










178 


18 


2, 030 


8 


10,361 


5 


12,569 


4 


1996. 










78 


22 


803 


8 


9,665 


5 


10,545 


4 


YEAR 


STRIPED BASS 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








THO 


i.«;ANn.9 OF pni iNn.<? - 
























1981. . . 


215 


28 


931 


26 


807 


53 








1,953 


25 


1982. 




2,134 


52 


388 


33 








1 





2,523 


44 


1983. 




596 


31 


2,087 


71 


15 


99 








2,698 


55 


1984. 




138 


50 


1,139 


43 


5 


7 


1 





1,284 


38 


1985. 




407 


54 


414 


36 


25 


50 


3 





849 


31 


1986. 




418 


31 


686 


39 


4 


43 


20 


49 


1,128 


26 


1987. 




356 


31 


499 


20 


2 


40 


5 


59 


862 


17 


1988. 




591 


20 


665 


27 


28 


33 


38 


34 


1,321 


16 


1989. 




470 


22 


262 


26 


8 





1 





742 


17 


1990. 




657 


24 


1,569 


14 








69 


27 


2,295 


12 


1991. 




1, 128 


17 


2,513 


11 


4 





62 


28 


3,706 


9 


1992. 




1,524 


18 


2,494 


13 


21 


15 


28 


36 


4, 067 


10 


1993. 




1,846 


10 


3,803 


12 


16 


38 


1 





5,666 


9 


1994. 




2,284 


10 


4,443 


9 


77 


31 


9 


37 


6,813 


7 


1995. 




2,657 


8 


8,365 


9 


237 


15 


5 


17 


11,264 


7 


1996. 




3,441 


9 


10, 885 


6 


288 


13 


6 


36 


14,619 


5 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:--EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



59 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1981-1996 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 









SUMMER FLOUNDER 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








Tuni icAMnc r>c Dm lunc 










1981. . . 


389 


34 


9,221 


9 


488 


24 








10,098 


8 


1982. 






2,310 


16 


14,314 


32 


1,640 


23 








18,264 


25 


1983. 






1,322 


17 


26,100 


8 


586 


21 








28,008 


7 


1984. 






900 


16 


16,559 


8 


1,378 


29 








18,837 


8 


1985. 






744 


34 


10,883 


12 


863 


21 








12,490 


11 


1986. 






5,880 


19 


10,817 


9 


1,177 


44 








17,885 


9 


1987. 






1,338 


20 


10,634 


10 


257 


11 








12,228 


9 


1988. 






712 


12 


13,302 


4 


644 


9 








14,658 


4 


1989. 






316 


17 


2,559 


7 


301 


13 








3,176 


6 


1990. 






235 


21 


4,376 


5 


531 


11 








5,142 


4 


1991. 






356 


14 


7,370 


4 


432 


16 








8,158 


4 


1992. 






430 


13 


6,459 


5 


267 


8 








7,157 


4 


1993. 






552 


11 


7,812 


5 


479 


7 








8,844 


4 


1994. 






980 


9 


7,886 


4 


481 


7 








9,347 


4 


1995. 






858 


11 


4,394 


5 


251 


23 








5,503 


5 


1996. 






1,232 


8 


8,777 


4 


407 


7 








10,416 


3 


YEAR 






TAUTOG 






TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 1 PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 








xurM icAKinc r\c orM iKinc _ 










1981. . . 


1,698 


26 


2,417 


24 


1 











4,116 


18 


1982. 






4,615 


15 


3,707 


14 


16 


67 








8,338 


10 


1983. 






2,911 


14 


2,818 


19 


21 


67 








5,751 


12 


1984. 






3,277 


16 


2,104 


20 














5,381 


12 


1985. 






1,077 


16 


3,221 


17 


7 


65 








4,305 


14 


1986. 






10,744 


14 


6,159 


13 


4 


60 








16,906 


10 


1987. 






3,365 


17 


5,515 


12 


8 











8,889 


10 


1988. 






3,478 


18 


5,819 


17 


5 


33 








9,302 


13 


1989. 






2,413 


11 


3,935 


9 


31 


35 








6,379 


7 


1990. 






1,485 


11 


3,669 


9 


3 


31 








5,156 


7 


1991. 






2,459 


11 


5,622 


7 


25 


54 








8,105 


6 


1992. 






3,374 


14 


4,285 


10 


13 


35 








7,671 


8 


1993. 






1,673 


10 


4,244 


11 


10 


64 








5,927 


8 


1994. 






1,119 


14 


2,346 


19 


3 











3,468 


13 


1995. 






959 


16 


3,641 


10 


3 


33 








4,604 


9 


1996. 






918 


13 


2,336 


13 


12 


31 








3,266 


10 



(1 ) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:--EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



60 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1981-1996 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 







n 


VERMILION SNAPPER 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC IsOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE(%) 1 EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










TMOi icAKinc r\c Dm iKinc 










1981. . . 











- - 1 n 




5 


43 


86 


21 


91 


20 


1982. 


















233 


34 


271 


20 


504 


19 


1983. 


















416 


45 


64 


19 


480 


39 


1984. 


















210 


17 


155 


21 


365 


13 


1985. 


















435 


26 


246 


64 


681 


29 


1986. 


















11 


31 


932 


40 


944 


39 


1987. 


















207 


41 


491 


30 


699 


24 


1988. 


















135 


28 


467 


17 


602 


14 


1989. 


















106 


23 


411 


20 


517 


17 


1990. 


















121 


28 


518 


26 


639 


22 


1991. 


















105 


26 


829 


22 


934 


20 


1992. 


















118 


22 


602 


10 


720 


9 


1993. 


















98 


23 


759 


11 


857 


10 


1994. 


















73 


19 


608 


13 


681 


12 


1995. 


















44 


21 


564 


11 


608 


10 


199e. 


















79 


45 


229 


14 


309 


15 


YEAR 




WEAKFISH 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










THO iCAKinc nc doi iKinc _ 










1981. . . 


281 


33 


15,724 


16 


99 


27 








16,105 


16 


1982. 






155 


50 


7,792 


16 


339 


43 








8,285 


15 


1983. 






624 


57 


10,403 


13 


703 


21 








11,731 


12 


1984. 






28 


68 


6,424 


23 


562 


47 








7,014 


21 


1985. 






149 


57 


5,025 


11 


315 


28 








5,489 


11 


1986. 






102 


54 


9,464 


10 


575 


19 








10, 142 


9 


1987. 






4 


79 


5,957 


16 


789 


23 








6,750 


14 


1988. 












5,881 


12 


450 


14 








6,332 


11 


1989. 












1, 912 


9 


265 


14 








2, 177 


8 


1990. 






1 


63 


1,215 


9 


131 


14 








1,347 


8 


1991. 












1,919 


8 


212 


20 








2,131 


7 


1992. 






21 


110 


1,258 


9 


120 


16 








1,399 


9 


1993. 






7 


59 


887 


11 


209 


13 








1, 102 


9 


1994. 












1,471 


11 


324 


11 








1,796 


10 


1995. 












1,689 


8 


163 


18 








1,852 


7 


1996. 












2,849 


7 


102 


10 








2,951 


7 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE-EST = ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



61 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1981-1996 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 









WINTER FLOUNDER 


TOTAL 


YEAR 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










TH'^' I'SAMriQ nc oni imrc 








1981. . . 


6,751 


15 


5, 673 


14 














12,424 


10 


1982. 






11,865 


37 


4, 553 


12 














16,417 


27 


1983. 






3,781 


11 


5,857 


14 


2 











9,640 


10 


1984. 






5, 012 


11 


10, 145 


15 














15,157 


11 


1985. 






6,608 


15 


8,765 


24 














15,373 


15 


1986. 






4,039 


19 


3,596 


9 














7,635 


11 


1987. 






5,663 


15 


5,305 


13 














10, 967 


10 


1988. 






3,243 


17 


5,537 


13 














8,780 


10 


1989 . 






3,180 


18 


2,184 


15 














5,363 


12 


1990. 






1,651 


14 


1,505 


10 














3,156 


9 


1991. 






769 


13 


2,131 


13 














2,899 


10 


1992. 






430 


12 


641 


11 














1,072 


8 


1993. 






559 


12 


1,570 


30 














2,130 


22 


1994. 






393 


12 


1, 104 


17 














1,497 


13 


1995. 






389 


23 


1,161 


13 














1,549 


11 


1996. 






328 


12 


1,383 


14 














1,712 


11 


YEAR 


ALL FISHES 


TOTAL 


NORTH ATLANTIC 


MID ATLANTIC 


SOUTH ATLANTIC 


GULF OF MEXICO (1) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST PSE(%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 


EST 


PSE (%) 










THO I'SANinQ nc onr iMnc _ 










1981. . . 


68,790 


11 


118, 575 


5 


37,873 


7 


52, 978 


6 


278,215 


4 


1982. 






85,706 


11 


105,417 


8 


48,533 


4 


75, 703 


7 


315,360 


4 


1983. 






68,382 


12 


124,645 


6 


65,202 


10 


80, 920 


5 


339,150 


4 


1984. 






39,631 


7 


100,531 


6 


50,050 


5 


71,753 


7 


261,966 


3 


1985. 






59,426 


23 


79,398 


7 


59,956 


7 


65,446 


5 


264,227 


6 


1986. 






81, 972 


6 


135,525 


5 


53,561 


5 


96,564 


5 


367,623 


3 


1987. 






55,168 


6 


116,717 


4 


51,555 


5 


66,536 


4 


289,976 


2 


1988. 






39, 726 


6 


85,891 


4 


54,851 


4 


70, 845 


3 


251,314 


2 


1989. 






33, 100 


5 


76, 967 


4 


46,353 


3 


66,904 


3 


223,324 


2 


1990. 






28, 887 


8 


56,797 


4 


35,772 


4 


51,548 


4 


173,004 


2 


1991. 






35,631 


6 


65,186 


3 


47,656 


3 


79,768 


3 


228,241 


2 


1992. 






21,169 


5 


47,334 


3 


44,967 


3 


68,931 


2 


182,401 


2 


1993. 






24,298 


5 


55, 082 


4 


37,346 


2 


68,519 


2 


185,244 


2 


1994. 






23,915 


6 


45,859 


3 


50,089 


3 


63,572 


2 


183,436 


1 


1995. 






19,788 


6 


58,870 


8 


50,444 


2 


73,055 


2 


202,157 


3 


1996. 






21,286 


6 


55,744 


3 


43, 757 


3 


64,567 


2 


185,354 


2 



(1) GULF OF MEXICO ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE TEXAS DATA. 

NOTE:--EST = ESTIMATE. PSE {%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 



62 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (INCLUDING RELEASED ALIVE) WITH PSE (%) 
BY MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1993-1996 FOR THE PACIFIC COAST. 



YEAR 


BARRED SANDBASS 


BARRED SURFPERCH 


BLACK ROCKFISH 


BLUE ROCKFISH 


BOCACCIO 




EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


1993. . 

1994. . 

1995. . 

1996. . 




. - .... Ml 


MBERS IN THOUSANC 


e. .... 




















1,542 
1,487 

1,514 
1,487 


4 
5 
6 
4 


678 
385 
672 
542 


9 

11 
10 
11 


949 
693 
631 
731 


6 

7 
6 
7 


1,862 
544 

440 
520 


7 
7 
7 
7 


147 

179 

24 

53 


14 
14 
18 
16 


YEAR 


BROWN ROCKFISH 


CABEZON 


CALIFORNIA HALIBUT 


CANARY ROCKFISH 


CHILIPEPPER ROCKF. 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


1993. . 

1994. . 

1995. . 

1996. . 




Ml 


MBERS IN THOUSANC 


\e 




















154 
67 
80 

121 


9 

14 
11 
10 


109 
76 
85 

127 


7 

9 

11 

9 


347 
491 
924 
712 


7 
6 
6 
6 


231 
178 
201 

107 


7 

8 

10 

9 


46 
56 
28 
22 


25 
18 
26 

21 


YEAR 


COPPER ROCKFISH 


COR BIN A 


GOPHER ROCKFISH 


GRASS ROCKFISH 


KELP BASS 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


1993. . 

1994. . 

1995. . 

1996. . 






MBERS IN THOUSANC 






















156 

159 

77 

229 


9 

11 

10 

7 


17 
26 
57 
30 


18 

17 
17 
15 


299 

216 
92 

121 


10 
10 
12 
10 


32 

17 
15 
17 


13 
17 
18 
16 


2,610 
1,848 
1,599 
1,556 


5 
4 
6 

5 


YEAR 


KELP GREENLING 


LINGCOD 


PACIFIC BARRACUDA 


PACIFIC BONITO 


PACIFIC COD 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE {%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


1993. . 

1994. . 

1995. . 

1996. . 






JMBERS IN THOUSANC 


ic 




















209 

101 

95 

240 


8 
9 
9 
7 


381 
262 

243 

371 


5 
6 
6 

5 


1,250 

1,765 

1,379 

514 


6 
6 
6 
6 


630 
346 
100 
125 


7 
10 
13 

11 




1 


11 



63 


45 


YEAR 


PAC. CHUB MACKEREL 


PACIFIC SARDINE 


PILE PERCH 


QUILLBACK ROCKFISH 


REDTAIL SURFPERCH 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


1993. . 

1994. . 

1995. . 

1996. . 




Mi IMRPRR IM TUni IRAMn.Q 






4,651 
5,313 
5, 146 
5,507 


4 
4 
5 
4 


329 

368 

73 

271 


17 
42 
38 
22 


33 
31 
29 

157 


19 
13 
25 
22 


34 
9 

5 
61 


34 

14 
24 

11 


69 
90 
91 

110 


17 
17 
14 
22 


YEAR 


SHEEPHEAD (CAL) 


SILVER SURFPERCH 


STRIPED BASS 


STRIPED SEAPERCH 


SURF SMELT 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


1993. . 

1994. . 

1995. . 

1996. . 




Ml 


JMBERS IN THOUSAN[ 


■>c ..... 




















68 
87 
60 

77 


11 
11 
14 
12 


110 
46 

57 
60 


17 
19 
16 
20 


101 
115 
151 
174 


13 

12 

12 

9 


132 
73 
98 

286 


9 

13 
19 
12 


1,632 
1,202 
1,413 
4,807 


26 
28 
25 
25 


YEAR 


WHITE CROAKER 


WHITE STURGEON 


YELLOWTAIL 


YELLOWTAIL ROCKF. 


ALL FISH 


EST 1 PSE {%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


1993. . 

1994. . 

1995. . 

1996. . 






JMBERS IN THOUSAN 






















2,019 

900 

1,408 

1,958 


5 
9 

15 
7 


22 

5 

47 

22 


16 
30 
19 
15 


120 
24 
30 
64 


10 
15 
16 

10 


284 

164 

140 

83 


8 
8 
8 

10 


30,922 
27,169 
27,609 
34,047 


2 
2 
2 

4 



NOTE:-EST= ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 

1993-1995 ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE WASHINGTON STATE DATA. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



63 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (IN LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE 
RECREATIONAL ANGLERS BY SPECIES, 1993-1996 FOR THE PACIFIC COAST. 



YEAR 


BARRED SANDBASS 


BARRED SURFPERCH 


BLACK ROCKFISH 


BLUE ROCKFISH 


BOCACCIO 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 




TuniicAMnc nc DniiMne 1 


1993. . 


1,048 


6 


315 


13 


1,621 


7 


1,310 


7 


271 


14 


1994. . 


1,034 


7 


167 


14 


1,150 


8 


503 


8 


424 


17 


1995. . 


1,468 


8 


354 


12 


1, 121 


7 


395 


8 


68 


21 


1996. . 


1,198 


6 


306 


13 


1,405 


8 


503 


8 


163 


19 


YEAR 


BROWN ROCKFISH 


CABEZON 


CALIFORNIA HALIBUT 


CANARY ROCKFISH 


CHILIPEPPER ROCKF. 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 






- - T 


iQUSANDS OF POUN[ 


■^e 
















1993. . 


148 


11 


262 


8 


596 


11 


251 


7 


36 


41 


1994. . 


59 


14 


171 


9 


790 


9 


184 


8 


50 


20 


1995. . 


97 


12 


186 


13 


2,349 


8 


266 


9 


23 


26 


1996. . 


109 


11 


280 


10 


1,619 


9 


136 


9 


31 


28 


YEAR 


COPPER ROCKFISH 


CORBINA 


GOPHER ROCKFISH 


GRASS ROCKFISH 


KELP BASS 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 




Tuni icAKinc r\c oni iKinc _ 1 


1993. . 


218 


10 


12 


21 


224 


11 


38 


17 


1,434 


6 


1994. . 


203 


12 


14 


26 


174 


11 


22 


16 


1,395 


6 


1995. . 


116 


12 


37 


21 


82 


13 


15 


17 


1,131 


7 


1996. . 


347 


8 


29 


22 


88 


11 


25 


18 


770 


6 


YEAR 


KELP GREENLING 


LINGCOD 


PACIFIC BARRACUDA 


PACIFIC BONITO 


PACIFIC COD 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 




TU/-M lOAKinO r\c D/-M IMOe 1 


1993. . 


195 


8 


1,605 


6 


1,688 


9 


707 


9 








1994. . 


95 


9 


906 


8 


2,016 


8 


519 


10 


1 


72 


1995. . 


85 


10 


856 


9 


2,491 


8 


177 


16 








1996. . 


221 


8 


1,172 


7 


996 


9 


87 


18 


14 


44 


YEAR 


PAC. CHUB MACKEREL 


PACIFIC SARDINE 


PILE PERCH 


QUILLBACK ROCKFISH 


REDTAIL SURFPERCH 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 






T 


HOUSANDS OF POUN 


DQ 










ya. 






1993. . 


1,373 


6 


51 


20 


37 


23 


94 


41 


58 


19 


1994. . 


2,225 


8 


42 


34 


26 


14 


16 


15 


70 


18 


1995. . 


2,163 


8 


4 


69 


20 


23 


8 


20 


62 


15 


1996. . 


1,520 


6 


19 


29 


171 


23 


88 


15 


101 


23 


YEAR 


SHEEPHEAD (CAL) 


SILVER SURFPERCH 


STRIPED BASS 


STRIPED SEAPERCH 


SURF SMELT 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 






T 


HOUSANDS OF POUN 


nQ 
















1993. . 


154 


21 


23 


17 


106 


18 


130 


10 


159 


27 


1994. . 


234 


17 


10 


21 


104 


19 


61 


16 


90 


28 


1995. . 


106 


19 


18 


19 


380 


15 


99 


21 


122 


24 


1996. . 


170 


16 


18 


23 


351 


12 


282 


14 


538 


27 


YEAR 


WHITE CROAKER 


WHITE STURGEON 


YELLOWTAIL 


YELLOWTAIL ROCKF. 


ALL FISH 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 


EST 1 PSE (%) 






1993. . 


425 


7 


207 


24 


943 


11 


Kii 

249 


8 


20,935 


2 


1994. . 


174 


15 


44 


36 


209 


18 


179 


8 


17,924 


2 


1995. . 


410 


21 


764 


21 


308 


17 


198 


9 


24,313 


2 


1996. . 


659 


9 


543 


16 


497 


12 


106 


14 


22,963 


2 



-EST= ESTIMATE. PSE (%) = PROPORTIONAL STANDARD ERROR. 
1993-1995 ESTIMATES DO NOT INCLUDE WASHINGTON STATE DATA. 



64 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



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U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



65 



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WORLD FISHERIES 



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WORLD FISHERIES 



83 



U.S. AND WORLD COMMERCIAL FISH CATCHES, 1958-95 



Year 


U.S. commercial catch 
and exvessel value 






World 


commercial 


catch 




Published 
by U.S. 
(excludes 
weight of 
mollusk 
shells) 


Published 

by FAO 

(1) 


Exvessel 
value 




Fresh- 
water 


Marine 


Grand 
total 


Peruvian 
anchovy 


Other (2) 


Total 




-Million me 
Liv« 


>tric tons- 
; weiqht 


Ri 1 1 Ion 

filo liars 






- — — Mt 1 1 


Lon metric tons- - - - 
jive weiqht 







I 


1958. . 


2.2 


2.7 


0.4 




4.5 


0.8 


28.0 


28.8 


33.3 


1959. . 


2.3 


2.9 


0.4 




5.1 


2.0 


29.8 


31.8 


35.9 


1960. . 


2.2 


2.8 


0.4 




5.6 


3.5 


31.1 


34.6 


40.2 


1961. . 


2.4 


2.9 


0.4 




5.7 


5.3 


32.6 


37.9 


43.6 


1962.. 


2.4 


3.0 


0.4 




5.8 


7.1 


31.9 


39.0 


44.8 


1963. . 


2.2 


2.8 


0.4 




5.9 


7.2 


33.5 


40.7 


46.6 


1954. . 


2.1 


2.6 


0.4 




6.2 


9.8 


35.9 


45.7 


51.9 


1965. . 


2.2 


2.7 


0.4 




7.0 


7.7 


38.5 


45.2 


53.2 


1966. . 


1.9 


2.5 


0.5 




7.3 


9.6 


40.4 


50.0 


57.3 


1967. . 


1.8 


2.4 


0.4 




7.2 


10.5 


42.7 


53.2 


60.4 


1968. . 


1.9 


2.5 


0.5 




7.4 


11.3 


45.2 


56.5 


63.9 


1969.. 


1.9 


2.5 


0.5 




7.6 


9.7 


47.1 


56.8 


54.4 


1970. . 


2.2 


2.8 


0.6 




8.4 


13.1 


44.1 


57.2 


55.5 


1971. . 


2.3 


2.9 


0.7 




9.0 


11.2 


45.9 


57.1 


55.1 


1972.. 


2.2 


2.8 


0.7 




5.7 


4.8 


51.5 


56.3 


62.0 


1973. . 


2.2 


2.8 


0.9 




5.8 


1.7 


55.2 


56.9 


62.7 


1974. . 


2.3 


2.8 


0.9 




5.8 


4.0 


56.0 


50.0 


55.8 


1975.. 


2.2 


2.8 


1.0 




6.0 


3.3 


56.4 


59.7 


55.7 


1976.. 


2.4 


3.0 


1.3 




5.7 


4.3 


59.1 


63.4 


69.1 


1977. . 


2.4 


3.0 


1.5 




5.8 


0.8 


61.6 


62.4 


68.2 


1978. . 


2.7 


3.4 


1.9 




5.7 


1.4 


63.1 


64.5 


70.2 


1979. . 


2.8 


3.5 


2.2 




5.9 


1.4 


53.6 


65.0 


70.9 


1980.. 


2.9 


3.6 


2.2 




6.2 


0.8 


55.1 


55.9 


72.1 


1981.. 


2.7 


3.8 


2.4 




5.6 


1.6 


66.4 


58.0 


74.6 


1982. . 


2.9 


4.0 


2.4 




5.8 


1.8 


68.2 


70.0 


75.8 


1983. . 


2.9 


4.3 


2.4 




7.5 


0.1 


69.9 


70.0 


77.5 


1984.. 


2.9 


5.0 


2.3 




8.0 


0.1 


75.8 


75.9 


83.9 


1985. . 


2.8 


4.9 


2.3 




8.7 


1.0 


76.7 


77.7 


86.4 


1986. . 


2.7 


5.2 


2.8 




9.7 


4.9 


78.2 


83.1 


92.8 


1987.. 


3.1 


6.0 


3.1 




10.4 


2.1 


81.9 


84.0 


94.4 


1988.. 


3.3 


5.9 


3.5 




11.1 


3.6 


84.4 


88.0 


99.1 


1989. . 


3.8 


5.8 


3.2 




11.4 


5.4 


83.3 


88.7 


100.1 


1990. . 


4.3 


5.9 


3.5 




11.4 


3.8 


82.8 


85.6 


98.0 


1991. . 


4.3 


5.5 


3.3 




12.4 


4.0 


81.4 


85.4 


97.8 


1992. . 


4.4 


5.6 


3.7 




13.2 


6.2 


80.7 


85.9 


100.1 


1993.. 


4.7 


5.9 


3.5 




14.7 


8.5 


80.0 


88.5 


103.2 


1994.. 


4.7 


5.9 


3.8 




16.4 


12.5 


81.6 


94.1 


110.5 


1995. . 


4.5 


5.6 


3.8 




18.1 


8.6 


86.2 


94.8 


112.9 



(1) Includes U.S. -flag vessel landings at foreign ports, transfer of catches onto foreign 
vessels within the U.S. EEZ (joint ventures), and the weight of mollusk shells. (2) Includes 
diadromous fishes including salmon and other anadromous fishes and catadromous fishes such 
as eels . 

Note: — There are 2,204.6 pounds in a metric ton. Prior to 1970, the world commercial catch 
of whales and seals is excluded. For the years 1970-1995, data for marine mammals and 
aquatic plants are excluded. 



Source: — Fishery Statistics of the United States; Fisheries of the United States; Food and 
Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) - Yearbook of Fishery Statistics, Rome; 
various issues. 



84 



WORLD FISHERIES 



WORLD COMMERCIAL CATCH OF FISH, CRUSTACEANS, AND MOLLUSKS, BY COUNTRIES, 
1991-95 (DOES NOT INCLUDE MARINE MAMMALS AND AQUATIC PLANTS) 



Country 


1991(1) 1 


1992(1) 1 1993(1) 1 


1994(1) 1 


1995 




13, 125 

6,888 

6,006 

9,301 

5,487 

4,045 

7,047 

3,352 

2,972 

2,173 

2,513 

2,316 

1,793 

1,745 

1,050 

1,453 

1,273 

1,307 

978 

1,020 

893 

641 

851 

1,565 

593 

769 

800 

819 

365 

417 

552 

374 

501 

515 

459 

344 

457 

865 

265 

245 

9,663 


, , . ■ . 






15,007 

7,503 

6,502 

8,502 

5,600 

4,233 

5,611 

3,439 

3,246 

2,561 

2,696 

2,272 

1,996 

1,780 

1,577 

1,247 

1,260 

1,314 

1,105 

1,080 

967 

705 

870 

1,372 

548 

800 

790 

821 

454 

503 

558 

347 

696 

553 

487 

333 

506 

526 

276 

315 

9,219 


Live-weight 

17,568 

9,010 

6,035 

8,081 

5,934 

4,546 

4,461 

3,685 

3,395 

2,562 

2,649 

2,264 

1,656 

1,782 

1,718 

1,201 

1,255 

1,416 

1,155 

1,100 

1,047 

932 

929 

1,212 

623 

837 

780 

860 

559 

470 

565 

331 

563 

622 

533 

397 

423 

371 

308 

348 

8,989 


20,719 

11,997 

7,838 

7,396 

5,922 

4,738 

3,781 

3,917 

3,537 

2,551 

2,700 

2,276 

1,916 

1,802 

1,560 

1,264 

1,372 

1,249 

1,182 

1,150 

1,091 

949 

964 

1,089 

752 

824 

820 

853 

603 

492 

576 

340 

521 

552 

530 

441 

460 

311 

319 

394 

8,790 


24,433 

8,943 

7,591 

6,758 

5,634 

4,904 

4,374 

4,118 

3,502 

2,808 

2,688 

2,269 

2,041 

1,850 

1,616 

1,358 

1,320 

1,288 

1,240 

1,200 

1,170 

1,149 

1,004 

901 

846 

832 

800 

793 

652 

612 

610 

592 

575 

541 

521 

505 

451 

425 

413 

412 

9, 171 




Chile 




United States (2) . . . 
















North Korea (3) 










Viet Nam (3) 




United Kingdom 






Brazil (3) 








Italy 




South Africa 






Poland 








All others 


Total 


97, 797 


100,177 


103,172 


110, 538 


112, 910 



(1) Revised. 

(2) Includes the weight of clam, oyster, scallop, and other molluslc shells. This weight 

is not included in U.S. landings statistics shown elsewhere. 

(3) Data estimated by FAO. 

Note: — Statistics on quantities caught by recreational fishermen in the United States are 
excluded 



Source: — Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) 



WORLD FISHERIES 



85 



WORLD COMMERCIAL CATCH OF FISH, CRUSTACEANS, AND MOLLUSKS, BY CONTINENT, 
1991-95 (DOES NOT INCLUDE MARINE MAMMALS AND AQUATIC PLANTS) 



Continent 



1991(1) 



1992 (1) 



1993 (1) 



1994 (1) 



North America. 
South America. 

Europe 

Former USSR. . . 

Asia 

Africa 

Oceania 

Other 

Total 



-Thousand metric tons - 
T.i ve-weight 



9,122 

15,386 

11,455 

9,447 

46,587 

4,851 

832 

117 



97,797 



8,780 

16,556 

12,743 

6,862 

48,896 

5,292 

916 

132 



100,177 



8,887 

17,837 

12,607 

5,448 

52,168 

5,191 

887 

147 



103,172 



8,834 

22,727 

12,896 

4,579 

55,243 

5,214 

893 

152 



110, 538 



8,490 
19,990 
13,463 

5,313 
59,042 

5,475 

1,009 
128 



112, 910 



(1) Revised. 

Source: — Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAG) 



WORLD COMMERCIAL CATCH OF FISH, CRUSTACEANS, AND MOLLUSKS, BY MAJOR FISHING 
AREAS, 1991-95 (DOES NOT INCLUDE MARINE MAMMALS AND AQUATIC PLANTS) 



Area 


1991 (1) 


1992 (1) 


1993(1) 


1994(1) 


1995 






ppV -11 c -, ^^ rrt(^+-VT,-^ ■(- /■ 












Live-weight 




Marine Areas: 












Pacific Ocean. . . . 


52,358 


52,844 


54,334 


59,975 


59,185 


Atlantic Ocean. . . 


23,792 


24,372 


23,748 


23,720 


24,690 


Indian Ocean 

Total 

Inland waters: 


6,879 


7,356 


7,857 


7,818 


8,031 


83, 029 


84,572 


85,939 


91,513 


91,906 












North America. . . . 


551 


583 


578 


573 


549 


South America. . . . 


331 


352 


376 


391 


415 


Europe 


493 


504 


497 


510 


528 


Former USSR 


764 


682 


568 


490 


489 


Asia 


10,798 


11,627 


13,336 


15,188 


17,091 




1,808 
23 


1,832 
25 


1,855 
23 


1,849 
24 


1,908 
24 


Oceania 


Total 

Grand total . . . 


14. 768 


15. 605 


17.233 


19. 025 


21. 004 


97, 797 


100,177 


103,172 


110,538 


112,910 



Source: — Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) 



86 



WORLD FISHERIES 



WORLD COMMERCIAL CATCH OF FISH, CRUSTACEANS, AND MOLLUSKS, BY SPECIES 
GROUPS, 1991-95, (DOES NOT INCLUDE MARINE MAMMALS AND AQUATIC PLANTS) 



Species group 



1991 (1) 



1992 (1) 



1993 (1) 



(1) 



Carps, barbels, cyprinids 

Cods, hakes, haddocks 

Flatfish 

Herrings, sardines, anchovies... 

Jacks, mullets, sauries 

Mackerel, snoeks, cutlassf ishes . 

Redf ish, basses, congers 

River eels 

Salmons, trouts, smelts 

Shads 

Sharks, rays, chimaeras 

Sturgeons, paddlefish 

Tilapias 

Tunas, bonitos, billf ishes 

Other fishes 

Crabs 

Krill 

Lobsters 

Shrimp 

Other crustaceans , 

Abalones, winkles, conchs , 

Clams, cockles, arkshells , 

Mussels 

Oysters 

Scallops 

Squids, cuttlefishes, octopus.. 

Other mollusks 

Sea urchins, other echinoderms. 

Miscellaneous 

Total 



6, 

10, 

1, 

21, 

10, 

3, 

6, 



483 
297 
103 
725 
387 
467 
021 
202 
710 
681 
706 
15 
002 
632 
513 
020 
356 
225 

,836 

848 

80 

,545 

,316 
990 
847 

,572 
834 
100 
284 



-Thousand metric tons- 
Metric tons 



7,227 

10,456 

1,179 

21,196 

10,539 

3,448 

6,058 

208 

1,478 

705 

725 

14 

1,063 

4,518 

16,250 

1,062 

305 

213 

2,951 

909 

85 

1,803 

1,338 

1,083 

1,056 

2,742 

944 

102 

520 



100,177 



8,177 

9, 931 

1, 116 

21,925 

10,147 

4,010 

5,822 

203 

1,712 

679 

737 

9 

1,087 

4,585 

17,320 

1,066 

89 

212 

2,920 

1, 165 

94 

1,967 

1,312 

1,171 

1,459 

2,722 

1,110 

105 

320 



103,172 



9,533 
9, 665 
1,000 
25,856 
10,089 
4,522 
6,456 

205 
1,814 

645 

750 

8 

1, 134 

4,680 

17,511 

1,258 

82 

222 
3, 118 
1,301 

100 
2,021 
1,262 
1,221 
1,634 
2,776 
1,170 

117 

388 



110,538 



(1) Revised. 

Source: — Food and Agriculture Organization 



of the United Nations (FAO) 



DISPOSITION OF WORLD COMMERCIAL CATCH, 1991-95 
(DOES NOT INCLUDE MARINE MAMMALS AND AQUATIC PLANTS) 



(1) 



Revised. 



Item 


1991 (1) 


1992(1) 1993(1) 


1994 (1) 


1995 1 


Marketed fresh 


D„^„„„^ „f ^„H-,l J 


22.4 
23.9 

13.1 
11.1 
27.9 

1.6 


26.2 
23.7 
12.2 

9.8 
26.3 

1.8 


26.2 
23.5 
12.3 

9.6 
26.6 

1.8 


27.2 
22.0 

11.4 
9.2 

28.6 
1.6 


31.6 
21.4 
11.0 

9.0 
25.3 

1.7 


Canned 

Cured 


Reduced to meal and oil (2) 

Miscellaneous purposes 


Total 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



(2) Only whole fish destined for the manufacture of oils and meals are included. Raw material 
for reduction derived from fish primarily destined for marketing fresh, frozen, canned, cured, 
and'miscellaneous purposes is excluded; such waste quantities are included under the other 
disposition 'channels . 



Source: — Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) 



WORLD FISHERIES 



87 



WORLD IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF SEVEN FISHERY COMMODITY GROUPS, 
BY LEADING COUNTRIES, 1991-95 



Country 



1991 (1) 



1992 (1) 



1993 (1) 



1994 (1) 



Japan 

United States . . . 

France 

Spain 

Germany 

Italy 

United Kingdom. . 

Hong Kong 

Denmark 

Netherlands 

Belgium 

Canada 

China 

Thailand 

South Korea 

Portugal 

Singapore 

Taiwan 

Sweden 

Other Countries. 
Total 

EXPORTS 

Thailand 

United States . . . 

Norway 

China 

Denmark 

Taiwan 

Canada 

Chile 

Indonesia 

Russia 

South Korea 

Netherlands 

Iceland 

India 

United Kingdom. . 

Spain 

France 

Argentina 

Germany 

Other Countries . 
Total 



-Thousand U.S. dollars- 



12,085, 

5,999, 

2,925, 

2,748, 

2, 114, 

2,689, 

1,911, 

1,232, 

1, 148, 

867, 

775, 

675, 

438, 

1,052, 

568, 

757, 

460, 

458, 

441, 

4, 137, 



125 
580 
994 
304 
720 
639 
905 
076 
255 
511 
966 
242 
090 
918 
229 
843 
545 
830 
490 
182 



43r 4B9r 444 



2,901,360 
3,281,746 
2,282,247 
1, 181,989 
2,302,299 
1,524,735 
2,168,122 
1,066,781 
1,186,062 

1,490,659 

1,356,885 

1,280,006 

647,652 

1,121,885 

772,651 

925,560 

448,012 

715,975 

12,262,841 



12,831, 

6,024, 

2,934, 

2,898, 

2,190, 

2,643, 

1,906, 

1,398, 

1,197, 

888, 

828, 

686, 

680, 

942, 

498, 

734, 

543, 

491, 

467, 

4,467, 



760 
064 
588 
232 
892 
440 
861 
181 
370 
606 
086 
876 
844 
090 
036 
928 
769 
029 
773 
246 



45, 254, 671 



38,917,467 



3,071, 

3,582, 

2,436, 

1,559, 

2,319, 

1,802, 

2,085, 

1,252, 

1,178, 

826, 

1,359, 

1,405, 

1,252, 

673, 

1,146, 

712, 

955, 

559, 

692, 

11,341, 



780 
545 
832 
977 
917 
097 
495 
364 
552 
299 
050 
567 
713 
369 
138 
729 
379 
029 
954 
410 



14,187, 

6,290, 

2,556, 

2,629, 

1,884, 

2,131, 

1,628, 

1,376, 

1,094, 

791, 

730, 

821, 

575, 

830, 

537, 

627, 

566, 

544, 

371, 

4,394, 



149 
233 
151 
799 
301 
181 
852 
856 
253 
608 
459 
404 
929 
480 
346 
713 
502 
243 
756 
097 



44, 570, 312 



40,214,196 



3,404, 

3,179, 

2,302, 

1,542, 

2,150, 

2,369, 

2,055, 

1,124, 

1,419, 

1,471, 

1,335, 

1,296, 

1,137, 

835, 

1,036, 

813, 

857, 

709, 

652, 

11,712, 



268 
474 
346 
429 
665 
422 
438 
679 
4 92 
446 
238 
340 
638 
980 
674 
750 
752 
292 
956 
740 



16,140, 

7,043, 

2,796, 

2,638, 

2,316, 

2,257, 

1,880, 

1,642, 

1,415, 

1,017, 

920, 

913, 

855, 

815, 

718, 

669, 

619, 

560, 

448, 

5,391, 



465 
431 
719 
737 
449 
462 
350 
105 
239 
635 
918 
404 
706 
616 
451 
888 
595 
799 
661 



51,063,519 



41,408,019 



4,190, 
3,229, 
2,718, 
2,320, 
2,359, 
2,213, 
2,182, 
1,303, 
1,583, 
1,720, 
1,411, 
1,435, 
1,264, 
1,125, 
1,180, 
1,021, 
909, 
728, 
790, 
13,576, 



036 
585 
132 
125 
034 
259 
078 
974 
416 
459 
052 
824 
615 
440 
158 
015 
734 
091 
357 
105 



47,262,489 



17,853, 

7,141, 

3,221, 

3,105, 

2,478, 

2,281, 

1,910, 

1,827, 

1,573, 

1,191, 

1,035, 

1,034, 

941, 

825, 

824, 

763, 

659, 

589, 

546, 

6,034, 



481 
428 
298 
684 
817 
316 
091 
691 
732 
857 
818 
070 
293 
606 
817 
245 
681 
723 
076 
407 



55,840,131 



4,449,457 
3,383,589 
3,122,662 
2,854,373 
2,459,629 
2,328,105 
2,314,413 
1,704,260 
1,666,752 
1,628,204 
1,564,878 
1,447,239 
1,342,552 
1,240,603 
1,195,477 
1,190,676 
993,364 
917,580 
899,248 
15,041,899 



51,744,960 



(1) 



Revised. 



Note: — Data on Imports and exports cover the international trade ot 1/6 countries or areas. The 
total value ot exports Is consistently less than the total value ol imports, probably because 
charges tor insurance, freight, and similar expenses were included in the import value but not 
in the export value. The seven fishery commodity groups covered by this table are: 1. Fish, 
tresh, chilled or frozen; 2. Fish, dried, salted, or smoked; 3. Crustaceans and mollusks, 
fresh, dried, salted,, etc.; 4. Fish products and preparations, whether or not in airtight 
containers; 5. Crustacean and mollusk products and preparations, whether or not in airtight 
containers; 6. Oils and tats, crude or refined, ot aquatic animal origin; and /. Meals, 
solubles and similar animal foodstuffs of aquatic animal origin. 

Source: — Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) 



PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 



(0 

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PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 



89 



VALUE OF PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1995 AND 1996 
(Processed from domestic catch and imported products) 



(1) Preliminary. May not add due to rounding. 
Note: — Value is based on selling price at the plant. 




FISH STICKS, FISH PORTIONS, AND BREADED SHRIMP 



Item 


1995 


1996 


(1) 




dollars 


Percent 

of tot^il 


Thousand 
dol lars 


Percent, 

of total 


Edible: 










Fresh and frozen 


5,301,256 


70.4 


5,078,177 


68.6 


Canned 


1,544,208 


20.5 


1,428,900 


19.3 


Cured 


99,117 


1.3 


112,778 


1.5 


Total AcUMa 

Industrial : 


€.944,581 


92.2 


6, 619. 855 


89.4 










Bait and animal food 










(canned) 


342,842 


4.6 


505,060 


6.8 


Meal, oil, and 












172,279 
74,264 


2.3 

1.0 


192, 176 
85,583 


2.6 

1.2 


Other 


Total laduatrlal 

Grand total 


589. 385 


7.8 


782. 819 


10.6 


7, 533, 9€6 


100.0 


7. 402, «74 


100.0 



U.S. PRODUCTION OF FISH STICKS, FISH PORTIONS, AND BREADED SHRIIWP, 1987-96 



1987. 
1988. 
1989. 
1990. 
1991. 
1992. 
1993. 
1994. 
1995. 
1996. 



Fish sticks 



Thons;:ind 



98, 927 
80,148 
89,112 
65,209 
63,286 
58,295 
67,959 
58,789 
74,066 
65,244 



Thousand 
do] lars 

142,946 
113,868 
116,440 
74,866 
77,877 
56,020 
67,975 
51,429 
73,478 
55,802 



Fish portions 



Thousand 



323,968 
301,450 
279,864 
242,776 
204,697 
194,307 
206,165 
196,289 
251,217 
213,962 



Thousand 
dol lars 

446,459 
439,701 
400,351 
352,589 
313,400 
296,214 
313,195 
268,353 
356,518 
306,501 



Breaded shrimp 



Thousand 



108,937 
99,471 
120,927 
110,760 
116,335 
122,266 
111,489 
113,461 
100,522 
108,486 



Thousand 
dol lars 

371,798 
292,899 
404,535 
353,265 
335,880 
350,497 
316,722 
304,931 
299,355 
341,770 



90 



PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 



FISH FILLETS AND STEAKS 



PRODUCTION OF FRESH AND FROZEN FILLETS AND STEAKS, BY SPECIES, 1995 AND 1996 



Species 



1995 (1) 



Thousand 



Fillets: 

Amber jack 

Anglerf ish 

Bluef ish 

Cod 

Cusk 

Dolphin 

Drum 

Flounders 

Groupers 

Haddock 

Hake 

Halibut 

Lingcod 

Marlin 

Ocean perch: 

Atlantic 

Pacific 

Ocean pout 

Pollock: 

Atlantic 

Alaska 

Rockf ishes 

Sablefish 

Salmon 

Sea bass 

Sea trout 

Shark 

Snapper 

Spanish mackerel. 

Swordf ish 

Tilapia 

Tuna 

Wahoo , 

Whitef ish , 

Wolffish , 

Unclassified. . . . , 

Total 

Steaks: 

Dolphin 

Halibut 

King mackerel . . . 

Salmon 

Shark 

Swordf ish 

Tuna 

Unclassified. . . . 

Total 

Grand total .... 
(1) Revised. 



296 

5,552 

120 

65,435 

339 

2,555 

67 

35,066 

2,316 

2,672 

6,422 

4,168 

1, 147 

470 

230 

2,214 

22 

3,930 

135,457 

25, 150 

1,607 

15,641 

773 

464 

11,142 

1,952 

312 

6,438 

637 

6,127 

203 

1,379 

397 

14.267 



354. 967 



169 

6,984 

7 

1, 606 

53 

3,592 

4,007 

13.908 



30. 32S 



385, 293 



Thoiis.=ind 



1, 169 

11,978 

247 

152,033 

1,098 

9,775 

210 

86,298 

13,004 

11,164 

7,486 

20,039 

1,656 

1,531 

679 

2,629 

42 

9,962 

183,536 

38,391 

4,071 
57,918 

4,374 

1,550 

14,680 

11,231 

499 

36,460 

1,952 
36,344 

1,239 

2,891 

904 

40.449 



Thousand 
pounds 



767. 489 



469 

26,368 
25 

4,730 

121 

16,902 

13,777 

11.038 



73. 430 



313 

6,993 

108 

66,971 

222 

2,847 

76 

29, 162 

2,298 

3,977 

8,431 

3,745 

972 

564 

258 
1,737 



1,970 

136,379 

20,214 

1,599 

18,673 

716 

276 

2,394 

1,891 

121 

6,089 

353 

9,328 

244 

1,335 

66 

16.712 



347. 042 



274 

6,282 

6 

3,380 

12 

2, 933 

4,706 

33.330 



50. 923 



840,919 



397, 965 



Thousand 
dol lars 



Note: Some fillet production was further processed into frozen blocks. 



PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 
CANNED FISHERY PRODUCTS 
PRODUCTION OF CANNED FISHERY PRODUCTS, BY SPECIES, 1995 AND 1996 



91 









1995 (1) 






1996 




Species 


Pounds 
per 














Standard 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Standard 


Thousand 


Thousand 




case 


cases 


pound 


dollars 


cases 


pound 


dollars 


For human consumption: 
















Fish: 
















Herring 


23.4 


292,193 


6,837 


12,032 


266,308 


6,232 


10,826 


Salmon : 
















Chinook 


44.25 


3,825 


169 


474 


2,589 


115 


628 


Chum 


44.25 


234,938 


10,396 


16,173 


337,634 


14,940 


19,572 


Pink 


44.25 


4,049,808 


179,204 


258,900 


2,947,797 


130,440 


158,969 


Coho 


44.25 


66,339 


2,935 


6,318 


61,867 


2,738 


5,594 


Sockeye 

Total salmon. . . 

Specialties 


44.25 
48 


1,149,476 


50,864 


137,371 


1,105,756 


48,930 


99,582 


5, 504, 386 


243,568 


419,236 


4, 455, 643 


197, 163 


284, 345 


9,761 


469 


4,197 


10,520 


505 


4,272 


Sardines, Maine.... 


23.4 


579,797 


13,567 


23,669 


755,232 


17,672 


29,857 


Tuna: (2) 
















Albacore : 
















Solid 


18 


7,718,778 


138,938 


326,701 


7,798,889 


140,380 


310,999 


Chunk 

Total 

Lightmeat : 


18 


1,411,782 


25,412 


54,236 


1,403,026 


25,254 


51,691 


9. 130, seo 


164. 350 


380. 937 


9.201.915 


165. 634 


362.690 














Solid 


18 


228,547 


4, 114 


5,765 


331,726 


5,971 


8,938 


Chunk 

Total 

Total tuna. . . 

Specialties 


18 
48 


27,676,500 


498, 117 


551,839 


28,011,722 


504,211 


585,296 


27. 90S. 047 


502, 231 


557. 604 


28. 343. 448 


510.182 


594,234 


37. 035. 607 


666.581 


938,541 


37,545,363 


675.816 


956.924 


226 


11 


44 


155 


7 


80 


Other 

Total fish 

Shellfish: 


48 


327,419 


15,716 


21,502 


324,317 


15,567 


12,185 


43.7*9,999 


946 749 


1.419.221 


43. 357. 538 


912. 962 


1,298.489 














Clam and clam 
















products: (3) 
















Whole and minced. 


15 


2,865,294 


42,979 


61,677 


3,057, 118 


45,856 


61,987 


Chowder and juice 


30 


2,491,088 


74,733 


38,198 


2,385,018 


71,551 


46,164 


Specialties 


48 


239,633 


11,502 


9,908 


249,037 


11,954 


9,100 


Crabs, natural 


19.5 


3,309 


65 


356 


4,778 


93 


380 


Lobster meat and 
















specialties 


48 


8,627 


414 


479 


7,104 


341 


384 


Oyster, specialties 


48 


124 


6 


76 


175 


8 


131 


Shrimp, Natural (4) 


6.75 


135,175 


912 


6,662 


121,321 


819 


6,074 


Other 


48 


156,374 


7,506 


7,631 


195.574 


9,388 


6,191 


Total shall fish. 
Total for human 


5.899.624 


138.117 


124.987 


6. 020. 125 


140.010 


130. 4441; 














constaaptlon . . . . 
For bait and animal food 
Grand total 


48 


49. 649, 013 


1.084.866 


1.544.208 


49,377,663 


1.052,972 


1.429,900 


17.548.979 


842,351 


34Z,84Z 


25. 607. 813 


1.229.175 


505, OM 


67,197,992 


1,927,217 


1, 887, 050 


74, 985, 476 


2,282,147 


1, 933, 960 



(1) 

(2) 
(3) 

(4) 



Revised. 

Flakes included with chunk. 

"Cut out" or "drained" weight of can contents are given for whole or minced clams, and net 

contents for other clam products . 
Drained weight. 



92 



PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 



CANNED FISHERY PRODUCTS 



PRODUCTION OF CANNED FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1987-96 



Yeai 


For h 


jman 


For animal 


Total 1 




consum 


Dtion 


food and bait 








Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 




pounds 


dollars 


pounds 


dollars 


pounds 


do! lars 


1987. . 


965,012 


1,476,484 


220,641 


85,416 


1, 185,653 


1,561,900 


1988. . 


908,687 


1,388, 122 


222,920 


97,492 


1,131,607 


1,485,614 


1989. . 


1, 109,788 


1,753,536 


345,464 


238,343 


1,455,252 


1,991,879 


1990. . 


956,962 


1,414,846 


221,320 


146,947 


1,178,282 


1,561,793 


1991. . 


981,275 


1,439,362 


404,440 


204,917 


1,385,715 


1,644,279 


1992. . 


936,117 


1,330,173 


607,678 


247,261 


1,543,795 


1,577,434 


1993.. 


983,225 


1,375,377 


725,822 


312,597 


1,709,047 


1,687,974 


1994.. 


985,675 


1,470,234 


782,272 


325,264 


1,767,947 


1,795,498 


1995. . 


1,084,866 


1,544,208 


842,351 


342,842 


1,927,217 


1,887,050 


1996. . 


1,052,972 


1,428,900 


1,229,175 


505,060 


2,282,147 


1,933,960 



3 1500 



PRODUCTION OF CANNED FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1987-96 




91 92 93 

YEAR 



For Human ES3 For Animal 



PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS 



93 



PRODUCTION OF MEAL, OIL, AND SOLUBLES, 1995 AND 1996 




Product 


1995 (1) 


1996 1 


Dried scrap and meal: 
Fish: 


Thoiisand 
pounds 

450,528 

64,548 

135.748 


Thousand 

dol lars 

82,453 

8,140 

30.57 9 


Thousand 
pounds 

418,898 

52,258 

149.772 


Thousand 
dollars, 

87,064 

7,682 

46,223 


Tuna and mackerel.... 
Unclassified 

Total 

Shellfish 

Total, Bcrap and maal 

Solublaa, total 

Body oil: 

Menhaden 

Unclassified 

Total, oil 


650.324 


121.172 


€20. 928 


140. 969 


16.416 


1.038 


17,572 


1,194 


€67.240 


122.210 


€38.500 


142. 1€3 


89.513 


7,809 


81.994 


6.0€8 


238,164 
3.777 


41,929 

331 


246,536 
1.863 


43,713 
232 


241,941 


42, 2S0 


248, 399 


43, 945 


(1) Revised. 











Note: — To convert pounds of oil to gallons divide by 7.75. 
American Samoa and Puerto Rico. 



The above data includes production in 



PRODUCTION OF INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS, 1987-96 



Year 


Quantity 


Value 1 


Meal 


Solubles 


Marine 

animal 
oil 


Meal, 

solubles, 

and oil 


Other 

industrial 

products 


Grand 
total 


1987 

1988 

1989 

1990 

1991 

1992 

1993 

1994 

1995 

1996 








786,978 
643,796 
618,382 
577,498 
612,716 
644,512 
750,744 
807,833 
667,240 
638,500 


249,289 

223,449 

232,709 

185,660 

169,607 

93,007 

126,903 

146,568 

89,513 

81,994 


298,496 
224,733 
225,478 
281,949 
267,345 
184,725 
293,452 
291,882 
241,941 
248,399 


174,321 
188,843 
156,321 
163,796 
170,495 
157,693 
182,170 
186,222 
172,279 
192,176 


37,524 
46,737 
49,756 
42,759 
37,707 
45,310 
43,689 
61,992 
74,264 
85,583 


211,845 
235,580 
206,077 
206,555 
208,202 
203,003 
225,859 
248,214 
246,543 
277,759 



include the value of imported items that may be further processed. 



94 



U.S. COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS 

FROZEN FISHERY PRODUCTS 

U.S. COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1996 



Item 


January 


February 


March 


April 


May 


June 




31 


28 


31 


30 


31 


30 


Eiah 






- -Thousand pounds- 






Blocks: 














Cod 


5,753 


5, 967 


4,178 


4,845 


4,368 


4,533 




1,015 
2,196 


970 
1,268 


1,041 
741 


1,095 
1,288 


951 
1,884 


836 
2,556 


Haddock 


Ocean perch 


138 


144 


149 


176 


92 


100 


Pollock: Alaska 


10,972 


13,923 


17,119 


15,404 


14,549 


13,215 


Saithe and other.... 


5,673 


3,481 


4,791 


6,553 


10,253 


9,029 




737 
3,492 


1,073 
2,941 


1,218 
4,866 


763 
6,803 


471 
12,946 


987 
15,769 


Minced (grated) all species... 


Unclassified 

Total blocks 

Fillets and steaks: 


2,997 


2,372 


2,413 


3,301 


3,370 


1,565 


32. 973 


32. 139 


36.516 


40. 228 


48. 884 


48. 590 














Cod 


15,168 


16,095 


15,372 


16,727 


20,264 


21,997 


Flounder 


4,903 


4,402 


4,537 


4,572 


4,274 


4,463 


Haddock 


4,741 


3,999 


3,068 


3,872 


3,773 


3,894 


Halibut 


968 


882 


732 


613 


912 


606 


Ocean perch 


5,343 


5,440 


3,695 


4,349 


2,974 


3,454 




11,810 


12,006 


9,187 


10,052 


7,035 


8,323 


Whiting 


5,651 


2,364 


4,041 


3,640 


2,623 


2,552 


Total flllBta and staaJts. . . 

Fish sticks and portions 


29,881 


27,007 


22,954 


21,823 


27,624 


25,840 


78. 465 


72. 195 


63. 586 


65. 648 


69. 479 


71.129 














(cooked uncooked, all species). 
Round, dressed, etc.: 


25,642 


19,116 


23,058 


17,611 


16,995 


17,000 














Catfish 


10,525 


8,716 


9,301 


9,022 


9,608 


8,486 


Halibut 


4,482 


3,176 


2,319 


2, 176 


2,829 


3,354 




946 
57,092 


1,175 
44,429 


985 
33,642 


974 
23,481 


889 

13,714 


878 
11,971 




Whiting 


712 


592 


1,329 


4,195 


2,190 


4,399 


Unclassified 


32,989 


28,116 


22,515 


21,944 


26,019 


22,050 


Surimi and analog products.... 


24,394 


21,271 


28,352 


25,950 


24,819 


21,204 


Shallfiah 
















4,589 


4,897 


6, 169 


5,294 


4,475 


4,998 


Crabs : 


King 


4,109 


2,984 


2,665 


2,295 


2,530 


2,715 




7,523 
8,062 


5,762 
6,879 


12,229 
7,822 


12,919 
6,234 


10,356 
4,676 


9,575 
3,497 


Unclassified 


Lobsters (spiny and other) 


4,282 


5, 122 


3,730 


2,832 


2,515 


2,386 


Scallops 


2,282 


2,628 


2,520 


2,185 


1,754 


1,978 


















13287 
5,138 


11787 
5,637 


8873 
4,574 


9587 
5,618 


7541 
4,362 


6,864 
4,422 




Peeled 


14,855 


13,537 


8,702 


9,653 


8,644 


10,917 


Unclassified 

Total ahriap 

Squid 


10,272 


9,361 


8,401 


7,353 


6,913 


8,299 


43. 552 


40. 322 


30, 550 


32. 211 


27, 460 


30.502 


20,035 
4,145 


21,056 
3,383 


19,538 
3,273 


18,709 
3,530 


14,728 
4,341 


11,988 
4,069 


Other shellfish 


6,911 


7,380 


8,170 


7,627 


10,488 


12,488 


Cured £i*h 

Total flBh and ehallflah. . . 


574 


616 


424 


291 


302 


291 


374,284 


331, 954 


318, 693 


305, 356 


299, 051 


293, 548 



U.S. COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS 
FROZEN FISHERY PRODUCTS 



95 



U.S. COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1996 - Continued 



July 
31 



August 
31 



September October 
30 31 



November 
30 



December 
31 



Blocks : 

Cod 

Flounder 

Haddock 

Ocean perch 

Pollock: Alaska 

Saithe and other. . . . 

Whiting 

Minced (grated) all species... 
Unclassified 

Total bloaka 

Fillets and steaks: 

Cod 

Flounder 

Haddock 

Halibut 

Ocean perch 

Pollock 

Whiting 

Unclassified 

Total fjLllmtB and staakm. 

Fish sticks and portions 

(cooked uncooked, all species) . 
Round, dressed, etc.: 

Catfish 

Halibut 

Rainbow trout 

Salmon 

Whiting 

Unclassified 

Suriml and analog products.... 
Sh«llfl«h 

Clams and clam meats 

Crabs : 

King 

Snow 

Unclassified 

Lobsters (spiny and other) 

Scallops 

Shrimp: 

Raw, headless 

Breaded 

Peeled 

Unclassified 

Tot»l shrimp 

Squid 

Other shellfish 

Bait and animal food 

Cured fish 

Total fiah and shall fish. 

Note: — Holdings of frozen fishery 
Source: — Frozen Fishery Products 
will provide additional informati 



4,033 

939 

2,011 

133 

13, 681 

7,472 

478 

16,084 

2,015 



46.846 



24,080 

8,895 

3, 627 

560 

3,321 

12,916 
1,096 

21, 653 



7^a49 



17.862 



9,643 

4,073 

711 

39,128 

2,282 

33,847 

15,846 

5,813 

2,835 
8, 616 
4, 318 
2, 661 
2,448 



6,736 
5,993 
9,813 
6,859 



29. 401 



8,376 
7,233 



15,075 
666 



333, 828 



-Thousand pounds - 



4,046 
964 

1,695 

186 

12,963 

5, 041 
559 

8, 313 

1, 374 



35.141 



16, 965 
5,539 
4,004 
432 
2, 573 
7, 603 
2,861 

24,806 



64.783 



14,585 



9,871 

6,673 

539 

59, 535 

1, 590 
36,778 
15, 682 

8,062 

2, 693 
7, 396 
3,962 
3,080 
3,545 



6, 518 

9,306 

10,254 

6, 611 



32.689 



5,011 
4, 100 



15,013 
1143 



331, 671 



7,451 

983 

1,356 

182 

14,758 

3,285 

587 

16,230 

1,422 



46.254 



12,109 
5,176 
3,810 
515 
1,654 
8,380 
3,344 

22,754 



g7 , 7 ^^ 



20.833 



10,275 

8,019 

493 

61,002 
1,392 

37, 901 

16,340 

4,809 

3,329 
7,806 
3,433 
3,661 
2,509 



6,737 

5,122 

13,740 

9,341 



34. 940 



6,244 
4,378 



13,847 

1250 



34^,457 



3,810 

1,385 

1,167 

181 

18, 953 

8,307 

614 

12,888 

1,529 



4$. 934 



14,695 

5,373 

3,291 

604 

4,477 

13,413 
3,318 

23,420 



68.591 



18,807 



11,021 

8,366 

447 

51,497 
1,130 

40,125 

20,855 

7, 939 

4,016 
6, 318 
3,365 
3,636 
2,407 



7,021 

5, 602 

15,286 

11,088 



38. 997 



8,194 
4,782 



11,042 
1112 



361, 481 



3,936 

972 

978 

270 

23,499 

10,378 

935 

6, 397 

1, 933 



49,299 



13,211 

5,719 

3,371 

517 

4, 503 

11,781 
4,539 

23, 536 



^7,^77 



20,759 



11,762 

7,811 

488 

45,232 
1, 137 

41,232 

19, 915 

7,778 

3, 323 
5, 475 
2,988 
4,395 
2,416 



8,031 

6,039 

16,264 

12,271 



42. 605 



11, 693 
5,727 



11, 963 
1249 



364, 423 



452 
947 
905 
222 
590 
.162 
888 
,261 
,097 



60.524 



9, 
4, 
4, 

4, 
12, 

5, 
24, 



107 
778 
584 
663 
255 
725 
434 
312 



65. 959 



328 
300 
75 
051 
918 
608 
000 



981 
600 
982 
042 
238 



564 
662 
640 

Oil 



877 1 

902 

131 

450 
795 



369, 420 



products incl 
Annual Summa 
on. 



ude domestic and imported fish and shellfish. 
ry, 1996, Current Fishery Statistics No. 9601 



96 



FOREIGN TRADE 

IMPORTS 



2000 



U.S. IMPORTS OF EDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1996 
FROM MAJOR MARKETS 



1500 




Thailand 



Canada 



Mexico E.U. 

Soutli America 



Other Europe 
Other Asia Other 



U.S. IMPORTS OF EDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1996 
BY MAJOR GROUP 




Shrimp 



Salmon 



Tuna 



Other Fresh/Frozen 
Canned tuna Other 



FOREIGN TRADE 



97 



IMPORTS 



FISHERY PRODUCTS IMPORTS, BY PRINCIPAL ITEMS, 1995 AND 1996 



Item 



Edible fishery products: 
Fresh and frozen: 
Whole or eviscerated: 

Freshwater 

Flatfish 

Groundfish 

Salmon 

Tuna (1) 

Other 

Fillets and steaks: 

Freshwater 

Flatfish 

Groundfish 

Other 

Blocks and slabs 

Surimi 

Shrimp 

Crabmeat 

Lobster: 

American 

Spiny 

Scallops (meats) 

Other fish and shellfish. 

Total, frmab and frozan 

Canned: 

Anchovy 

Herring 

Mackerel 

Salmon 

Sardines 

Tuna 

Clams 

Crabmeat 

Lobsters 

Oysters 

Shrimp 

Balls, cakes, and puddings 
Other fish and shellfish.. 

Total, cannBd 

Cured: 

Dried 

Pickled or salted 

Smoked or kippered 

Total, cured 

Caviar and roe 

Prepared meals 

Other fish and shellfish... 
Total •dibi* fiabmry 

product* 

Nonedible fishery products: 

Meal and scrap 

Fish oils 

Other 

Total nonmdlbla fiabmry 

pzoduata 

Grand total 



Thousand 




26,080 

47,134 
184,845 
219,424 
210,275 

11,023 
590,634 

12,363 

37,095 

28,785 

48,331 

174,025 



2.597,495 



6, 371 

1, 656 
20,086 

1,202 

42,280 

215,365 

9, 938 
12,441 

1,096 
10, 602 

6,570 

7,881 
42,935 



376. 422 



22, 906 

38, 552 

9, 467 



70. 924 



4, 727 
2, 923 

11, 967 



3. 06€. 458 



139,101 
23,913 



tons 

26,459 
14,432 
24, 989 
57,209 
224, 928 
108, 973 

11,830 
21, 380 
83,845 
99, 530 
95, 380 

5,000 
267, 910 

5, 608 

16,826 
13, 057 
21, 923 
78,937 



1. 178.216 



2,890 

751 

9,111 

545 

19,178 

97,689 

4, 508 

5,643 

497 

4,809 

2,980 

3,575 

19,475 



1 71 . 651 



10, 390 

17,487 

4,294 



32.171 



2,144 
1,326 
5, 428 



1.390.936 



63,096 

10,847 



Thous,=ind 
dol Tars 

61,804 

58,081 

45,310 

280,781 

457,493 

272,829 

68, 536 

112, 922 

323,836 

446,318 

213,566 

8, 361 

2, 564,830 

64,294 

210,442 
281,227 
174, 103 
427, 668 



Thousand 




26, 133 

45,091 
178,209 
227,036 
234,210 

29, 312 
578, 908 

11,272 

37, 948 

25,082 

58, 686 

219,702 



6. 072. 401 



2. 726. 817 



21, 
2, 

9, 

5, 

48, 

233, 

11, 
49, 
10, 
30, 
16, 
14, 
49, 



403 
306 
664 
627 
923 
505 
570 
226 
347 
964 
061 
208 
590 



1 
20 

2 

40 

193 

11 

12 

10 
3 



050 
563 
274 
266 
926 
037 
054 
773 
798 
198 
563 
344 
602 



503.394 



354.449 



64,043 
46,794 
24, 948 



22,064 

36,971 

8,382 



135. 785 



67.417 



33,709 
8,384 

38,017 



5,088 

2,661 

13,355 



g. 791. 690 



3.169.787 



24, 658 

13,795 

5, 621, 480 



135,561 
35,622 



5. 659. 933 



(1) Includes loins and discs. 



12, 451, 623 



tons 

29,449 
14,230 
27,107 
64, 528 
239,818 
103,516 

11,854 

20,453 

80,835 

102, 983 

106,237 

13,296 

262,591 

5,113 

17,213 
11,377 
26,620 
99, 656 



1.236.876 



3,198 

709 

9,196 

1,028 

18,564 

87,561 

5,014 

5,794 

362 

4, 626 

1,616 

3,785 

19, 324 



160. 777 



10,008 

16,770 

3,802 



30.580 



2,308 
1,207 
6,058 



1.437.806 



61,490 
16, 158 



Thousand 
dol 1 a rs 

68,072 

56, 929 

47,080 

304, 612 

509,783 

274,515 

74, 688 

96,092 
310,417 
448,706 
213,323 

15, 956 
2,448,468 

50,043 

220, 988 
224,872 
197,855 
481,321 



6. 043. 720 



23,197 

2,458 
10,758 

6,219 

46,532 

215,892 

12,410 

48,719 

7,271 
28,753 

9,032 
13, 948 
48, 517 



473.706 



60,201 
47,057 
24,462 



131.720 



35,305 

8,252 

36,911 



6. 729. 614 



33,981 

18,967 

6,277,793 



6.330. 741 



13,060,355 



Note: — Data include imports into the United States and Puerto Rico and landings of tuna by 
foreign vessels at American Samoa. Statistics on imports are the weight of individual products 
as exported, i.e., fillets, steaks, whole, headed, etc. 

Imports and Exports of Fishery Products, Annual Summary, 1996, Current Fishery Statistics 
No. 9602 provides additional information. 

Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



98 



FOREIGN TRADE 



IMPORTS 
EDIBLE AND NONEDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS IMPORTS, 1987-96 



Edible 



Nonedible 



Total 



1987. 
1988. 
1989. 
1990. 
1991. 
1992. 
1993. 
1994. 
1995. 
1996. 



Thousand 

pounds 

3,201,099 
2,967,755 
3,243,022 
2,884,596 
3,014,819 
2,893,954 
2,917,160 
3,034,841 
3,066,458 
3. 169.787 



tons 

1,452,009 
1,346,165 
1,471,025 
1,308,444 
1,367,513 
1,312,689 
1,323,215 
1,376,595 
1,390,936 
1.437.806 



-Thousand dollars- - 



5,711,233 
5,441,628 
5,497,849 
5,233,167 
5,671,887 
5,705,876 
5,848,738 
6,645,132 
6,791,690 
6.729.614 



3,106,464 
3,430,369 
4,106,507 
3,814,513 
3,763,173 
4,165,386 
4,773,649 
5,341,740 
5,659,933 
6.330.741 



8,817,697 

8,871,997 

9,604,356 

9,047,680 

9,435,060 

9,871,262 

10,622,387 

11, 986,872 

12,451,623 

13.060.355 



Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



^^^^^^M^^- 




FISHERY PRODUCTS IMPORTS: VALUE, DUTIES COLLECTED, 
AND AD VALOREM EQUIVALENT, 1987-96 



Year 


Value 


Duties 
collected 


Average ad valorem 
equivalent 


Fishery 
imports 


All 
imports 


Fishery 
imports 


All 

imports 


Fishery 
imports 


All 
imports 


1987 


8,817,697 


- - - -Thousan 


, , . , 




- - - - Percent - - - 


3.5 




13,922,567 


402,066,002 


178,861 


2.0 




1988 


8,871,997 


437,140,185 


206,470 


15,054,304 


2.3 




3.4 


1989 


9,604,356 


472,976,600 


235,851 


16,096,400 


2.5 




3.4 


1990 


9,047,680 


490,553,800 


213,710 


16,338,700 


2.4 




3.3 


1991 


9,435,060 


483,027,900 


204,694 


16,197,300 


2.2 




3.4 


1992 


9,871,262 


525,091,414 


206,480 


17, 164,481 


2.1 




3.3 


1993 


10,622,387 


486,386,000 


215,885 


18,333,800 


2.0 




3.8 


1994 


11,986,872 


657,884,700 


242,977 


19,846,400 


2.0 




3.0 


1995 


12,451,623 


739,660,200 


221,270 


18,596,800 


1.8 




2.5 


1996 


13,060,355 


790,469,700 


219,114 


18,005,300 


1.7 




2.3 



Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



FOREIGN TRADE 



99 



IMPORTS 



EDIBLE AND NONEDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS IMPORTS, 1996 



Continent and Country 




Edible 


1 


Nonedible | 


Total 


North America: 


Thousand 
pounds, 

524,532 

143,830 

19,837 

27,926 

194 

122,128 


Metric, 
tons 

237,926 

65,241 

8,998 

12,667 

88 

55,397 


- - - - -Thousand dollars- - 

1,153,499 711,052 

449,720 176,673 

56,899 46,813 

103,216 26 

388 99,931 

347,972 32,316 


1,864,551 
626,393 
103,712 
103,242 
100,319 
380,288 








Dominican Republic... 
Other 


Total 


838. 447 


380. 317 


2.111.694 


1.066.811 


3.178.505 


South America: 


197,354 
146,546 
15,267 
69,489 
22,976 
74,344 


89,519 
66,473 
6,925 
31,520 
10,422 
33,722 


499,460 

283,312 

59,980 

75,017 

38,888 

156,018 


7,860 
21,955 
42,618 
14,354 
35,179 
63,611 


507,320 
305,267 
102,598 
89,371 
74,067 
219,629 


Chile 


Brazil 






Other 


Total 


525, 976 


238, 581 


1.112.675 


Ifl5.S77 


1.298.252 


Europe: 

Italy 


778 
31,923 
1,217 
11,876 
23,567 
31,751 


353 
14,480 

552 

5,387 

10,690 

14,402 


2,705 
19,420 

2,419 
23,226 
29,299 
56,500 


1,320,593 
499,218 
295,177 
125,504 
56,666 
189,880 


1,323,298 
518,638 
297,596 
148,730 
85,965 
246,380 






United Kingdom 


Other 


Total 


101,112 


45. 864 


133. 569 


2.487,038 


2, 620, 607 




89,844 

131,886 

58,404 

2 

454 

6,510 


40,753 

59,823 

26,492 

1 

206 

2,953 


180,379 

178,208 

108,771 

5 

1,268 

12,287 


5,073 
3,961 
20,218 
97,570 
61,032 
50,322 


185,452 

182,169 

128,989 

97,575 

62,300 

62,609 








Turkey 


Other 


Total 


287, 101 


130. 228 


480. 918 


238.176 


719.094 


Asia : 


344,101 
67,018 
65,840 

224,651 
8,459 

537,867 


156,083 
30,399 
29,865 

101,901 

3,837 

243,975 


1,113,387 
145,094 
144,938 
285,256 
12,044 
888,873 


385,352 
448,803 
298,699 
141,567 
409,389 
554,400 


1,498,739 
593,897 
443,637 
426,823 
421,433 

1,443,273 






China 




Other 


Total 


1.247,936 


566, 060 


2. 589. 592 


2.238.210 


4.827.802 




83,422 
4,266 
280 
5,104 
2,617 
9,270 


37,840 

1,935 

127 

2,315 

1, 187 
4,205 


165,437 

33,305 

369 

7,406 

2,838 

7,838 


6,013 
48,184 
15,277 

1,293 
4 

2,655 


171,450 

81,489 

15,646 

8,699 

2,842 

10,493 




French Polynesia 




Other 


Total 

Africa: 


104.959 


47.609 


217.193 


73.426 


290.619 


18,920 
6,541 
4,493 
8,990 

18,728 
6,585 


8,582 
2,967 
2,038 
4,078 
8,495 
2,987 


21, Hi 
17,193 
11,384 
10,222 
9,904 
8,096 


22,260 

6,197 

22 

322 

329 

12,373 


49,434 
23,390 
11,406 
10,544 
10,233 
20,469 










Other 


Total 


64.257 


29. 147 


83.973 


41.503 


125.476 


Grand total .... 


3,169,787 


1, 437, 806 


6, 729, 614 


6, 330, 741 


13,060,355 



Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



100 



FOREIGN TRADE 



IMPORTS 

REGULAR AND MINCED FISH BLOCKS AND SLABS IMPORTS, 
BY SPECIES AND TYPE, 1995 AND 1996 



Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



REGULAR AND MINCED FISH BLOCKS AND SLABS IMPORTS, 
BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN. 1995 AND 1996 



Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



GROUNDnSH FILLET AND STEAK IMPORTS, BY SPECIES, 1995 AND 1996 (1) 



Species and type 


1995 


1996 1 


Regular blocks and slabs: 

Cod , 


Thousand 

35,540 
5,732 

12,802 

1,023 

102,029 

27,042 
4,949 


Metric 

tons 

16,121 

2,600 

5,807 

464 

46,280 

12,266 

2,245 


Thousand 

dollacs 

60,064 
10,589 
19,549 

1,465 
71,443 
24,354 

6,773 


Thousand 

pounds 

23,439 
3,433 

12,740 

1,111 

144,234 

16,830 
6,903 


Metric 

tons 

10,632 

1,557 

5,779 

504 

65,424 
7,634 
3,131 


Thousand 

dol lars 

33,755 
6,461 

18,122 

1,872 

109,985 

14,310 
6,450 


Flatfish , 


Haddock , 






Whiting , 


Other , 

Total 


189.117 


S5. 783 


194.237 


208. 690 


94. 661 


250.555 


Minced blocks and slabs , 


21.158 


9.597 


19,329 


25,520 


11.576 


22,368 


Grand total 


210,275 


95, 380 


213, 566 


234,210 


106,237 


213,323 



(1) Does not include data on fish blocks and slabs. 

(2) Includes some quantities of cusk, hake, and pollock fillets. 



Country 


1995 


1996 1 




Thousand 

pounds 


Metric 

tons 


Thousand 

dollars 


Thousand 

pounds. 


Metric 

tons 


Thousand 

dollars. 




42,458 
67,556 


19,259 
30,643 


35,251 
46,310 


74,848 
81,120 


33,951 
36,796 


61,670 
59,366 


China 




17,379 
16,660 


7,883 
7,557 


27,041 
27,842 


16,380 
12,335 


7,430 
5,595 


22,859 

17,485 


Norway 


Canada 


12,884 


5,844 


13,706 


15,227 


6,907 


15,454 


Denmark 


9,627 


4,367 


17,207 


5,333 


2,419 


8,296 


Argent ina , 


8,618 


3,909 


6,718 


9,257 


4,199 


6,890 




5,670 
2,736 


2,572 

1,241 


8,053 
1,981 


3,084 
5,622 


1,399 
2,550 


4,274 
3,726 


Peru 


Other 


26,687 


12,105 


29,457 


11,003 


4,991 


13,303 


Total 


210.275 


55. 380 


213. 566 


234.210 


106.237 


213. 323 



Species 


1995 


1996 


Cod 


Thousand 

75,869 
73,883 
35,093 


Metric 

tans. 

34,414 
33,513 
15,918 


Thousand 

doUairs. 

166,437 

100,589 

56,810 


Thousand 

74,191 
79,031 
24,987 


Metric 

33,653 
35,848 
11,334 


Thousand 

dollars. 

163,986 

102,752 

43,679 


Haddock (2) 


Ocean Perch 


Total 


184, 845 


83, 845 


323. 836 


178,209 


80, 835 


310,417 



Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Cenus. 



FOREIGN TRADE 



101 



IMPORTS 
CANNED TUNA NOT IN OIL, QUOTA AND IMPORTS, 1987-96 



Quota 
(1) 



Over quota 
(2) 



1987. 
1988. 
1989. 
1990. 
1991. 
1992. 
1993. 
1994. 
1995. 
1996. 



Thousand 




Metric 
tons 
41,522 
38,640 
34,806 
39,534 
34,062 
33,441 
32,968 
33,246 
33,279 
36,300 



Thousand 
pounds 
123,365 
193,784 
234,323 
171,472 
237,237 
259,739 
144,287 
168,224 
126,176 
117,205 




Thousand 





(1) Imports have been subject to tariff quotas since April 14, 1956, and are based on 
percent of the previous year's domestic pack, excluding the pack in American Samoa. 
Dutiable in 1956 to 1967 at 12.5 percent ad valorem; 1968, 11 percent; 1969, 10 percent 
1970, 8.5 percent; 1971, 7 percent; and 1972 to 1996, 6 percent. 



(2) 



Dutiable in 1972 to 1996, 12.5 percent. 



Note: — Data in this table will not agree with tuna import data released by the U.S. Department 
of Commerce, Bureau of the Census . Any tuna entered for consumption or withdrawn from a 
warehouse for consumption during the calendar year, except for receipts from insular 
possessions of the U.S., is subject to this quota. 

Source: — U.S. Department of the Treasury, U.S. Customs Service. 



CANNED TUNA, BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN, 1995 AND 1996 



Country 



Thailand. . . . 
Philippines . 
Indonesia. . . 
Malaysia. . . . 

Ecuador 

Spain 

Singapore . . . 
South Korea. 

Mexico 

Other 

Total . . 



Thousand 




215, 365 



55,672 

25,574 

14,238 

1,010 

375 

94 

124 

52 

550 



97, 689 



Thousand 
dollars 

136,589 

51,126 

38,028 

4,245 

738 

555 

348 

213 

1,663 



Thousand 
pounds 

95,869 

64,639 

28,168 

2,079 

906 

247 

212 

203 

375 

340 



233, 505 



193, 037 



43,486 

29,320 

12,777 

943 

411 

112 

96 

92 

170 

154 



67,561 



Thousand 
dol lars 

113,345 

60, 569 

35, 150 

3,753 

852 

675 

374 

359 

277 

538 



215, 892 



Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



102 



FOREIGN TRADE 



IMPORTS 



SHRIMP IMPORTS, BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN, 1995 AND 1996 



Country 



North America: 

Mexico 

Honduras . . . . 

Panama 

El Salvador. 
Guatemala . . . 

Canada 

Nicaragua . . . 
Costa Rica. . 

Belize 

Greenland. . . 
Other 



Total . 

South America: 

Ecuador 

Venezuela. . . 
Colombia . . . . 

Guyana 

Peru 

Brazil 

Chile 

Uruguay 



Total 

Europe : 

European Union: 

Denmark 

Belgium 

United Kingdom. 
Netherlands . . . . 

Portugal 

Other 



Tot»l . 

Other: 

Iceland. . . 
Norway . . . . 
Other 



Total . 

Asia : 

Thailand. . . . 

India 

Indonesia . . . 
Bangladesh. . 

China 

Viet Nam. . . . 
Pakistan . . . . 
Philippines . 
Singapore . . . 
Malaysia . . . . 
Other 



Total . 



Oceania . 
Africa . . 



Grand total. 



Thousand 
pounds 

72,974 

18,616 

18, 922 

8,256 

5,977 

16,323 

7,908 

2,773 

1,321 

487 

531 



154. 088 



114,106 

10,631 

6,861 

7,238 

5,997 

4, 162 

562 

146 



149. 701 



139 
342 
732 

57 
9 

86 



1.365 



119 
130 

15 



265 



171,509 

39,077 

11,775 

10,917 

32,284 

2,877 

4,980 

4,581 

3,724 

2,690 

5,624 



290. 037 



53 
1, 695 



597, 204 



33,101 

8,444 

8,583 

3,745 

2,711 

7,404 

3,587 

1,258 

599 

221 

241 



69,894 



51,758 
4,822 
3,112 
3,283 
2,720 
1,888 
255 
66 



67. 904 



63 

155 
332 

26 
4 

39 



619 



120 



77,796 
17,725 
5,341 
4,952 
14,644 
1,305 
2,259 
2,078 
1,689 
1,220 
2,551 



131.560 



24 
769 



270, 890 



Thousand 
dol lars 

342,874 

66,607 

77,490 

27,706 

18,467 

26,208 

29,705 

12,740 

5,875 

1,533 

1,966 



pounds 

67,873 

19,559 

19,092 

12,079 

9,178 

19,744 

7,432 

3,364 

1,105 

939 

64 



611.171 



160. 429 



443,478 
41,520 
24,842 
18,099 
24,426 
15,768 
2,003 
176 



97, 194 
15,119 
6,695 
8,814 
4,469 
1,997 
664 



570. 312 



134. 952 



502 

1327 

3, 184 

374 

17 

289 



787 

278 

256 

22 

13 
9 



5.693 



1.365 



550 
552 

10 



494 

291 

2 



1.112 



787 



981,088 
109,957 
58,568 
65,700 
79,515 
16,622 
13,014 
21,727 
14,984 
8,907 
19,614 



160,310 

41,773 

21,792 

20,357 

17,077 

5,686 

5,355 

2,676 

1,958 

1,814 

5,567 



1.389.696 



284. 365 



362 
2,545 



60 

514 



2, 580, 891 



582, 471 



30,787 

8,872 

8, 660 

5,479 

4,163 

8,956 

3,371 

1,526 

501 

426 

29 



72. 770 



44,087 
6,858 
3,037 
3,998 
2,027 
906 
301 



61.214 



357 

126 

116 

10 

6 

4 



619 



224 
132 

1 



357 



72,716 

18,948 

9,885 

9,234 

7,746 

2,579 

2,429 

1,214 

888 

823 

2,525 



128. 987 



27 
233 



264, 207 



Note: — Statistics on imports are the weights of the 

raw headless, peeled, etc. 

Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the 



individual products as exported, i.e. 



FOREIGN TRADE 

IMPORTS 
SHRIMP IMPORTS, BY TYPE OF PRODUCT, 1995 AND 1996 



103 



Type of product 



Shell-on (heads off) . . . 
Peeled: 

Canned 

Not breaded: 

Raw 

Other 

Breaded 

Total 

Source: — U.S. Department 



327,295 

6,570 

226,684 

35,234 

1,422 



597, 204 




102,823 

15, 982 

645 



Thousand 
do1 1ars 

1,482,667 

16,061 

876,832 

198,667 

6,664 



Thousand 



318,000 

3,563 

206,670 

53,766 

472 



270, 890 I 2, 560, 891 



582,471 




93,745 
24, 388 

214 



264,207 



Thousand 
dol lars 

1,393,216 

9,032 

763,008 

289,809 

2,435 



2, 457, 500 



of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 




FISH MEAL AND SCRAP IMPORTS, BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN, 1995 AND 1996 



Country 


1995 


1996 




Thousand 
pounds 

18,666 
24,886 

9,266 
23,212 
23,763 

3,300 
35,847 

161 


Metric 
tons 

8,467 
11,288 

4,203 
10,529 
10,779 

1,497 
16,260 

73 


Thousand 
dollars, 

3,673 
3,764 
2,477 
6,613 
3,845 
737 
3,449 

100 


Thousand 
pounds 

38,197 

30,554 

13,252 

13,419 

16,883 

11,243 

11,155 

439 

152 

267 


Metric 
tons 

17,326 

13,859 

6,011 

6,087 

7,658 

5, 100 

5,060 

199 

69 

121 


Thousand 
dol lars 

8,968 

7,076 

4,335 

4,281 

3,633 

3,302 

1,965 

141 

102 

178 


Chile 
















Other 


Total 


139, 101 


€3, 096 


24,658 


135,561 


61,490 


33, 981 


Source: — U.S. Department 


of Commerce 


Bureau of t 


,he Census. 









104 



FOREIGN TRADE 



2000 



1500 



03 1000 

_i 

o 

Q 

500 



U.S. EXPORTS OF EDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1996 
TO MAJOR MARKETS 




Canada 



E.U. 



Other Asia Other Europe 



Other 



500 



U.S. EXPORTS OF EDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1996 
BY MAJOR GROUP 




Salmon Crabs Flatfish Lobsters Roe 

Surimi Shrimp Groundfish Canned salmon 



FOREIGN TRADE 



105 



EXPORTS 



FISHERY PRODUCTS EXPORTS, BY PRINCIPAL ITEMS, 1995 AND 1996 (1) 



Item 



Edible fishery products: 
Fresh and frozen: 
Whole or eviscerated: 

Freshwater 

Flatfish 

Groundfish 

Herring 

Sablef ish 

Salmon 

Tuna 

Other 

Fillets, and steaks: 

Freshwater 

Groundfish 

Other 

Blocks and slabs 

Surimi 

Fish sticks 

Clams 

Crabs 

Crabmeat 

Lobsters 

Scallops (meats) 

Sea urchins 

Shrimp 

Squid 

Other fish and shellfish 
Total, fraah and frozan 
Canned: 

Salmon 

Sardines 

Tuna 

Abalone 

Crabmeat 

Shrimp 

Squid 

Other fish and shellfish 

Total, eaiuiad 

Cured: 

Dried 

Pickled or salted 

Smoked or kippered 

Total, ctirad 

Caviar and roe: 

Herring 

Pollock 

Salmon 

Sea Urchin 

Other 

Total, caviar and roo. . 

Prepared meals 

Other fish and shellfish. 

Total adlbla tiahary 

products 

Nonedible fishery products : 

Meal and scrap 

Fish oils 

Other 

Total nonadlbla flahary 

producta 

Grand total 



Thousand 



1, 763, 656 



98, 197 

11,773 

7,385 

880 

276 

3,250 

6,382 

14,233 



142, 375 



6, 120 

6,629 

492 



13,241 



28,428 
33,274 
25,082 
8,527 
12,513 



107. a25 



4,429 
15,655 



2. 047. 181 



176,981 
260,394 



tons 

2, 109 

90,034 
54,424 
43,080 
17, 346 

150,669 
13,095 

112,039 

138 
11, 161 
11,737 
16,642 
135,417 
13,709 

987 
21,264 

691 
16,768 
2,688 
2,887 
17,782 
54, 575 
10,747 



799. 989 



44,542 
5,340 
3,350 
399 
125 
1,474 
2,895 
6,456 



64.581 



2,776 

3,007 

223 



6, 006 



Thousand 
dol Tars 

6, 116 
160,909 
119,043 

69,658 
101,000 
553,751 

44,098 
226,030 

1,003 
31,534 
46,306 
37,729 

353,496 

42,479 

3,679 

204,710 
4,841 

176, 920 
19,242 
13,473 

156, 681 
66,561 
48,964 



Thousand 



2.488,223 



1,798, 766 



175,392 

8,915 

10,957 

7,026 

741 

17,048 

3,366 

13, 158 



95,530 

12,207 

9,866 

805 

337 

2,665 

7,608 

26,389 



236. 603 



155. 407 



15,198 
8,368 
2, 375 



9,431 

12,665 

1,096 



25, 941 



23.192 



12,895 

15,093 

11,377 

3,868 

5,676 



48. 909 



2,009 
7,101 



928. 595 



80,278 

118,114 



38,406 
144,343 
128,882 
130,264 

53,800 



495. 695 



5,896 
9,884 



3. 262. 242 



41,331 

44,214 

4, 964, 547 



5. 005. 878 



8, 268, 120 



34,806 
29,284 
27,952 
7,167 
11,680 



110. 889 



tons 

2,154 
81,267 
63,431 
36,227 
17,108 

125,634 
14,235 

135,652 

322 

18,911 

14,500 

29,134 

129,140 

9,856 

1,207 

21,202 

1,409 

18,778 

2,808 

2,550 

17,526 

62, 162 

10,702 



815, 915 



43,332 

5,537 

4,475 

365 

153 

1,209 

3,451 

11,970 



70. 492 



4,278 

5,745 

497 



10.520 



15,788 

13,283 

12,679 

3,251 

5,298 



SO. 299 



Thousand 
dol lars 

6,742 

140,753 

112,375 

53,131 

93,756 

469,812 

38,278 

245,564 

2,206 
44,399 
52,887 
60,481 

269,754 

29,555 

4,594 

162,403 
6,094 

195,261 
22,318 
12,998 

145,064 
69,419 
56,654 



2.294.498 



154,093 
9,623 

14,937 
5,427 
1,358 

11,581 
4,404 

22,393 



223.816 



19,653 

19,090 

3,150 



41.893 



51,638 
154,633 

91 ,115 
107,36 

39,467 



450.897 



1,975 
21,826 



2.112.055 



186,412 
187,294 



896 
9,900 



958, 022 



84,556 
84, 956 



2,848 

18,330 



3. 032. 282 



52, 931 

36,423 

5, 568,238 



5.621.169 



8, 653, 451 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-exports) 



Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



106 



FOREIGN TRADE 

EXPORTS 

FISHERY PRODUCTS EXPORTS, 1987-96 (1) 



Year 


Edible 




Nonedible 


Total 1 


1987 


Thousand 
pounds 

806,116 
1,085,935 
1,405,977 
1,947,292 
2,058,594 
2,087,606 
1,986,027 
1,978,507 
2,047, 181 
2,112,055 


Metric, 
tons 

365,652 
492,577 
637,747 
883,286 
933,772 
946,932 
900,856 
897,445 
928,595 
958,022 


- - - - -Thousand dollars- - - - - 

1,625,385 96,725 1,722,110 
2,213,326 125,061 2,338,387 
2,355,603 2,582,538 4,938,141 
2,881,262 3,084,677 5,965,939 
3,155,771 3,386,037 6,541,808 
3,465,667 3,653,965 7,119,632 
3,076,813 3,847,911 6,924,724 
3,126,120 4,254,741 7,380,861 
3,262,242 5,005,878 8,268,120 
3,032,282 5,621,169 8,653,451 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 



;h domestic and foreign (re-exports) . 

NOTE: — The increase in the nonedible value beginning in 1989 is due to re-examination of 
commodities that are considered to be based on fishery products including fish, shellfish, 
aquatic plants and animals and any products thereof, including processed and manufactured 
products . 

Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 




FOREIGN TRADE 



107 



EXPORTS 
EDIBLE AND NONEDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS EXPORTS, 1996 (1) 



Continent and Country 



Nonedible 



North America: 

Canada 

Mexico 

Panama 

Dominican Republic. 

Netherlands Antilles 

Other 

Total 

South America: 

Brazil 

Argentina 

Colombia 

Chile 

Venezuela 

Other 



Total 

Europe : 

European Union: 
United Kingdom. 

France 

Germany 

Netherlands . . . . 

Belgium 

Other 



Total . . . 
Other: 

Switzerland. 

Russia 

Norway 

Poland 

Turkey 

Other 



Total . 

Asia : 

Japan 

South Korea. 
Hong Kong. . . 

Taiwan 

Singapore . . . 
Other 



Total 

Oceania : 

Australia 

New Zealand 

French Polynesia. . . . 

Fiji 

Fed States of Micron 
Other 

Total 

Africa : 

South Africa 

Egypt 

Nigeria 

Mauritius 

Zimbabwe 

Other 

Total 

Grand total . . . 



Thousand 



323,869 

19, 683 

1,669 

3,139 

930 

17,773 



3g7. 0€4 



924 
465 

3,362 
628 

2,941 

4,050 



12. 370 



55,036 
50,386 
16,385 
13,554 
10,408 
84,734 



230. 502 



992 
13,393 

8,909 
333 
657 

9,458 



33. 741 



1,005,040 

186,095 

26,164 

23,016 

4,458 

174, 611 



1.419.3B3 



31,005 

1,468 

489 

1,475 

725 



35,163 



2,745 

6,316 

4,026 

254 

4 92 



13. 832 



2, 112, 055 



146, 906 
8, 928 

757 
1,424 

422 
8,062 



16€. 499 



419 
211 

1,525 
285 

1,334 

1,837 



5,fll 



24, 964 

22,855 

7,432 

6,148 

4,721 

38,435 



104.555 



450 

6,075 

4,041 

151 

298 

4,290 



15.305 



J55,883 
84,412 
11,868 
10,440 
2,022 
79,203 



643. B2B 



14,064 
666 
222 
669 

329 



15. 950 



1,245 
2,865 
1,826 

115 

223 



6.274 



958, 022 



526,885 

38,954 

2,186 

3,506 

1,771 

24,578 



-Thousand dollars- 

1,191,546 

343,312 

44,875 

32,821 

33,171 

139,600 



597. 880 



1,490 
398 

2,082 
864 

1,597 

4,673 



11.104 



89,368 
80,547 
26,061 
23,296 

16, 671 
111,160 



347.103 



2,737 

5,458 

10,504 

342 

563 

6,621 



26.225 



1,623,322 

146,049 

50,342 

65,075 

5,468 

126,271 



2.016.527 



24,980 

1,461 

607 

774 

692 



28. 514 



2,106 

1,479 

550 

83 

711 



4.929 



3, 032, 282 



1.785.325 



139,930 
55,775 
45,253 
44,790 
37,261 

80,928 



403. 937 



245,817 
144,419 
170,444 
147,975 
119,461 
218,843 



325,994 

23,115 

14,005 

9,318 

5,596 

21,387 



399. 415 



627,032 
208,615 
301,955 
131,673 
133,940 
416,966 



1.820.181 



97,000 

18,164 

1,236 

319 

741 

954 



118.414 



32,767 
4,788 
2,385 
1,342 
1,348 
4,308 



46. 938 



5, 621, 169 



1,718,431 

382,266 

47,061 

36,327 

34,942 

164,178 



2.383.205 



141,420 
56,173 
47,335 
45,654 
38,858 

85,601 



415. 041 



335,185 
224,966 

196,505 
171,271 
136,132 
330,003 



1, 394. 062 



328,731 

28,573 

24,509 

9,660 

6,159 

28,008 



425. 640 



2,250,354 
354,664 
352,297 
196,748 
139,408 
543,237 



3. 836. 708 



121,980 

19,625 

1,843 

1,093 

741 

1,64 6 



14g. 928 



34,873 
6,267 
2,935 
1,425 
1,348 
5,019 



51. 867 



8, 653, 451 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-exports) 



Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



108 



FOREIGN TRADE 



EXPORTS 

FRESH AND FROZEN SHRIMP EXPORTS, 
BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION, 1995 AND 1996 (1) 



Country 



Canada 

Mexico 

Japan 

Thailand. . . . 

China 

Honduras. . . . 

Norway 

Hong Kong. . . 
South Korea. 

Other 

Total . . 



Thnnsand 
pounds 

19, 553 
7,577 
2,456 

679 
2,480 

520 
1,155 

269 

439 
4,074 



39,202 



8,869 

3,437 

1,114 

308 

1,125 

236 

524 

122 

199 

1,848 



1 7, 782 



84,428 

25,238 

12,149 

2, 640 

7,435 

2,566 

4, 597 

900 

2,012 

14, 716 



Thou.'iand 
pound.'; 

19,015 

7,211 

2,284 

1, 687 

1, 975 

904 

820 

941 

500 

3,300 



156, 661 



38, 638 



8, 625 

3,271 

1, 036 

765 

896 

410 

372 

427 

227 

1, 497 



17,526 



74,828 

24,123 

11,286 

6,086 

5,071 

3,869 

3,567 

2,337 

2,027 

11,870 



145, 064 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-export). 
Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 




CANNED SHRIMP EXPORTS, 
BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION, 1995 AND 1996 (1) 



Country 



Thousand 

pnunds 



Canada 

Thailand. . . . 

Ecuador 

Belgium 

South Korea. 

Greece 

Indonesia. . . 
Philippines. 
Hong Kong. . . 

Other 

Total . . 



937 
606 
238 

99 
181 
470 
126 

40 



3,250 



275 
108 



213 
57 



1,474 



4,586 

4,379 

1,527 

617 

1,231 

394 

670 

248 

84 

3, 312 

1 7, 048 



Thousand 
pounds 

963 

437 

207 

132 

84 

538 

57 

51 

37 

159 

2,665 



437 

198 

94 

60 

38 

244 



4,739 

2,281 

1,315 

818 

520 

427 

348 

283 

224 

626 

11,581 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-export) . 
Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



FOREIGN TRADE 



109 



EXPORTS 

FRESH AND FROZEN SALMON EXPORTS, WHOLE OR EVISCERATED, 
BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION, 1995 AND 1996 (1) 



Country 



Japan 

Canada 

France 

Denmark 

Taiwan 

Belgium 

China 

Sweden 

United Kingdom. 
Other 



213, 637 

69,566 

16, 601 

4,577 

2,176 

3, 880 

3,205 

3,342 

2,705 

12,476 



Total . 



332, 1 65 



96, 905 
31,555 
7,530 
2,076 
987 
1,760 
1,454 
1,516 
1,227 
5, 659 



150, 669 



Thonsand 
do1 1 flr.s 

421,094 

71,277 

20,139 

5,000 

5,291 

4, 680 

4,297 

3,306 

2,842 

15, 825 




553, 751 



80,033 
25,204 
5,071 
2,421 
1,316 
2,068 
978 
1,645 
1,062 
5,836 



125, €34 



Thousand 
dol 1 ar.s 

344,756 

73, 794 

11,068 

5,973 

5,333 

5,288 

3,182 

3,084 

2, 460 

14,874 



4€9,812 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-exports). 
Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 




CANNED SALMON EXPORTS, BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION. 1995 AND 1996 (1) 



Country 



United Kingdom. 

Canada 

Australia 

Netherlands. . . . 

Belgium 

France 

Ireland 

Sweden 

New Zealand. . . . 
Other 



Total . 



,881 
,299 
,869 
,518 
,132 
243 
741 



98,197 



20,358 

14,197 

4,023 

3,410 

967 

110 

336 

312 
829 



86, 688 
52,843 
15,468 
11,764 

3,033 
323 

1,229 

1,131 
2, 913 

I 75, 392 



Thousand 
pounds 

40,809 

29,297 

12,225 

6,329 

1,270 
611 
650 
520 
672 
3,146 

95, 530 



18,511 

13,289 

5,545 

2,871 

576 

277 

295 

236 

305 



73,252 

42,845 

18,103 

10,148 

1,826 

1,085 

966 

900 

881 

4,087 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-exports) . 
Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



no 



FOREIGN TRADE 



EXPORTS 

FRESH AND FROZEN CRAB EXPORTS, 
BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION, 1995 AND 1996 (1) 



Country 



Japan 

Canada 

China 

Thailand 

United Kingdom. 
South Korea. . . . 

Hong Kong 

Mexico 

France 

Other 

Total . . . 



Thousand 
pounds 

38,706 

6,186 

1,206 

148 

68 

121 

90 

24 

40 

289 



Metri c 
tons 



17,557 

2,806 

547 

67 

31 
55 

41 
11 
18 

131 



184,172 

12, 672 

4,865 

736 

333 

415 

467 

81 

110 

859 



Thousand 

pounds 

35,044 

8, 702 

1, 962 

216 

104 

86 

51 

79 

108 

390 



4€, 742 



15,896 
3, 947 

890 
98 
47 
39 
23 
36 
49 

177 



21,202 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-exports) 
Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



FRESH AND FROZEN CRABMEAT EXPORTS, 
BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION, 1995 AND 1996 (1) 



Country 



Thousand 
pounds 



Japan 

Russia 

Canada 

South Korea 

Thailand 

Hong Kong 

Netherlands Antilles. 

Netherlands 

China 

Other 

Total 



2 

106 
26 

115 

148 

46 



58f 



1,523 



189 
340 



1, 409 



Thousand 
pounds 

853 

547 

126 

198 

243 

236 

86 

95 

97 

626 



4,841 



387 

248 

57 

90 

110 

107 

39 

43 

44 

284 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-exports) 
Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



FRESH AND FROZEN HERRING EXPORTS, WHOLE OR EVISCERATED 
BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION, 1995 AND 1996 (1) 



Country 



Japan 

Canada 

China 

Egypt 

Russia 

South Korea. . 

Nigeria 

Other 

Total . 



54 


952 


8 


874 


23 


576 


1 


724 




302 


5 


190 




357 



94, 974 



24, 926 

4,025 
10, 694 

782 

137 

2, 354 

162 



43, 080 



52,786 

5,087 

10,734 

443 
229 
224 

155 



po\inds 

30,516 
20,759 
6,065 
5,897 
8, 984 
855 
3, 993 
2,798 



79, 866 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-exports) 
Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



13,842 
9,416 
2,751 
2, 675 
4,075 
388 
1,811 
1,269 



36,227 



FOREIGN TRADE 



111 



EXPORTS 



FISH AND MARINE ANIMAL OIL EXPOFTTS, 
BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION, 1995 AND 1996 (1) 



Country 



Netherlands. 

Canada 

Mexico 

South Korea. 

Japan 

China 

Spain 

Taiwan 

Hong Kong. . . 
Other 



176,461 

41,579 

3,305 

4,123 

20,201 

31 

5, 950 

126 

2,222 

6.398 



260, 394 



80,042 

18,860 

1,499 

1,870 

9,163 

14 

2, 699 

57 

1,008 

2. 902 



118,114 



Tho\ia^nd 



27, 612 

8, 661 

725 

1,151 

3,280 

295 

801 

37 

475 

1.177 



Thousand 
pounds 

99,416 

55, 904 

14,888 

8,719 

3,673 

1,003 

2,864 

381 

51 

395 



44,214 



45, 095 

25,358 

6,753 

3,955 

1, 666 

455 

1,299 

173 

23 

179 



84, 9se 



16,248 

13,013 

3,229 

1,905 
657 
631 
395 
102 
91 
152 



36, 423 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-exports), 
Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 




FISH MEAL EXPORTS. BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION, 1995 AND 1996 (1) 



Country 



Taiwan 

China 

Canada 

Japan 

Philippines. . 

Italy 

Thailand 

Hong Kong. . . . 

Germany 

Other 

Total. 



Thousand 
pounds 

53,358 
22,324 

30,818 
21,874 

21,744 

35 

1,563 

7,156 

7 

IS. 102 



1 76, 981 



24,203 

10,126 

13, 979 

9, 922 

9,863 

16 

709 

3,246 

3 

8.211 



Thousand 
dni 1 ars 

12,168 
5,563 
6,961 
4, 944 
3,505 

22 
1,203 
1, 695 

44 
5.22£. 



Thousand 
pounds 

49,456 

24,486 

31,274 

20,719 

19,868 

11,409 

1,164 

6,261 

7,145 

14.630 



80, 278 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-exports) 
Source: — U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



41,331 



186,412 



22, 433 

11,107 

14,186 

9,398 

9,012 

5,175 

528 

2,840 

3,241 

6. 636 



84, 556 



13,882 
7, 653 
7,224 
5,683 
4,567 
2,812 
2,651 
1, 688 
1,419 
5.352 



52, 931 



112 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



CO 

O 
D 
Q 
O 
Q< 
Q. 

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Q -« O) 



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(0 




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+-< 

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Q. 

£ 



C 

C 
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O 

i_ 



E 

E 
o 
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SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



113 



U.S. SUPPLY OF EDIBLE AND INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1987-96 

(Round weight) 



Year 


Domestic commercial 
landinqs (1) 


Imports 
(2) 


Total 


1987 


Million 
pounds 

6,896 
7,192 
8,463 
9,404 
9,484 
9,637 
10,467 
10,461 
9,788 
9,565 


Percent, 

43.8 
49.2 
54.7 
57.5 
58.0 
59.8 
51.5 
54.2 
59.4 
58.1 


Million, 

pounds 

8,848 
7,436 
7,022 
6,945 
6,879 
6,469 
9,867 
8,848 
6,696 
6,909 


Percent 

56.2 
50.8 
45.3 
42.5 
42.0 
40.2 
48.5 
45.8 
40.6 
41.9 


Mi 1 1 ion 
pounds 

15,744 
14,628 
15,485 
16,349 
16,363 
16,106 
20,334 
19,309 
16,484 
16,474 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 



(1) Preliminary. 

(2) Excludes imports of edible fishery products consumed in Puerto Rico, but includes landings 
of foreign-caught tuna in American Samoa. 

Note: — The weights of U.S. landings and imports represent the round (live) weight of all items 
except univalve and bivalve mollusks (conchs, clams, oysters, scallops, etc.) which are shown 
in weight of meats (excluding the shell) . 



U.S. SUPPLY OF EDIBLE COMMERCIAL FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1987-96 
(Round weight) 



Year 


Domestic commercial 
landings (1) 


Imports 
(2) 


Total 


1987 


Million 

pounds, 

3,946 
4,588 
6,204 
7,041 
7,031 
7,618 
8,214 
7,936 
7,667 
7,475 


Percent 

37.4 
43.7 
50.6 
55.6 
54.0 
57.5 
59.4 
57.9 
56.4 
54.9 


Million, 

pounds 

6,615 
5,917 
6,064 
5,621 
5,989 
5,624 
5,607 
5,778 
5,917 
6,150 


Percent, 

62.6 
56.3 
49.4 
44.4 
46.0 
42.5 
40.6 
42.1 
43.6 
45.1 


Million 

pounds. 

10,561 
10,505 
12,268 
12,662 
13,020 
13,242 
13,821 
13,714 
13,584 
13,625 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 



(1) Preliminary. 

(2) Excludes imports of edible fishery products consumed in Puerto Rico, but includes landings 
of foreign-caught tuna in American Samoa. 



U.S. SUPPLY OF INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1987-96 
(Round weight) 



Year 


Domestic commercial 
landings (1) 


Imports 


Total 


1987 


Million, 
pounds 

2,950 
2,604 
2,259 
2,363 
2,453 
2,019 
2,253 
2,525 
2,121 
2,090 


Percent 

56.9 
63.2 
70.2 
64.1 
73.4 
70.5 
34.6 
45.1 
73.1 
73.4 


Million 
pounds 

2,233 

1,519 

958 

1,324 

890 

845 

4,260 

3,070 

779 

759 


Percent 

43.1 
36.8 
29.8 
35.9 
26.6 
29.5 
65.4 
54.9 
26.9 
26.6 


Million 

pounds 

5,183 
4,123 
3,217 
3,687 
3,343 
2,864 
6,513 
5,595 
2,900 
2,849 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 



(1) Preliminary. 



114 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



U.S. SUPPLY OF COMMERCIAL FINFISH AND SHELLFISH, 1995 AND 1996 



Item 


Domestic commercial 
landings 


Imports (1) 


Total 


1995 


1996 


1995 


1996 


1995 


1996 


Edible fishery products: 


\JI ' 


11* J ^ ' V 


1 


6,414 
1,252 


6,205 
1,271 


4,278 
1,639 


4,494 10,692 
1,656 2,891 


10,699 
2,927 


Shellfish 


Total 


7.667 


7.476 


5.917 


6.150 


13. 584 


I?. «f 


Industrial fishery 
products : 
Finfish 


2,106 

15 


2,068 

21 


779 
(3) 


759 
(3) 


2,885 

15 


2,827 
21 


Shellfish 


Total 


2,121 


2.089 


779 


759 


2.900 


2.848 


Total: 

Finfish 


8,520 
1,267 


8,273 
1,292 


5,057 
1,639 


5,253 
1,656 


13,577 
2,906 


13,526 
2,948 


Shellfish 


Total 


9,788 


9,565 


6,696 


6,909 


16, 484 


16, 474 



See footnotes below. 



VALUE OF U.S. 


SUPPLY OF COMMERCIAL FINFISH AND SHELLFISH, 1995 AND 1996 


Item 


Domestic commercial 
landings 


Imports (1) 


Total 


1995 


1996 


1995 


1996 


1995 


1996 


Edible fishery products: 
Finfish 


n • 1 1 ■ .J 1 1 




1,783 
1,808 


1,667 
1,688 


2,904 
3,888 


2,974 
3,756 


4,687 
5,696 


4,641 
5,444 


Shellfish 


Total 


3.591 


3.355 


6,792 


6.730 


10. 383 


10. 085 


Industrial fishery 
products: 
Finfish 


133 
12 


124 
8 


25 
(3) 


34 
(3) 


158 
12 


158 
8 


Shellfish 


Total 


145 


132 


(2) 2S 


(2> 34 


170 


166 


Total: 

Finfish 


1,916 
1,820 


1,791 
1,696 


2,929 
3,888 


3,008 
3,756 


4,845 
5,708 


4,799 
5,452 


Shellfish 


Total 


3,736 


3,487 


6,817 


6,764 


10, 553 


10,251 



(1) Excludes imports of edible fishery products consumed in Puerto Rico, but includes landings ol 

foreign-caught tuna in American Samoa. 

(2) Includes only quantity and value of fish meal. 

(3) Not available. 



Note: — Value of domestic commercial landings is exvessel value. 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



115 



U.S. SUPPLY OF REGULAR AND MINCED BLOCKS, 1987-96 
(Edible weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
Production 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 
(1) 


Total 
Supply 


1987 


13,559 
44,602 
30,898 
9,739 
22,013 
66,898 
37,860 
27,960 
38,460 
69,789 


403,577 
303,237 
283,278 
264,468 
290,485 
229,314 
211,569 
199,607 
210,275 
234,210 


Thousand pounds 






(2) 
(2) 
35,296 
34,255 
14,502 
41,588 
38, 199 
59,908 
36,689 
64,229 


417,136 
347,839 
278,880 
239,952 
297,996 
254,624 
211,230 
167,659 
212,046 
239,770 


417,136 
347,839 
314,176 
274,207 
312,498 
296,212 
249,429 
227,567 
248,735 
303,999 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 



(1) For the period 1989-1991 data is estimated based on removal of surimi which was included 
in the export classification. (2) Not reported. 



U.S. SUPPLY OF ALL FILLETS AND STEAKS, 1987-96 
(Edible weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
Production (1) 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
Supply 


1987 


356,081 
378,236 
371,082 
440,692 
472,668 
448,664 
420,169 
425,022 
385,293 
397,965 


620,985 
517,709 
517,620 
458,413 
440,018 
408,059 
440,354 
439,059 
477,483 
476,469 


Thousand pounds 






66,036 
100,301 
68,931 
51,599 
69,086 
52,247 
48,847 
43,252 
50,785 
74,368 


911,030 
795,644 
819,771 
847,506 
843,600 
804,476 
811,676 
820,829 
811,991 
800,066 


977,066 
895,945 
888,702 
899,105 
912,686 
856,723 
860,523 
864,081 
862,776 
874,434 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 



(1) Includes fillets used to produce blocks. 



U.S. SUPPLY OF GROUNDFISH FILLETS AND STEAKS, 1987-96 
(Edible weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
Production (1) 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 
(2) 


Total 
Supply 


1987 


•P^,^llc=.r^^ T^r^iinrlc 1 


199,743 
206,786 
211,498 
258,809 
264,323 
252,358 
233,755 
220,357 
216,699 
220,102 


315,418 
253,187 
265,001 
200,980 
202,409 
172,755 
186,516 
189,097 
184,845 
178,209 


515,161 
459,973 
476,499 
459,789 
466,732 
425,113 
420,271 
409,454 
401,544 
398,311 


12,341 
14,417 
9,652 
6,944 
34,442 
17,507 
12,242 
17,639 
24,606 
41,691 


502,820 
445,556 
466,847 
452,845 
432,290 
407,606 
408,029 
391,815 
376,938 
356,620 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


2994 


1995 


1996 



(1) Includes fillets used to produce blocks. Species include: cod, cusk, haddock, hake, 
pollock, and ocean perch. (2) Species include: cod 1987-96; pollock 1991-96. 



116 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



U.S. SUPPLY OF FRESH AND FROZEN TUNA, 1987-96 
(Round weight) 



Year 


U.S. commercial landings (1) 


Imports (2) 


Exports 
Total 


Total 
supply 


For 


Other 


Total 


For 


Other 


Total 




canninq 






canninq 










1987 


507,872 


119,783 


627,655 


Thousan 


, , 










578,883 


(3) 


1,206,538 


562,220 


16,663 


1988 


486,640 


122,935 


609,575 


538,588 


18,900 


557,488 


(3) 


1,167,063 


1989 


452,278 


87,823 


540, 101 


625,738 


38,564 


664,302 


17,478 


1,186,925 


1990 


391,954 


119,955 


511,909 


526,496 


37,826 


564,322 


19,773 


1,056,458 


1991 


346,322 


178,025 


524,347 


579,556 


50,290 


629,846 


17,714 


1,136,479 


1992 


435,924 


137,933 


573,857 


482,677 


63,524 


546,201 


20,011 


1, 100,047 


1993 


426,036 


62,933 


488,969 


453,046 


92,965 


546,011 


21,660 


1,013,320 


1994 


401,732 


157,695 


559,427 


469,514 


92,352 


561,866 


28,512 


1,092,781 


1995 


407,036 


86,956 


493,992 


531,266 


105,304 


636,570 


28,869 


1,101,693 


1996 


364,652 


91,612 


456,264 


567,266 


119,247 


686,513 


31,382 


1,111,395 



(1) Includes a quantity of fish landed at other ports by U.S. -flag vessels. 

(2) Includes landings in American Samoa of foreign caught fish. 

(3) Not reported. 



U.S. SUPPLY OF FRESH AND FROZEN TUNA 

(Round weight) 




91 92 

YEAR 



For canning E13 Other 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



117 



U.S. SUPPLY OF CANNED SARDINES, 1987-96 
(Canned weight) 



U.S. 

pack 



Imports 



Exports 



Total 
supply 



13, 116 


65,022 


18,611 


53,359 


13,221 


56,379 


13,240 


56,963 


13,986 


48,515 


17,437 


36,511 


14,354 


39,111 


15,560 


43,942 


13,567 


42,280 


17,672 


40,926 



■ Thousand pounds 
78,138 
71,970 
69,600 
70,203 
62,501 
53,948 
53,465 
59,502 
55,847 

58,598 



1,157 

8,717 

9,070 

9,048 

10,668 

12,690 

12,275 

11,010 

11,773 

12,207 



76,981 
63,253 
60,530 
61, 155 
51,833 
41,258 
41,190 
48,492 
44,074 
46,391 



U.S. SUPPLY OF CANNED SALMON, 1987-96 
(Canned weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
pack 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1987 


105,206 
88,419 
197,044 
196,383 
195,744 
149,453 
198,344 
206,841 
243,568 
197,163 


6,652 

3,528 

2,943 

1,378 

983 

974 

428 

1,093 

1,202 

2,266 


-Thousand pounds- 
Ill, 858 
91,947 
199,987 
197,761 
196,727 
150,427 
198,772 
207,934 
244,770 
199,429 


36,108 
32,993 
40,497 
49,546 
66,134 
77,895 
84,610 
90,915 
98,197 
95,530 


75,750 
58,954 
159,490 
148,215 
130,593 
72,532 
114,162 
117,019 
146,573 
103,899 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 



U.S. SUPPLY OF CANNED TUNA, 1987-96 
(Canned weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
pack 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1987 


653,983 
598,181 
686,267 
580,601 
592,786 
608,981 
618,743 
609,514 
666,581 
675,816 


211,685 
244,504 
348,212 
284,593 
351,744 
323,413 
224,419 
249,043 
215,365 
193,037 








865,668 
842,685 
1,034,479 
865,194 
944,530 
932,394 
843,162 
858,557 
881,946 
868,853 


(1) 

(1) 

6,495 

9,039 
11,310 
10,141 
8,534 
8,391 
7,385 
9,866 


865,668 
842,685 
1,027,984 
856,155 
933,220 
922,253 
834,628 
850,166 
874,561 
858,987 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


(1) Not reported. 













118 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



U.S. SUPPLY OF KING CRAB, 1987-96 
(Round weight) 



Year 


U.S. commercial 
landinqs 


Imports 
(1) 


Total 


Exports 
(1) 


Total 
supply 


1987 


29,065 
20,973 
26,391 
33,917 
28, 140 
19,056 
24,732 
11,960 
14,673 
21,000 


(2) 
(2) 

5,150 

4,925 

7,087 

11,958 

7,395 

15,035 

18,360 

26,533 


-Thousand pounds- 

29,065 
20,973 
31,541 
38,842 
35,227 
31,014 
32,127 
26,995 
33,033 
47,533 


15,039 
10,554 
(3) 13,196 
(3) 19,486 
15,320 
16,241 
24,372 
15,013 
11,847 
17,650 


14,026 
10,419 
18,345 
19,356 
19,907 
14,773 
7,755 
11,982 
21,186 
29,883 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 



(1) Imports, exports, foreign exports converted to round (live) weight by using these 
conversion factors: frozen, 1.75; meat, 4.50; and canned, 5.33 (2) Not reported. 
(3) Estimated, based on available foreign import data. 



U.S. SUPPLY OF SNOW (TANNER) CRABS, 1987-96 
(Round weight) 



U.S. commercial 
landings 



Imports 
(1) 



Exports 
(2) 



Total 
supply 



1987. 
1988. 
1989. 
1990. 
1991. 
1992. 
1993. 
1994. 
1995. 
1996. 



-Thousand pounds- 



113,812 
146,326 
164,643 
213,395 
357,122 
350,039 
255,733 
159,574 
80,817 
67,867 



7,706 
6,765 
3,927 
10,772 
19,091 
18,882 
31,224 
27,446 
20,969 
28,336 



121 


518 




92 


644 


153 


091 




122 


741 


168 


570 


(3) 


111, 


028 


224 


167 


(3) 


187, 


069 


376 


213 


(3) 


316, 


162 


368 


921 




281 


214 


286 


957 




220 


618 


187 


020 




147 


006 


101 


786 




59 


805 


96 


203 




50 


509 



28,874 
30,350 
57,542 
37,098 
60,051 
87,707 
66,339 
40,014 
41,981 
45,694 



(1) Converted to round (live) weight by multiplying fresh and frozen by 1.50; meat, 4.50; 
and canned, 5.00. (2) Domestic merchandise converted to round (live) weight by 
multiplying frozen weight by 2.13 (belived to be mostly sections); meat, 4.50; and canned. 
Foreign exports converted using the same factors as imports. (3) Estimated, based on 
available foreign import data. 



5.33. 



U.S. SUPPLY OF CANNED CRABMEAT, 1987-96 
(Canned weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
paclc 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1987 




, , , 1 


200 

359 

504 

695 

77 

99 

70 

17 

65 

93 


7,967 

7,720 

8,280 

8,563 

11,385 

9,577 

9,817 

9,852 

12,441 

12,773 


8, 167 

8,079 

8,784 

9,258 

11,462 

9,676 

9,887 

9,869 

12,506 

12,866 


63 

250 
930 
434 
525 
789 
668 
511 
276 
337 


8,104 

7,829 

7,854 

8,824 

10,937 

8,887 

9,219 

9,358 

12,230 

12,529 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



119 



U.S. SUPPLY OF AMERICAN LOBSTERS,1987-96 
(Round weight) 



Year 


U.S. commercial 
landings 


Imports 
(1) 


Total 


Exports 
(2) 


Total 
supply 


1987 


45,558 
48,643 
52,926 
61,017 
63,337 
55,841 
56,513 
66,416 
66,406 
71,641 


70,207 
72,638 
42,530 
49,592 
65,381 
59,335 
55,570 
65,949 
62,923 
65,379 


-Thousand pounds- 






(3) 
(3) 
10,310 
15,274 
21,485 
20,332 
20,354 
31,646 
35,587 
39,919 


115,765 

121,281 
85,146 
95,335 

107,233 
94,844 
91,729 

100,719 
93,742 
97,101 


115,765 
121,281 
95,456 
110,609 
128,718 
115,176 
112,083 
132,365 
129,329 
137,020 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 



(1) Only imports from Canada and St. Pierre and Miquelon are considered American lobst 
were converted to round (live) by using these conversion factors: 1.00, Whole; 4.50, me 
and 4.64, canned. (2) Domestic exports converted to live weight by 1.00, whole; 4.00, 
and 4.50, canned. Foreign exports converted using import factors. (3) Not reported. 



er and 
at; 
meat; 




U.S. SUPPLY OF SPINY L0BSTERS,1 987-96 
(Round weight) 



U.S. commercial 
landings 



Imports 
(1) 



Exports 
(2) 



Total 
supply 



1987. 
1988. 
1989. 
1990. 
1991. 
1992. 
1993. 
1994. 
1995. 
1995. 



5,755 
7,166 
8,125 
7,120 
7,096 
4,872 
6,076 
8,104 
7,123 
8,308 



145,706 
132,071 
87,793 
88,426 
81,332 
77,848 
70,884 
68,787 
86,900 
75,595 



■Thousand pounds- 



151,461 
139,237 
95,918 
95,546 
88,428 
82,720 
75,960 
76,891 
94,023 
83,903 



(3) 
(3) 
6,373 
6,948 
3,388 
2,001 
1,306 
1,304 
5,035 
3,033 



151,461 
139,237 
89,545 
88,598 
85,040 
80,719 
75,654 
75,587 
88,988 
80,870 



(1) Imports were converted to round (live) weight by using these conversion factors: 1.00, 
whole; 3.00, tails; 4.35, other; and 4.50 canned. (2) Domestic exports converted to round 
weight by using: 1.00, whole; 3.00, tails, 4.00, other; 4.50, canned. Foreign exports converted 
using import factors. (3) Not reported. 



120 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



U.S. SUPPLY OF CLAMS, 1987-96 
(Meat weight) 



Year 


U.S. commercial 
landinqs (1) 


Imports 
(2) 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1987 

1988 

1989 

1990 

1991 

1992 

1993 

1994 

1995 

1996 




-Thousand pounds- 


1 


134,357 
131,740 
138,166 
139,198 
134,243 
142,449 
147,752 
131,427 
134,224 
123,239 


17,641 
14,872 
13,254 
15,830 
12,291 
14,262 
9,579 
•15,507 
12,645 
14,340 


151,998 
146,612 
151,420 
155,028 
146,534 
156,711 
157,331 
146,934 
146,869 
137,579 


1,157 
1,458 
1,863 
2,961 
2,948 
1,662 
1,809 
2,617 
2,853 
3,448 


150,841 
145,154 
149,557 
152,067 
143,586 
155,049 
155,522 
144,317 
144,016 
134,131 



(1) For specific breakout see table on page 1. 

(2) Imports and exports were converted to meat weight by using these conversion factors: 0.40, 
shell or shucked; 0.30, canned chowder and juice; and 0.93, other. 

U.S. SUPPLY OF OYSTERS, 1987-96 
(Meat weight) 



Year 


U.S. commercial 
landinqs 


Imports 
(1) 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1987 

1988 

1989 

1990 

1991 

1992 

1993 

1994 

1995 

1996 




-Thousand pounds- 


1 


39,807 
31,892 
29,250 
29,193 
31,859 
36,156 
33,575 
38,086 
40,380 
38,007 


52,085 
46,414 
37,662 
27,546 
30,547 
26,529 
28,244 
24,694 
24,200 
21,708 


91,892 
78,306 
66,912 
56,739 
62,406 
62,685 
61,819 
62,780 
64,580 
59,715 


(2) 

(2) 

1,090 
1,004 
739 
797 
1,131 
1,988 
1,908 
1,648 


91,892 
78,306 
65,822 
55,735 
61,667 
61,888 
60,688 
60,792 
62,672 
58,067 



(1) Imports and exports were converted to meat weight by using these conversion factors: 
0.93, canned; 3.12, canned smoked; and 0.75, other. (2) Not reported. 



U.S. SUPPLY OF SCALLOPS, 1987-96 
(Meat weight) 



Year 


U.S. commercial 
landinqs (1) 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1987 

1988 

1989 

1990 

1991 

1992 

1993 

1994 

1995 

1996 




-Thousand pounds- 


1 


40,773 
42,994 
40,611 
41,591 
39,740 
33,884 
18,638 
25,469 
19,526 
18,197 


39,934 
32,039 
40,874 
39,839 
29,528 
38,682 
51,973 
56,676 
48,331 
58,686 


80,707 
75,033 
81,485 
81,430 
69,268 
72,566 
70,611 
82, 145 
67,857 
76,883 


1,343 
1,369 
2,498 
7,099 
7,083 
3,589 
4,147 
5,990 
5,926 
6,191 


79,364 
73,664 
78,987 
74,331 
62,185 
68,977 
66,464 
76,155 
61,931 
70,692 



breakout see table on page 1. 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



121 



U.S. SUPPLY OF ALL FORMS OF SHRIMP, 1987-96 
(Heads-olf weight) 



Year 


U.S. commercial 
landinqs (1) 


Imports 
(2) 


Total 


Exports 
(3) 


Total 
supply 


1987 


223,514 
203,350 
215,825 
213,899 
198,115 
207,086 
180,687 
174,969 
190,208 
195,902 


583,030 
598,210 
563,523 
579,427 
632,775 
694,254 
708,683 
749,993 
719,463 
720,852 


-Thousand pounds- 

806,544 
801,560 
779,348 
793,326 
830,890 
901,340 
889,370 
924,962 
909,671 
916,754 


33,813 
34,784 
36,056 
59,683 
87,186 
81,604 
81,447 
77,755 
77,677 
72,190 


772,731 
766,776 
743,292 
733,643 
743,704 
819,736 
807,923 
847,207 
831,994 
844,564 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 



(1) Commercial landings were converted to heads-off weight by using these conversion factors: 
South Atlantic and Gulf, 0.629; and New England, Pacific and other, 0.57. 



(2) Imports were converted to heads-off weight by using these conversion factors: 
shell-on, 1.00; peeled raw, 1.28; canned, 2.52; and other, 2.40. 



breaded, 0.63; 



(3) Exports were converted to heads-off weight by using these conversion factors: domestic- 
and frozen, 1.18; canned, 2.02; other, 2.40; foreign — fresh and frozen, 1.00; canned, 2.52; 
and other, 2.40. 




U.S. SUPPLY OF CANNED SHRIMP, 1987-96 
(Canned weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
pack 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1987 




4,382 
4,476 
2,623 
710 
632 
640 
658 
463 
912 
819 


17,132 
14,138 
11,315 
9,735 
9,361 
9,273 
8, 170 
6,314 
6,570 
3,563 


21,514 

18,614 

13,938 

10,445 

9,993 

9,913 

8,828 

6,777 

7,482 

4,382 


2,419 
2,187 
2,128 
2,670 
2,352 
1,931 
2,557 
1,841 
3,250 
2,665 


19,095 
16,427 
11,810 
7,775 
7,641 
7,982 
6,271 
4,936 
4,232 
1,717 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 



122 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



U.S. SUPPLY OF FISH MEAL AND SOLUBLES, 1987-96 
(Product weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
production (1) 


Imports 
(2) 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1987 


911,622 
755,520 
734,736 
670,328 
697,520 
691,016 
814,196 
880,852 
711,996 
679,472 


393,730 
265,310 
171, 112 
239,426 
158,916 
150,911 
760,664 
548,288 
139, 101 
135,561 


-Thousand pounds- 

1,305,352 

1,020,830 

905,848 

909,754 

856,436 

841,927 

1,574,860 

1,429,140 

851,097 

815,033 


104,086 
153,946 
107,350 
141,888 
206,320 
258,511 
212,859 
159,937 
176,981 
186,412 


1,201,266 
866,884 
798,498 
767,866 
650,116 
583,416 
1,362,001 
1,269,203 
674,116 
628,621 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 



(1) Includes shellfish meal production plus the production of U.S. solubles. (2) 
include imports of fish solubles. 



Data do not 



Note: — Wet weight of solubles has been converted to dry weight by reducing its poundage by 
one-half. 



U.S. SUPPLY OF FISH MEAL, 1987-96 
(Product weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
production (1) 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1987 




-Thousand pounds- 


1 


786,978 
643,796 
618,382 
577,498 
612,716 
644,512 
750,744 
807,833 
667,240 
638,500 


393,730 
265,310 
171,112 
239,426 
158,916 
150,911 
760,664 
548,288 
139,101 
135,561 


1, 180,708 
909,106 
789,494 
816,924 
771,632 
795,423 
1,511,408 
1,356,121 
806,341 
774,061 


104,086 
153,946 
107,350 
141,888 
206,320 
258,511 
212,859 
159,937 
176,981 
186,412 


1,076,622 
755,160 
682,144 
675,036 
565,312 
536,912 
1,298,549 
1,196,184 
629,360 
587,649 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 



lellfish meal. 



U.S. SUPPLY OF FISH OILS, 1987-96 



Year 


U.S. 
production 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1987 




1 








298,496 
224,733 
225,478 
281,949 
267,345 
184,725 
293,452 
291, 189 
241,941 
248,399 


25,697 
27,667 
25,449 
36,702 
21,828 
23,772 
26,052 
40,642 
23,913 
35,622 


324,193 
252,400 
250,927 
318,651 
289,173 
208,497 
319,504 
331,831 
265,854 
284,021 


249,246 
150,002 
198,009 
236,589 
254,525 
177,444 
184,488 
242,788 
260,394 
187,294 


74,947 

102,398 

52,918 

82,062 

34,648 

31,053 

135,016 

89,043 

5,460 

96,727 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



123 



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198 






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124 



PER CAPITA 



U.S. CONSUMPTION 

Annual per capita consumption of seafood products represents the pounds of edible meat 
consumed from domestically-caught and imported fish and shellfish adjusted for beginning and 
ending inventories, and exports, divided by the civilian population of the United States as of 
July 1 of each year. 



U.S. ANNUAL PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION OF COMMERCIAL FISH AND SHELLFISH, 1909-96 



Year 


Civilian 

resident 

population 

July 1 (1) 


Per capita consumption 


Fresh and 
frozen (2) 


Canned 
(3) 


Cured 
(4) 


Total 


1909 (5) 

1910 


Mi 1 1 ion 
persons 

90.5 

92.2 

93.9 

95.3 

97.2 

99.1 

100.5 

102.0 

103.3 

103.2 

104.5 

106.5 
108.5 
110.0 
111.9 
114.1 
115.8 
117.4 
119.0 
120.5 
121.8 

122.9 
123.9 
124.7 
125.4 
126.2 
127.1 
127.9 
128.6 
129.6 
130.7 

132.1 
132.1 
131.4 
128.0 
127.2 
128.1 
138.9 
143.1 
145.7 
148.2 

150.8 
151.6 
153.9 
156.6 
159.7 
163.0 
166.1 
169.1 
172.2 
175.3 


4.3 

4.5 
4.8 
5.0 
5.3 
5.6 
5.8 
6.0 
6.2 
6.4 
6.4 

6.3 
6.2 
6.1 
6.0 
6.1 
6.3 
6.6 
7.0 
7.1 
6.9 

5.8 
4.9 
4.3 
4.2 
4.3 
5.1 
5.2 
5.6 
5.2 
5.3 

5.7 
6.3 
5.2 
5.5 
5.5 
6.6 
5.9 
5.8 
6.0 
5.8 

6.3 
6.3 
6.2 
6.4 
6.2 
5.9 
5.7 
5.5 
5.7 
5.9 


- - -Pounds, ed 

2.7 

2.8 
2.8 
2.9 
2.9 
3 
2.4 
2.2 
2.0 
2.0 
2.8 

3.2 
2.2 
3.2 
2.9 
3.2 
3.2 
3.4 
3.9 
3.9 
3.9 

3.4 
3.2 
3.4 
3.9 
4.2 
4.7 
*5.8 
5.3 
4.8 
4.7 

4.6 
4.2 
2.9 
1.8 
2.6 
2.6 
4.2 
3.8 
4.4 
4.5 

4.9 
4.3 
4.3 
4.3 
4.3 
3.9 
4.0 
4.0 
4.3 
4 4 


Lble meat- - - - 

*4.0 

3.9 
3.7 
3.4 
3.3 
3.1 
3.0 
2.8 
2.7 
2.5 
2.4 

2.3 

2.1 
2.0 
1.8 
1.7 
1.6 
1.4 
1.3 
1.1 
1.1 

1.0 
0.7 
0.7 
0.6 
0.7 
0.7 
0.7 
0.9 
0.8 
0.7 

0.7 
0.7 
0.6 
0.6 
0.6 
0.7 
0.7 
0.7 
0.7 
0.6 

0.6 
0.6 
0.7 
0.7 
0.7 
0.7 
0.7 
0.7 
0.6 
0.6 


11.0 

11.2 
11.3 
11.3 
11.5 
8.7 
11.2 
11.0 
10.9 
10.9 
11.6 

11.8 
10.5 
11.3 
10.7 
11.0 
11.1 
11.4 
12.2 
12.1 
11.9 

10.2 

8.8 

8.4 

8.7 

9.2 

10.5 

11.7 

11.8 

10.8 

10.7 

11.0 

11.2 

8.7 

7.9 

8.7 

9.9 

10.8 

10.3 

11.1 

10.9 

11.8 
11.2 
11.2 
11.4 
11.2 
10.5 
10.4 
10.2 
10.6 
10.9 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


192 9 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1937 


1938 


1939 


1940 


1941 


1942 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 









See notes at end of table. 



(Continued) 



PER CAPITA 



125 



U.S. CONSUMPTION 
U.S. ANNUAL PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION OF COMMERCIAL FISH AND SHELLFISH, 1909-96 - Continued 



civilian 


Per capita consumpt 


ion 




resident 










population 


Fresh and 


Canned 


Cured 


Total 


July 1 (1) 


frozen (2) 


(3) 


(4) 




Mi 1 1 ion 










persons 




- - -Pounds, edible meat- - - - 


- 


178.1 


5.7 


4.0 


0.6 


10.3 


181.1 


5.9 


4.3 


0.5 


10.7 


183.7 


5.8 


4.3 


0.5 


10.6 


186.5 


5.8 


4.4 


0.5 


10.7 


189.1 


5.9 


4.1 


0.5 


10.5 


191.6 


6.0 


4.3 


0.5 


10.8 


193.4 


6.1 


4.3 


0.5 


10.9 


195.3 


5.8 


4.3 


0.5 


10.6 


197.1 


6.2 


4.3 


0.5 


11.0 


199.1 


6.6 


4.2 


0.4 


11.2 


201.9 


6.9 


4.5 


0.4 


11.8 


204.9 


6.7 


4.3 


0.5 


11.5 


207.5 


7.1 


4.9 


0.5 


12.5 


209.6 


7.4 


5.0 


0.4 


12.8 


211.6 


6.9 


4.7 


0.5 


12.1 


213.8 


7.5 


4.3 


0.4 


12.2 


215.9 


8.2 


4.2 


0.5 


12.9 


218.1 


7.7 


4.6 


0.4 


12.7 


220.5 


8.1 


5.0 


0.3 


13.4 


223.0 


7.8 


4.8 


0.4 


13.0 


225.6 


7.9 


4.3 


0.3 


12.5 


227.8 


7.8 


4.6 


0.3 


12.7 


230.0 


7.9 


4.3 


0.3 


12.5 


232.1 


8.4 


4.7 


0.3 


13.4 


234.1 


9.0 


4.9 


0.3 


14.2 


236.2 


9.8 


5.0 


0.3 


15.1 


238.4 


9.8 


5.4 


0.3 


15.5 


240.6 


*10.7 


5.2 


0.3 


*16.2 


242.8 


10.0 


4.9 


0.3 


15.2 


245.1 


10.2 


5.1 


0.3 


15.6 


247.8 


9.6 


5.1 


0.3 


15.0 


250.5 


9.7 


4.9 


0.3 


14.9 


253.5 


9.9 


4.6 


0.3 


14.8 


256.4 


10.2 


4.5 


0.3 


15.0 


259.2 


10.4 


4.5 


0.3 


15.2 


261.4 


10.0 


4.7 


0.3 


15.0 


264.0 


10.0 


4.5 


0.3 


14.8 



1960. 

1961. 
1962. 
1963. 
1964. 
1965. 
1966. 
1967. 
1968. 
1969. 

1970. 

1971. 
1972. 
1973. 
1974. 
1975. 
1976. 
1977. 
1978. 
1979. 

1980. 

1981. 
1982. 
1983. 
1984. 
1985. 
1986. 
1987. 
1988. 
1989. 

1990. 

1991. 
1992. 
1993. 
1994. 
1995. 
1996. 



(1) 



Resident population for 1909 to 1929 and civilian resident population for 1930 to date. 



(2) Fresh and frozen fish consumption from 1910 to 1928 is estimated. Beginning in 1973, data 
include consumption of artificially cultivated catfish. Domestic landings used in calculating 
consumption are preliminary after 1977. 

(3) Canned fish consumption for 1911 to 1920 is estimated. Beginning in 1921, it is based on 
production reports, packer stocks, and foreign trade statistics for individual years. 

(4) Cured fish consumption for 1910 to 1928 is estimated. 

(5) Data for 1909 estimate based on the 1908 census and foreign trade data. 



^Record. 



126 



PER CAPITA 



U.S. CONSUMPTION 



U.S. ANNUAL PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION OF CANNED FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1976-96 



Year 


Salmon 


Sardines 


Tuna 1 Shellfish 


Other 


Total 








Pounds 






1976. .. 


0.3 


0.3 


2.8 


0.4 


0.4 


4.2 


1977. . . 


0.5 


0.3 


2.8 


0.6 


0.4 


4.6 


1978. . . 


0.6 


0.3 


3.3 


0.5 


0.3 


5.0 


1979. . . 


0.5 


0.3 


3.2 


0.5 


0.3 


4.8 


1980. . . 


0.5 


0.3 


3.0 


0.4 


0.1 


4.3 


1981.. . 


0.5 


0.4 


3.0 


0.4 


0.3 


4.6 


1982. . . 


0.5 


0.3 


2.8 


0.4 


0.3 


4.3 


1983. .. 


0.5 


0.2 


3.2 


0.4 


0.4 


4.7 


1984. . . 


0.6 


0.2 


3.2 


0.4 


0.5 


4.9 


1985. . . 


0.5 


0.3 


3.3 


0.5 


0.4 


5.0 


1986.. . 


0.5 


0.3 


3.6 


0.5 


0.5 


5.4 


1987. . . 


0.4 


0.3 


3.5 


0.5 


0.5 


5.2 


1988. . . 


0.3 


0.3 


3.6 


0.4 


0.3 


4.9 


1989. .. 


0.3 


0.3 


3.9 


0.4 


0.2 


5.1 


1990. . . 


0.4 


0.3 


3.7 


0.3 


0.4 


5.1 


1991. . . 


0.5 


0.2 


3.6 


0.4 


0.2 


4.9 


1992.. . 


0.5 


0.2 


3.5 


0.3 


0.1 


4.6 


1993. . . 


0.4 


0.2 


3.5 


0.3 


0.1 


4.5 


1994. . . 


0.4 


0.2 


3.3 


0.3 


0.3 


4.5 


1995. . . 


0.5 


0.2 


3.4 


0.3 


0.3 


4.7 


1996. . . 


0.5 


0.2 


3.2 


0.3 


0.3 


4.5 



NOTE: — Domestic landings data used in calculating these data are preliminary after 1977. 



U.S. ANNUAL PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION OF CERTAIN FISHERY ITEMS, 1976-96 





Fillets 


Sticks 




Shrimp 




Year 


and 


and 




all 






steaks (1) 


portions 




preparation 






















1976. . . 


2.5 




2.0 




1.5 


1977... 


2.5 




2.0 




1.6 


1978. . . 


2.7 




2.2 




1.5 


1979. . . 


2.7 




*2.2 




1.3 


1980. . . 


2.4 




2.0 




1.4i 


1981. .. 


2.4 




1.8 




1.5j 


1982. . . 


2.5 




1.7 




1.5 


1983.. . 


2.7 




1.8 




i.t| 


1984. . . 


3.0 




1.8 




1.9 


1985. . . 


3.2 




1.8 




2.0 


1986. . . 


3.4 




1.8 




2.2 


1987... 


*3.6 




1.7 




2.4 


1988... 


3.2 




1.5 




2.4; 


1989.. . 


3.1 




1.5 




2.3 


1990. . . 


3.1 




1.5 




2.2 


1991. . . 


3.0 




1.2 




2.4 


1992. .. 


2.9 




0.9 




2.5 


1993. . . 


2.9 




1.0 




2.5 


1994. . . 


3.1 




0.9 




*2.6 


1995. . . 


2.9 




1.2 




2.5 


1996.. . 


3.0 




1.0 




2.5 



(1) Data 
be made i 

(2) Produ 
*Record 



include groundfish and other 
to blocks from which sticks 
ct weight of fillets and stea 



species. Data do not include blocks, but fillets could 

nd portions could be produced. 

ks and sticks and portions, edible (meat) weight of shrimp. 



Note: — Domestic landings data used in calculating these data are preliminary after 1977, 



PER CAPITA 

U.S. USE 



127 



Per capita use of commercial fish and shellfish is based on the supply of fishery products, 
both edible and nonedible (industrial), on a round weight equivalent basis, without considering 
beginning or ending stocks, defense purchases, or exports. 

Per capita use figures are not comparable with per capita consumption data. Per capita 
consumption figures represent edible (for human use) meat weight consumption rather than round 
weight consumption. In addition, per capita consumption includes allowances for beginning and 
ending stocks and exports, whereas the use does not include such allowances. 

Per capita use is derived by using total population including U.S. Armed Forces overseas. 
The per capita consumption is derived by using civilian resident population. 



U.S ANNUAL PER CAPITA USE OF COMMERCIAL FISH AND SHELLFISH, 1960-96 (1) 



Total population 

including armed 

forces overseas 

July 1 



U.S. 
supply 



Commercial 
landings 



Imports 



1960. 

1961. 
1962. 
1963. 
1964. 
1965. 
1966. 
1967. 
1968. 
1969. 

1970. 

1971. 
1972. 
1973. 
1974. 
1975. 
1976. 
1977. 
1978. 
1979. 

1980. 

1981. 
1982. 
1983. 
1984. 
1985. 
1986. 
1987. 
1988. 
1989. 

1990. 

1991. 
1992. 
1993. 
1994. 
1995. 
1996. 



Million 
persons 



180, 
183. 
186, 
189, 
191, 
194, 
196, 
198, 
200, 
202 



205.1 



207.7 
209.9 
211.9 
213.9 
216.0 
218.0 
220.2 
222.6 
225.1 

227.7 
230.0 
232.2 



234.3 
236.3 
238.5 
240.7 
242.8 
245.0 
247.3 



249.9 
252.7 
255.5 
258.2 
260.7 
263.0 
265.3 



Mi 1 1 ion 
pounds 

8,223 

9,570 
10,408 
11,434 
12,031 
10,535 
12,469 
13, 991 
17,381 
11,847 

11,474 
11,804 
13,849 
10,378 
9,875 
10, 164 
11,593 
10,652 
11,509 
11,831 

11,357 
11,353 
12,011 
12,352 
12,552 
15, 150 
14,368 
15,744 
14,628 
15,485 

16,349 
16,363 
16, 106 
20, 334 
19,309 
16.-484 
16,474 



28.7 
25.6 



23. 
24, 
22. 
20. 
20. 
21. 



24.0 
24.1 
22.9 
22.9 
23.2 
22.6 
24.7 
23.9 
27.1 
27.9 

28.5 

26.0 

27.4 

27, 

27. 

26. 

25. 

28. 

29. 

34, 



37. 
37. 
37. 
40. 
40. 
37. 
36. 



18.2 
23.9 

27.1 
34.8 
39.0 
29.6 
41.2 
50.0 
65.9 
37.0 



31.9 
32.7 
43.1 
26.1 
23.0 
24.5 
28.5 
24.4 
24.6 
24.7 



21.4 
23.4 
24.3 
25.2 
25.8 
37.3 
34.6 
36.4 
30.4 
28.4 



27.8 
27.3 
25.3 
38.2 
34.0 
25.5 
26.0 



45.5 

52.1 

55.8 

60, 

62, 

54, 

63, 

70, 

86, 



4 
7 
2 
4 
4 
6 
58.4 

55.9 
56.8 
66.0 
49.0 



46. 
47. 
53. 
48. 
51. 
52. 

49. 
49. 
51. 
52, 
53, 
63, 
59, 
64, 
59, 
62, 



65.4 
64.8 
63.0 
78.8 
74.1 
62.7 
62.1 



(1) Data include U.S. commercial landings and imports of both edible and nonedible (industrial) 
fishery products on a round weight basis. "Total supply" is not adjusted for beginning and 
ending stocks, defense purchases, or exports. 



128 



PER CAPITA 



WORLD CONSUMPTION 



ANNUAL PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION OF FISH AND SHELLFISH FOR HUMAN FOOD, 
BY REGION AND COUNTRY, 1991-93 AVERAGE 



Region 

and 

Country 



Estimated live weight 
equivalent 



Kilograms 



Region 

and 
Country 



Estimated live weight 
equivalent 



Kilograms 



North Aaarlca: 

Canada 

Greenland 

St. Pierre and 

Miquelon 

United States 

Caribbean: 

Anguilla 

Antigua 

Aruba 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

British Virgin Islands 

Cayman Islands 

Cuba 

Dominica 

Dominican Republic. . . . 

Grenada 

Guadeloupe 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Martinique 

Montserrat 

Netherland Antilles... 
St. Christopher-Nevis. 

Saint Lucia 

St. Vincent 

Trinidad-Tobago 

Turks & Caicos 



Latin Jttaarlca: 

Argentina .... 

Belize 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Costa Rica. . . 

Ecuador 

El Salvador. . 
French Guiana 
Guatemala. . . . 

Guyana 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Nicaragua . . . . 

Panama 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Suriname 

Uruguay 

Venezuela . . . . 

Baropa: 

Albania 

Armenia 

Austria 

Azerbaijan . . . 



23.0 
82.3 



57.4 
21.8 



48.1 
63.1 
30.9 
24.9 
25.8 
36.5 
79.5 
32.1 
11.8 
25.3 

8.2 
39.0 
42.2 

2.6 
15.9 
50.8 

9.9 
20.3 
50.8 
20.9 
17.2 
11.5 
40.2 



7.4 
7.2 
1.1 
5.7 

29.8 
3.1 
5.1 
7.2 
2.4 

35.8 
0.8 

43.7 
1.1 

11.7 
1.3 

16.0 
3.7 

18.5 

20.6 
6.3 

14.9 



0.7 
1.3 
9.8 
5.2 



50, 
181, 



126.5 
48.1 



106.0 

139.1 
68.1 
54.9 
56.9 
80.5 

175.3 
70.8 
26.0 
55.8 
18.1 
86.0 
93.0 
5.7 
35.1 

112.0 
21.8 
44.8 

112.0 
46.1 
37.9 
25.4 



16 
15 

2 
12 
65 

6 
11 
15 

5 
78.9 

1.8 
96.3 

2.4 
25.8 

2.9 
35.3 



1.5 
2.9 

21.6 

11.5 



Airopa - Continuad: 



Belarus 

Belgium and Luxembourg. 

Bosnia-Hercegovina 

Bulgaria 

Croatia 

Czech Republic 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Faeroe Island 

Finland 

France , 

Georgia , 

Germany , 

Greece , 

Hungary , 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Kazakhstan 

Kyrgyzstan 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Macedonia 

Malta 

Moldova 

Monaco 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Romania 

Russian Federation.... 

Slovakia 

Slovenia 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Tajikistan 

Turkmenistan 

Ukraine 

United Kingdom 

Uzbekistan 

Yugoslavia 



lf»ar Eaat: 

Afghanistan 

Bahrain 

Cyprus 

Egypt 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Jordan 

Kuwait 

Lebanon 

Libya 

Oman 

Qatar 

Saudi Arabia 

Sudan 

Syria 

Turkey 

United Arab Emirates 
Yemen Republic 



1.4 
18.6 





2 

1 

1 
20 
43 
86 
32 
29.0 

8.4 
12.5 
22.5 

4.0 
91.8 
15.1 
22.1 

4.1 

0.2 
34.9 



33.0 

2.1 

23.8 

1 



38.0 

26.8 

13.4 



10 



H 




17 
17 

7 

5 

1 
20 

3 

7 



4 
23 
19.9 

5.9 

1.4 

0.5 

6.7 
24.8 

6.7 



See note at end of table. 



(Continued on next page) 



PER CAPITA 



129 



WORLD CONSUMPTION 



ANNUAL PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION OF FISH AND SHELLFISH FOR HUMAN FOOD, 
BY REGION AND COUNTRY, 1991-93 AVERAGE 



Region 

and 
Country 



Estimated live weight 
equivalent 



Kilograms 



Region 

and 
Country 



Estimated live weight 
equivalent 



Kilograms 



Bangladesh. 

Brunei 

Burma 

Cambodia. . . 

China 

Hon^ Kong. . 

India 

Indonesia. . 

Japan 

Laos 

Macao 

Maldives . . . 
Malaysia . . . 
Mongolia. . . 

Nepal 

North Korea 
Pakistan . . . 
Philippines 
Singapore . . 
South Korea 
Sri Lanka . . 

Taiwan 

Thailand. . . 
Vietnam. . . . 



Africa: 

Algeria 

Angola 

Benin 

Botswana 

Burkina 

Burundi 

Cameroon 

Cape Verde 

Central African Rep 

Chad 

Comoros 

Congo 

Djibouti 

Equatorial Guinea.. 

Eritrea 

Ethiopia 

Gabon 

Gambia 

Ghana 

Guinea 

Guinea-Bissau 

Ivory Coast 

Kenya 

Lesotho 

Liberia 



8.2 
21.8 
15.6 
12.0 
12.4 
58.8 

4.0 
15.6 
67.0 

6.7 

39.4 

125.8 

29.5 

0.8 

0.8 
43.2 

2.1 
36.1 
36.8 
47.7 
16.2 
37.0 
25.4 
13.4 



18.1 
4.6 
5.8 

14.7 

32.6 
1.6 

22.9 
0.1 



0.1 



30.3 

20.2 

24.7 

7.7 

4.7 

13.7 

5.9 

0.1 

4.9 



18. 
48. 
34. 
26. 
27. 
129. 



34.4 
147.7 

14.8 

86.9 
277.3 

60.6 
1.8 
1.8 

95.2 
4.6 

79.6 



il.l 



105.2 
35.7 
81.6 
56.0 
29.5 



7.5 
26.0 
23.8 
17.6 

3.1 



19, 



39.9 

10.1 

12.8 

32.4 

71.9 

3.5 

50.5 

0.2 

0.2 

66.8 



44, 
54. 



17.0 
10.4 
30.2 
13.0 
0.2 
10.8 



Africa - ContlnuBd: 



Madagascar . . 

Malawi 

Mali 

Mauritania. . 
Mauritius . . . 

Morocco 

Mozambique . . 

Namibia 

Niger 

Nigeria 

Reunion 

Rwanda 

Sao Tome .... 

Senegal 

Seychelles . . 
Sierra Leone 

Somalia 

South Africa 
St. Helena.. 
Swaziland. . . 
Tanzania. . . . 

Togo 

Tunisia 

Uganda 

Zaire 

Zambia 

Zimbabwe .... 



Ocoanla : 

Australia 

Fiji 

French Polynesia 

Kiribati 

Marshall 

Micronesia 

Nauru 

Niue 

New Caledonia . . . 

New Zealand 

Palau 

Papua New Guinea 
Solomon Islands. 

Tokelau 

Tonga 

Tuvalu 

Vanuatu 

Wallis & Futuna. 
Western Samoa... 

World 



7.3 
6.4 
7.0 

17.4 

26.0 
7.9 
2.3 

10.8 
0.4 
8.3 

24.7 
0.7 

20.9 

27.0 

71.4 

14 
1 
4 

55 


12 



.7 
.3 
.9 
.3 
.1 
.2 
11.0 
8.8 
11.8 
5.8 
7.9 
2.2 



18, 
36, 
34, 
73, 
4, 
18, 
33, 
61, 
20, 
17 
93, 
21 
32, 
103 
24 
55 
29 



16 
14 
15 
38 
57 
17 

5 
23.8 

0.9 
18.3 
54.5 

1.5 

46.1 

59.5 

157.4 

32.4 

2.9 

10.8 

121.9 

0.2 
26.9 
24.3 
19.4 
26.0 
12.8 
17.4 

4.9 



41 

80 

75 
162 

10 

41 

74 
136.0 

46.1 

39.0 
205.9 

48.3 

71.0 
228.6 

52.9 
123.0 

63.9 

19.0 

90.2 



28.7 



Note: — Data for most countries are tentative. Aquatic plants are included where applicable. 

Source: — Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Yearbook of Fishery 
Statistics, 1994, vol. 78, Rome. 



130 



PRICES 



The Exvessel Price table is an index of cinanges In 
tlie relative ciocl<side value of fish and shellfish sold by 
fishing vessels. The table indexes the average annual 
exvessei value (price per pound) received for each 
species or group to ttie average price per pound 
received for Vne sanne species or group In the base year 
1982. 



The exvessel price for each year was obtained 
by dividing total value for each species or group by its 
total quantity as reported in the U. S. commerciai 
landings tables on pages 1 and 2. The index for each 
species or group w/as obtained by multiplying the current 
anual price by ttie 



total quantity caught in 1982 (the base year). That 
number was ttien divided by the 1982 value to obtain the 
final index: 

(100 X Current price X 1982 quantity) = Index 
1962 Annual Value 



Each index number measures price changes 
from the 1982 reference period when the index equaled 
100. A species of fish ttiat sold for $0.75 a pound in 1986 
and a $1 .00 a pound in 1982 would have an index of 75 
in 1986. In 1996, if ttie price of Vne same species 
increased to $1 .07, the index in 1996 would be 107. 



EXVESSEL PRICE INDEX, 1990-1996 

BASE YEAR 1982 = 100 




1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 

YEAR 



□ Edible finfish 



Edible shellfish m Industrial fish 



PRICES 



131 



INDEXES OF EXVESSEL PRICES FOR FISH AND SHELLHSH, BY YEARS, 1990-96 

(1982=100) 



Species 


1990 (1) 


1991 (1) 


1992 (1) 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


Groundfish, et al: 
















Cod 


79 


106 


105 


105 


92 


77 


76 


Haddock 


220 


227 


219 


277 


287 


277 


239 


Pollock: 
















Atlantic 


223 


255 


297 


299 


365 


412 


311 


Alaska 


151 


149 


194 


194 


212 


161 


160 


Flounders 


112 


97 


60 


61 


80 


96 


91 


Total grouadfisb, at ai . . . 


121 


122 


108 


115 


125 


125 


lis 


159 
97 


175 
86 


91 
86 


115 
63 


171 
86 


173 
126 


199 

137 




Salmon: . . 
















Chinook 


101 


101 


112 


81 


76 


76 


63 


Chum 


109 


73 


112 


95 


58 


66 


36 


Pink 


138 


57 


69 


59 


73 


67 


38 


Sockeye 


140 


88 


136 


80 


101 


ICO 


94 


Coho 

Total salmon 

Swordf ish 


105 


72 


84 


74 


76 


54 


48 


125 


82 


113 


78 


as 


82 


69 


108 


102 


111 


92 


107 


104 


103 


Tuna: 


















127 


114 


147 


132 


125 


120 


130 


Bluefin 


572 


1,158 


477 


766 


666 


954 


229 


Skipjack 


85 


83 


72 


85 


127 


83 


82 


Yellowfin 


112 


116 


96 


112 


205 


283 


113 


Total tuna 


112 


126 


97 


117 


ISl 


212 


105 


Total adibla flnfisb 

Clams: 


120 


106 


106 


97 


122 


190 


'»<?. 
















Hard 


127 


142 


135 


113 


105 


113 


148 


Ocean quahog 


111 


124 


124 


128 


129 


136 


142 


Soft 


213 


192 


222 


233 


248 


250 


205 


Surf 


86 


84 


83 


88 


118 


118 


115 


Total clams 

Crabs: 


127 


132 


133 


126 


133 


138 


147 
















Blue 


152 


131 


183 


201 


260 


284 


266 




162 


159 


124 


95 


145 


176 


143 


King 


145 


99 


139 


127 


146 


104 


100 


Snow 


83 


53 


60 


78 


144 


237 


130 


Total crabs 


131 


99 


124 


123 


166 


182 


144 


110 
228 


113 
219 


125 
225 


117 
183 


128 
175 


141 
179 


147 
214 




Scallops: 
















Bay 


149 


157 


150 


161 


49 


55 


69 


Calico 


110 


(2) 


(2) 


(2) 

159 


94 






Sea 


105 


110 


132 


138 


138 


153 


Total scallops 

Shrimp: 


109 


135 


lis 


141 


126 


131 


129 
















Gulf and South Atlantic... 


79 


87 


86 


80 


110 


99 


88 


Other 


113 


130 


113 


128 


142 


179 


148 


Total shrimp 

Total adibla sballfisb 

Total adibla fisb 


81 


89 


88 


92 


lU 


103 


91 


111 


110 


115 


110 


138 


135 


124 
















and sballfisb 


115 


108 


ill 


104 


131 


133 


111 
















Menhaden 


128 


103 


128 


128 


154 


128 


128 


116 


lOS 


■ ■ 112 


105 


132 


132 


112 





(1) Revised. 

(2) Confidential data. 



132 



VALUE ADDED 



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CL *^ u 



EMPLOYMENT, CRAFT, AND PLANTS 



133 



ESTIMATED NUMBER OF COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS (1) 
AND FISHING BOATS (2) BY REGION AND STATE, 1994-1995 



1994 



1995 



Northeast Fisheries: 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Maine 

Maryland (3) 

Massachusetts . . . , 
New Hampshire. . . , 

New Jersey , 

New York (4) . . . . 
Rhode Island. ... 
Virginia (3) .... 



South Atlantic 
and Gulf Fisheries: 
North Carolina... 
South Carolina... 

Georgia 

Florida 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana , 

Texas , 



West Coast Fisheries: 

Washington 

Oregon 

Alaska 

California 

Hawaii 



Great Lakes 

Fisheries: (5) 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

New York 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania. , 
Wisconsin . . . . . 



133 

29 

1,818 

36 

820 

139 

397 

696 

280 

133 



1,024 
571 
312 

2,340 
426 
535 

2,846 

2,200 



1,349 

911 

7,387 

6,247 

3,110 



470 

423 

5,477 

4,500 
396 
1,382 
2,905 
2,888 



9,921 
832 
652 

8,439 

644 

934 

12,954 

2,378 



748 

449 

9, 145 

NA 

NA 



603 

452 

7,295 

36 

5,320 

535 
1,779 
3,601 
3,168 

133 



10, 945 

1,403 

964 

10,779 
1,070 
1,469 

15,800 
4,578 



2,097 
1,360 
16,532 
6,247 
3, 110 



135 

29 

18 

50 

7 

138 



149 

32 

1,798 

33 

805 

139 

423 

698 

291 

122 



1,034 
530 
305 

2,311 
378 
438 

2,805 

1,902 



1,176 
927 
7,141 
5,968 
3,470 



392 

555 
5,439 

4,490 
467 
1,282 
2,924 
2,863 
2,138 



9, 


361 


1, 


022 


NA 




8 


919 




720 




874 


12 


969 


1 


969 




630 




378 


9 


373 


NA 




NA 





(1) Vessels are documented craft greater than 5 net registered tons. 

(2) Boats are craft less than 5 net registered tons. 

(3) Only Federal collected data are available. Inshore data not available. 

(4) Includes vessels and boats in the Great Lakes. 

(5) Commercial fishing fleet sizes for the Great Lakes states represent only the number of 

licenses issued by the state; therefore, may not be an accurate total. Tribal data 
are not included in this table. 
NA — Data not available separately. 



134 



EMPLOYMENT, CRAFT, AND PLANTS 







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135 



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136 



FISHERY PRODUCTS INSPECTION 



FISHERY PRODUCTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS INSPECTED IN CALENDAR YEAR, 1996 









Edible 


fishery products 






Establis 


hment 










Region 


(1) 






Amount inspected 






SIFE 


In- 


Grade 


PUFI No 


Lot 


Total 






Plant 


A 


Mark 








(2) 


(3) 


(4) 


(4) (5) 


(6) 






-Average n 


umber- 




Thousand pounds — 






Northeast 





116 


30,378 


171,766 62,042 


79,272 


343,549 


Southeast 





133 


18,262 


98,940 42,717 


93,878 


253,797 


West 


16 


70 


23,631 


329,335 80,856 


170,191 


604,012 


Total, 1996. 
Total, 1995. 


1€ 


319 


72. 271 


680. 041 135. 615 


343. 340 


1.201.268 


12 


312 


75, 764 


365, Oil ISB, 428 


383, 680 


1,012.884 



(1) These establishments are inspected under contract and certified as meeting U.S. 
Department of Commerce (USDC) regulations for construction and maintenance of facilities 
and equipment processing techniques, and employment practices. 

(2) Fish processing establishments approved for sanitation under the Sanitary Inspected 
Fish Establishment service (SIFE) . Products are not processed under inspection. 

(3) Sanitarily inspected fish establishments processing fishery products under USDC 
inspection. As of December 1996, 110 of these establishments were in the Hazard Analysis 
Critical Control Point (HACCP) Program. 

(4) Products processed under USDC inspection in inspected establishments and labeled with 
USDC inspection mark as "Processed Under Federal Inspection" (PUFI) and/or "U.S. Grade A." 

(5) Products processed under inspection in inspected establishments but bearing no USDC 
inspection mark. 

(6) Lot inspected and marked products checked for quality and condition at the time of 
examination and located in processing plants, warehouses, cold storage facilities, or 
terminal markets anywhere in the United States. 

Note: — Table may not add due to rounding. 

Source: — NMFS, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, F/SF6. 




INSP96.WK4 



137 



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138 THE MAGNUSON-STEVENS FISHERY CONSERVATION 

AND MANAGEMENT ACT 



The Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation 
and Managennent Act, Public Law 94-265 as amended 
(Magnuson-Stevens Act), provides for the conservation 
and management of fishery resources within ttie U.S. 
Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). It also provides for fishery 
rrranagement authority over continental shelf resources 
and anadroTTKDUs species beyond the EEZ, except when 
they are found within a foreign nation's territorial sea or 
fishery consen/ation zone (or equivalent), to ttie extent 
that such sea or zone Is recognized by the United States. 

The EEZ extends from the seaward boundary of 
each of the coastal States (generally 3 nautical miles 
from shore for all but two States) to 2CXD nautical miles 
from shore. The seaward boundaries of Texas, Puerto 
l?lco, and the Gulf coast of Florida are 3 marine leagues 
(9 nautical miles). 



GOVERNING INTERNATIONAL FISHERY AGREEMENTS 



Under the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the Secretary 
of State, In cooperation with tine Secretary of 
Commerce, negotiates Governing International Fishery 
Agreements (GIFAs) witii foreign nations requesting to flsh 
wittiin tiie EEZ. After a GIFA Is signed, it Is transmitted by 
flie President to ttie Congress for ratification. 



FOREIGN FISHING PERMITS 



Title 11 of Vne Magnuson-Stevens Act governs 
foreign fishing In tiie EEZ. The process applied to foreign 
fishing has been described In prior issues of tills 
publication. As U.S. fishing capacity grew, foreign 
participation in directed fisheries, as well as In foreign joint 
ventijres In which U.S. vessels delivered U.S. harvested fish 
to permitted foreign vessels In the EEZ diminished until. In 
1991, foreign vessels no longer were permitted to 
conduct any harvesting or processing operations In the 
EEZ. This nnarked the achievement of one of the 
objectives of ttie Magnuson-Stevens Act, tinat is, the 
development of the U.S. fishing industry to take vA^at 
were in 1976 underutilized species, and tine displacement 
of the foreign fishing effort in the EEZ by 1991 . 

As a result of the above, there has been no total 
allowable level of foreign fishing since 1991, aittnough 
35X03 mt of Atiantic mackerel and 40,CXXD mt of Aflantic 



herring were available for Joint venture fishing in 1996. 
However, no Joint venture permits were Issued in 1996 
because no foreign nations elected to participate in Joint 
venture fishing In 1996. NMFS continues to maintain 
certain regulations pertaining to foreign fishing, such as 
the foreign fishing fee schedule, should ttnere be a 
situation In ttie fijtijre In which allowing limited foreign 
fishing In an underutilized fishery would be of advantage 
to tine U.S. fishing industry. 



FMPsqncfPMP? 



Under tine Magnuson-Stevens Act, eight 
Regional Fishery Management Councils are charged witin 
preparing Fishery Management Plans (FMPs) for the 
fisheries needing management wflthin ttneir areas of 
auttnority. After tine Councils prepare FMPs that cover 
domestic and foreign fishing efforts, the FMPs are 
submitted to the Secretary of Commerce (Secretary) for 
approval and ImplementaHon. The Department, through 
NMFS agents and the U.S. Coast Guard, Is responsible for 
enforcing the law and regulations. 



The Secretary is empowered to prepare FMPs In 
the Atiantic and Gulf of Mexico for highly migratory 
species. Where no FMP exists. Preliminary Fishery 
Management Plans (PMPs), which only cover foreign 
fishing efforts, are prepared by tine Secretary for each 
fishery for which a foreign nation requests a permit. The 
Secretary is also empowered to produce an FMP for any 
fishery tinat a Council has not duly produced . In tills latter 
case, tine Secretary's FMP covers domestic and foreign 
fishing. 



As of December 31 , 1996, five Preliminary Fishery 
Management Ptans (PMPs) were in effect, many of whk;h 
have been amended since first being Implemented. 

Foreign Trawl Fisheries of tine Northwest 

Atiantic 
Hake Fisheries of the Northwest 

Atiantic 
Bering Sea/Norttneast Pacific Herring 
Bering Sea Snails 
Atiantic Herring of tine Norflnwestem 

Atiantic 



THE MAGNUSON-STEVENS FISHERY CONSERVATION 
AND MANAGEMENT ACT 



139 



The Atlantic swordflsh, Atlantic shai1<s, and 
Atlantic billflsti fisheries are currently being managed 
by the Secretary under the Magnuson-Stevens Act and 
the Western Atlantic bluefln tuna fishery is managed 
under the Atlantic Tunas Convention Act. 



FISHERY MANA GEMENT PLANS (FMPs^ 



Under section 304 of the Magnuson-Stevens Act, 
all Council-prepared FMPs must be reviewed for approval 
by the Secretary. After FMPs have been approved under 
section 304 of the Magnuson-Stevens Act, they are 
Implemented by Federal regulations, under section 305 
of the Act. As of December 31 , 1996, there are 39 FMF>s 
In place. Of these, three are Secretarial FMPs for Atlantic 
highly migratory species. The 36 FMPs Council prepared 
are listed belov*/. The FMPs are amended by the 
Councils and the amendments are submitted for 
approval under the same Secretarial revlev*/ process as 
new FMPs. Most of the FMPs listed have been amended 
since Initial Implementation. Those marl<ed with a double 
asterisk (**) were amended In 1996. 

Northeast Multlspecles (**) 

American Lobster (**) 

Atlantic Blueflsh 

Atlantic Coast Red Drum 

Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterflsh (") 

Atlantic Salmon 

Atlantic Sea Scallops (**) 

Atlantic Surf Clams and Ocean Quahogs (**) 

Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black Sea Bass (") 

Gulf and South Atlantic Spiny Lobster 

Caribbean Reef Fish 



Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish (") 

Gulf of Mexico Corals 

South Atlantic Corals 

South Atlantic Golden Crab 

Caribbean Coral Reef Resources 

Gulf of Mexico Shrimp 

Gulf of Mexico Stone Crab 

Gulf of Mexico Red Drum 

Coastal Migratory Pelagics 

Caribbean Queen Conch 

Caribbean Spiny Lobster 

Soutti Atlantic Snapper/Grouper 

South Atlantic Shrimp (**) 

Norltiem Anchovy 

King and Tanner Crab 

Commercial and Recreational Salmon 

High Seas Salmon 

Pacific Coast Groundfish 

Gulf of Alaska Groundfish (**) 

Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands 

Groundfish (") 
Alaska Scallops (**) 
Western Pacific Crustaceans (**) 
Western Pacific Precious Corals 
Western Pacific Bottomflsh and Seamount 

Groundfish 
Western Pacific Pelagics 



During 1996, 855 regulatory actions were 
processed via Vne Federal Register to implement FMP 
fisher/ management actions and rules for domestic 
fishing. This number Includes hearings, meetings, and 
correction notices. 




140 



THE MAGNUSON FISHERY CONSERVATION 
AND MANAGEMENT ACT 



REGIONAL FISHERY MANAGEMENT COUNCILS 



Counell 



S&atAB. 



Talaphona 



Director and 

AddEBSfi. 



jOnr SNBIJIND 



(Maine, New Hampshire, 
Massachusetts, Rhode 
Island, and Connecticut) 



617-231-0422 
FAX: 565-8937 



Paul J. Howard 
Suntaug Office Park 
5 Broadway (Rt. 1) 
Saugus, MA 01906 



MZD-AZZJINTXC 



(New York, New Jersey, 
Delaware, Pennsylvania, 
Maryland, Virginia, and 
North Carolina) 



302-674-2331 
FAX: 674-5399 



David R. Keifer 
Federal Bldg., Rm. 2115 
300 South New St. 
Dover, DE 19901 



SOOTB XTLAHTZC 



(North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Georgia 
and Florida) 



803-571-4366 
FAX: 769-4520 



Robert K. Mahood 
1 Southpark Circle 
Suite 306 
Charleston, SC 29407 



GOLF or taxico 



(Texas, Louisiana 
Mississippi, Alabama, 
and Florida) 



813-228-2815 
FAX: 225-7015 



Wayne E. Swingle 
3018 U.S. Highway 301 

North, Suite 1000 
Tampa, FL 33619 



(Virginia Islands and 
the Commonwealth 
of Puerto Rico) 



809-766-5926 
FAX: 766-6239 



Miquel A. Rolon 

268 Ave. Munoz Rivera 

Suite 1108 

San Juan, PR 00918 



(California, Washington, 
Oregon, and Idaho) 



503-326-6352 
FAX: 326-6831 



Lawrence D. Six 
2130 S.W. 5th Ave. 
Suite 224 
Portland, OR 97201 



MORXH PACZrZC 



(Alaska, Washington, 
and Oregon) 



907-271-2809 
FAX: 271-2817 



Clarence G. Pautzke 
605 W. 4th Ave. 
Room 306 
Anchorage, AK 99501 



taSTBOl PACIFIC 



(Hawaii, American 

Samoa, Guam, and the 
Northern Marianas 
Islands) 



808-522-8220 
FAX: 522-8226 



Kitty M. Simonds 
1164 Bishop St. 
Room 1405 
Honolulu, HI 96813 



NOTJB: — Nasaaohusatta, Pannaylvanla, and Virginia ar* "Coomonwaal'th Stat*a. 



MSFCMA 



141 



OPTIMUM YIELD AND OTHER SPECIFICATIONS, INCLUDING AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR JOINT VENTURE 
PROCESSING: NORTH ATLANTIC, BY SPECIES, 1996 (1) 



Loligo 
squid 



Illex 
squid 



Atlantic 
mackerel 



Butter- 
fish 



Atlantic 
herring 



-Metric tons, round weight 



Maximum OY 
ABC 

Initial OY 

DAH 

DAP 

JVP 

TALFF 



(2) 44,000 

(5) 30,000 

25,000 

25,000 

25,000 





(2) 30,000 

(5) 30,000 

21,000 

21,000 

21,000 





(3) 

(5) 1,175,500 

105,500 

(6) 105,500 
50,000 
35,000 





(2) 


16,000 


(4) 


89,000 


(5) 


7,200 




89,220 




5,900 




89,220 




5,900 

5,900 






89,220 
49,220 
40,000 



(1) OY=Optimum Yield; ABC=Allowable Biological Catch; DAH=Domestic Annual Harvest; DAP=Domestic 

Annual Processing; JVP=Joint Venture Processing; and TALFF=Total Allowable Level of Foreign 
Fishing. 

(2) Maximum OY based on the Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic Mackerel, Squid and Butterfish. 

(3) Not applicable based on the Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic Mackerel, Squid and 

Butterfish. 

(4) Maximum OY based on the Preliminary Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic Herring. 

(5) Initial OY can increase to this amount. 

(5) Contains 20,500 metric tons projected recreational catch. 



Source: — NMFS, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, F/SF; and NMFS, Northeast Region, F/NER. 



142 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

14th and E Streets, NW 
Washington, D.C. 2023 



MAIL 

ROUTING 

CODE 



TELEPHONE 
NUMBER 



Secretary of Commerce 

William Daley 

Under Secretary for Oceans and Atmoshpere 

D. James Baker 



202-482-2112 



202-482-3436 



NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE 



1315 East-West Highway 

Silver Spring Metro Center #3 (SSMC) 

Silver Spring, MD 20910-3226 



Fxl 
Fx2 

Fz3 

F/EN 

F/ENl 
F/ENll 

F/HC 

F/HCxl 
F/HCl 
F/HC2 
F/HC3 

F/QMI 

F/OMII 
F/0MI2 
F/0MI3 

F/PR 

F/PRxl 
F/PRl 
F/PR2 
F/PR3 



Assistant Administrator for Fisheries 

Rolland A. Schmitten 

Deputy Assistant Administrator for Fisheries - 

David L. Evans 

Staff Office for Industry and Trade 
Linda Chaves 

Staff Office for Intergovernmental and 
Recreational Fisheries 
Richard Schaefer 

Equal Employment Opportunity 
Eula Brown 

Office of Law Enforcement — 

David McKinney 
Enforcement Operations Division 
Enforcement Programs Branch 

Office of Habitat Conservation — 

James Burgess 

Chesapeake Bay Program Office 
Watershed Division 
Habitat Protection Division 
Habitat Restoration Division 

Office of Operations, Management & Information 

Charles Karnella (Acting) 
Administrative & Budget Processes Division 
Planning and Development Division 
Information Management Division 

Office of Protected Resources — 

Hilda Diaz-Soltero 

Marine Biodiversity Team 
Permits and Documentation Division 
Marine Mammal Conservation Division 
Endangered Species Division 



301-713-2239 
301-713-2239 
301-713-2379 

301-427-2401 
301-713-2252 



301-427-2300 
301-427-2300 
301-427-2300 



301-713-2325 
410-267-5660 
301-713-2325 
301-713-2325 
301-713-0174 



301-713-2239 
301-713-2245 
301-713-2252 
301-713-2372 



301-713-2332 
301-713-2319 
301-713-2289 
301-713-2322 
301-713-1401 



(CONTINUED) 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



143 



Silver Spring, Md. 20910-3226 



MAIL 
RQI /H NQ 

F/SF 

FSFl 

F/SF2 

F/SF3 

F/SF4 

F/SF5 

F/SF6 

F/SF61 

F/ST 

F/STl 
F/ST2 
F/ST21 
F/ST3 

LAll 



GCF 



TELEPHONE 
NUMBER 



Office of Sustainable Fisheries — 

Gary Matlock 

Highly Migratory Species Division 
Financial Services Division 
Domestic Fisheries Division 
International Fisheries Division 
Regulatory Services Division 
Seafood Inspection Division 
National Seafood Laboratory 

Office of Science and Technology — 

William Fox 

Fisheries Statistics & Economics Division 

Research Analysis & Coordination Division 

Scientific Publications Unit 

International Science Coordination and 
Analysis Division 

Office of Congressional Affairs - Fisheries — 

Peter Hill (Acting) 

Office of Public Affairs - Fisheries — 

Scott Smullen / Gordon Helms 

Office of General Counsel - Fisheries — 

Margaret Hayes 



301- 
301- 
301- 
301- 
301- 
301- 
301- 
601- 

301- 
301- 
301- 
206- 



713-2334 
713-2347 
713-2390 
713-2341 
713-2376 
713-2337 
713-2355 
769-8964 

■713-2367 
•713-2328 
■713-2372 
■526-6107 



301-713-2288 



301-713-2263 



301-713-2370 



301-713-2231 



REFERRAL DIRECTORY - SILVER SPRING, MD OFFICES 



FOSEKX FEES AND PEBMITS — 301-713-2339 

Joint Ventures 
Regulations : 

Foreign Fishing 

U.S. Nationals Fishing in Russian EZ 

FXMftMieJAL SERVICES — 301-713-2390 

Compensation for Loss of Gear 
Construction, vessels (Tax Deferral Prog.) 
Insurance-Vessel Seizure by Foreign Govt. 
Loans and Loan Guarantees 

tTTsrtmY MaMa/agMRM T OPBR. — 301-713-2341 

Artificial Reefs 
Fishery Management Plans 
Fishery Regulations 

IHDnSTRY SERVICES — 301-713-2351 

Consumer Education and Marketing 
Exports/Imports Licenses & Trade Issues 
Saltonstall-Kennedy (S-K) Grants 

IHTERNATT nmT. ITTSmirBTKS — ^01 -71 3-9979 

Allocation (Foreign Fishing Catches) 
Foreign Fisheries (General) 



LAW ENFOP ruMmrr aw p fines — 301-427-2300 

Lacey Act (general information) 
Marine Mammal Protection Act (General) 
Permits and Regulations 

RESOORCES mVESTIGATIONS — 301-713-2367 

Acid Rain and Pollution 
Aquaculture Information 
Disease of Fish 
Ecology and Fish Recruitment 
Fishing Methods & Resource Abundance 
STATISTICAL DATA SERVICES — 301-713-2328 
Commercial Fisheries - Landings & Value 
Imports and Exports 
Market News Reports (General) 
Operating Units (Fishermen & Vessels) 
Processed Fishery Products 
Recreational Fisheries 

XJTILIZATIOai RESEARCB — 301-713-2328 

Botulism and Ciguatera Poisoning 
Nutrition and Quality of Fishery Products 
Safety and Products Standards 
Seafood Inspection and Identity 



144 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION 

NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE 



REGIONAL FACILITIES 



MAIL 

ROUTING 

CODE 

F/NE 



F/NEC 

F/NEC3 

F/NEC5 

F/NEC51 
F/NEC52 



F/NEC3 

F/SE 

F/SEC 

F/SEC4 

F/SEC5 

F/SEC6 

F/SEC7 



Northeast Region 
On« Blaclcbum Orlva 
Gloucastar, tOk. 01930 

Northeast Fisheries Science Center 
166 Water St. - Rm. 312 
Woods Hole, MA 02543 

Woods Hole Laboratory 
166 Water St. 
Woods Hole, MA 02543 

Sandy Hook Laboratory 
Building 74, McGruder 
Highlands, NJ 07732 

Milford Laboratory 
Milford, CT 06460 

Narragansett Laboratory 
28 Tarzell Drive 
Narragansett, RI 02882 

Oxford Laboratory 
609 S. Morris St. 
Oxford, MD 21654 

Natl. Systematics Laboratory, MRC153 
10th & Constitution Ave., NW 
Washington, DC 20560 

Southeast Region 
9721 Ex«cutlva C«ntar Drlva, H. 
St. P«tar8burg, FL 33702 

Southeast Fisheries Science 
Center, 75 Virginia Beach Dr. 
Miami, FL 33149 

Miami Laboratory 
75 Virginia Beach Dr. 
Miami, FL 33149 

Mississippi Laboratories 
3209 Frederick St., P.O. Drawer 1207 
Pascagula, MS 39567 

Panama City Laboratory 
3500 Delwood Beach Rd. 
Panama City, FL 32408 

Galveston Laboratory 
4700 Avenue U 
Galveston, TX 77551 



TELEPHONE AND FAX 
NUMBER 



508-281-9300 
Faz-281-9371 



508-495-2233 
Fax-495-2258 



508-495-2233 
Fax-495-2258 



908-872-3000 
FAX-872-3088 



203-783-4200 
FAX-783-4212 



401-782-3200 
Fax-782-3201 



410-226-5193 
FAX-226-5925 



202-357-2550 
FAX-357-1896 



813-570-5301 
FAX-570-5300 



305-361-4284 
FAX-361-4219 



305-361-4225 
FAX-361-4499 



601-762-4591 
FAX-769-9200 



904-234-6541 
FAX-235-3559 



409-766-3500 
FAX-766-3508 



LOCATION 
Gloucaatar, m 

Woods Hole, MA 

Woods Hole, MA 

Highlands, NJ 

Milford, CT 
Narragansett, RI 

Oxford, MD 

Washington, DC 

St . Pataxsburg, FX 

Miami, FL 
Miami, FL 
Pascagoula, MS 
Panama City, FL 
Galveston, TX 



(Contlnuad) 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION 
NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE 



145 



REGIONAL FACILITIES 



MAIL 

ROUTING 

CODE 



TELEPHONE and FAX 



LOCATION 



F/SEC8 Charleston Laboratory 
219 Fort Johnson Rd. 
Charleston, SC 29412 

F/SEC9 Beaufort Laboratory 
101 Fivers Island 
Beaufort, NC 28516 

F/NH Northwest Region 

7600 Sand Point Way, N.E. 
BIN C15700, Bldg. 1 
Seattle, HA 98115 

F/NWC Northwest Fisheries Science Center 
West Bldg. - Rm. 363 
2725 Montlake Boulevard, East 
Seattle, WA 98112 

F/SH Southwest Region 

501 West Ocean Blvd. , Suite 4200 
Long Beach, CA 90802 

F/SWC Southwest Fisheries Science Center 
8604 La Jolla Shores Dr. 
P.O. Box 271 
La Jolla, CA 92038 

F/SWC2 Honolulu Laboratory 

2570 Dole St., P.O. Box 3830 
Honolulu, HI 96812 

F/SWC3 Tiburon Laboratory 
3150 Paradise Dr. 
Tiburon, CA 94920 

F/SWC4 Pacific Fisheries Environmental Grc 
1352 Lighthouse Ave. 
Pacific Grove, CA 93950 

F/AK Alaska Region 

709 West 9th Street, Room 453 
P.O. Box 21668 
Juneau, AK 99802 

F/AKC Alaska Fisheries Science Center, 
7600 Sand Point Way, N.E. 
BIN C15700 - Bldg. #4 - Rm. 2149 
Seattle, WA 98115 

Kodiak Investigations 
P.O. Box 1638 
Kodiak, AK 99615 

F/AKC4 Auke Bay Laboratory 

11305 Glacier Highway 
Auke Bay, AK 99801 



803-762-8500 
FAX-762-8700 



919-728-3595 
FAX-728-8784 



206-526-6150 
FAX-526-6426 



206-860-3200 
FAX-860-3217 



562-980-4000 
FAX-980-4018 



619-546-7000 
FAX-546-7003 



808-943-1221 
FAX-943-1290 



415-435-3149 
FAX-435-3675 



408-648-8515 
FAX-648-8440 



907-586-7221 
FAX-586-7249 



206-526-4000 
FAX-526-4004 



907-487-4961 
FAX-487-5960 



907-789-6000 
FAX-789-6094 



Charleston, SC 



Beaufort, NC 



Seattle, WA 



Seattle, WA 



Long Beach, CA 



La Jolla, CA 



Honolulu, HI 



Tiburon, CA 



Pacific Grove, 
CA 



Juneau, AK 



Seattle, WA 



Kodiak, AK 



Auke Bay, AK 



146 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION 



NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE 
NATIONAL FISHERY STATISTICS OFFICES 



CITY 

MEW ENGLAMD 

Portland 

Rockland 
Boston 

(1) Gloucester 

Gloucester 
New Bedford 
Chatham 
Woods Hole 
Newport 
Pt. Judith 

MIDDLE ATIAMTIC 



TELEPHONE 
MUMBEB 



(1) Beaufort 

New Smyrna Beach 
Tequesta 

(DMlaml 

Key West 



207-780- 
FAX:780- 

207-594- 
FAX:596- 
617-223- 
FAX:223- 
617-223- 
FAX:223- 

508-281- 
FAX:281- 

508-281- 
FAX:281- 
508-999- 
FAX:990- 
508-945- 
FAX:945- 
508-548- 
FAX:548- 
401-847- 
FAX:842- 
401-783- 
FAX:782- 



3322 

3340 

5969 
7651 
8015 
8526 
■8012 
•8526 

9304 
9161 

■9307 
■9372 
■2452 
■2506 
■5961 
•3793 
•5123 
■5124 
•3115 
■0980 
■7797 
■2113 



New York 


212-620-3405 




FAX:620-3577 


East Hampton 


516-324-3569 




FAX:324-3314 


Patchogue 


516-475-6988 




FAX:289-8361 


Toms River 


908-349-3533 




FAX:349-4319 


Cape May 


609-884-2113 




FAX:884-4908 


CHESAPEAKE 




Ocean City 


410-213-2761 




FAX:213-7029 


Hampton 


757-723-3369 




FAX:728-3947 


SOUTH ATLANTir. 





919-728-8720 
FAX:728-8772 

904-427-6562 
FAX : SAME 

407-575-4461 
FAX : SAME 

305-361-4468 
FAX: 361-4460 

305-294-1921 
FAX : SAME 



NAME AND ADDRESS 



NO RT HEAST R EGION 



Robert C. Morrill / Scott McNamara, Marine Trade 

Center, Suite 212, Two Portland Fish Pier 

Portland, ME 04101 
Peter S. Marckoon, Federal Bldg., 21 Limerock St., 

Rm. 207, P.O. Box 708, Rockland, ME 04841 
Paul Sheahan, Statistics Office, 408 Atlantic Ave., 

Rm. 141, Boston, MA 02210 
Jack French, Boston Market News, 408 Atlantic Ave., 

Rm. 141, Boston, MA 02210 

Gragory R. Powar, Flshary Inf. S«ctlon, On* 
Blaclcbuzn Dr., Glouc«star, HH 01930 

Kelly McGrath / Don Mason, Rm. 107, 1 Blackburn Dr. 

Gloucester, MA 01930 
Dennis E. Main, U.S. Custom House, 37 N. Second St. 

New Bedford, MA 02740 
Lorraine Spenle, 29C Stage Harbor Road 

Chatham, MA 02633 
John Mahoney, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, 

166 Water St., Woods Hole, MA 02543 
Margaret Toner, Post Office Bldg., Thames St., 

Newport, RI 02840 
Walter Anoushian, 310 Great Island Rd., Rm. 203, 

P.O. Box 547, Narragansett, RI 02882 



Leo Gaudin / R. Santangello, New York Market News 

201 Varick Street, Rm. 731, New York, NY 10014 
Erik Braun, 62 Newtown Lane, Suite 203, 

East Hampton, NY 11937 
David McKernan, Social Security Bldg., 50 Maple 

Ave., P.O. Box 606, Patchoque, L.I., NY 11772 
Eugene Steady / Kathy Corbo, 2 6 Main St., 

P.O. Box 143, Toms River, NJ 08754 
Walt Makowski, 1382 Lafayette St., 

P.O. Box 624, Cape May, NJ 08204 



Ingo Fleming, 12904 Kelly Bridge Rd., 
P.O. Box 474, Ocean City, MD 21842 

David Ulmer / Steve Ellis, 1026 Settlers Landing 
Rd., Suite F, P.O. Box 436, Hampton, VA 23669 



SOUTHEAST REGION 



Nalsoji Johnson, B»aufort Laboratory, 101 P±^r»r 
Island Road, Baaufort, HC 28516 

Claudia Dennis, Coast Guard Station/Ponce 
P.O. Box 2025, New Smynra Beach, FL 32170 

Howard C. Schaefer, 19100 S.E. Federal Highway 
Tequesta, FL 33469 

Guy S. Davanport, 75 Virginia Baach Dr., 
Miami, FL 33149 

Edward J. Little, Jr., Post Office & Custom House 
Bldg., P.O. Box 269, Key West, FL 33040 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION 



147 



NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE 
NATIONAL FISHERY STATISTICS OFFICES 



CITY 

GULF 

Fort Myers 

St. Petersburg 

Panama City 

Mobile 

Pascagoula 

Chalmette 

Golden Meadow 

Houma 

Marrero 

New Iberia 

New Orleans 

Aransas Pass 

Brownsville/ 

Port Isabel 
Freeport 

(1) Galveston 

Port Arthur 



(l)Long Beach, CA 
or Honolulu, HI 



(1) Seattle 



(1) Juneau 



TELEPHONE 
NUMBEH 



941-334-4364 

FAX : SAME 
813-570-5393 
FAX:570-5300 
904-234-6541 
FAX:235-3559 
334-639-6493 

FAX : SAME 
601-762-7402 
FAX:769-9200 
504-277-0365 
FAX:271-9150 
504-632-4324 

FAX : SAME 
504-872-3321 

FAX : SAME 
504-872-1403 

FAX : SAME 
504-340-5820 

FAX : SAME 
318-365-1558 

FAX : SAME 
504-589-6151 
FAX:589-6149 
512-758-0436 

FAX : SAME 
210-548-2516 

FAX : SAME 
409-233-4551 

FAX : SAME 

409-7S6-3705 
FAX: 766-3543 

409-727-2271 
FAX : SAME 



562-980-4033 
FAX: 980-4047 



206-526-6128 
FAX: 526-4461 



907-586-7228 
FAX: 586-7465 



NAME AND ADDRESS 



Tom Herbert, 2000 Main St., Suite 409 

Fort Myers, FL 33901 
Vacant, 9721 Executive Center Drive, 

St. Petersburg, FL 33702 
Deborah Fable, 3500 Delwood Beach Rd., 

Panama City, FL 32407 
Ted Flowers, U.S. Coast Guard - ATC 

P.O. Box 97, Mobile, AL 36608 
Rene Labadens, Jr., 3209 Frederic St., Pascagoula 

Lab., P.O. Box Drawer 1207, Pascagoula, MS 39567 
Maggie Bourgeois / Jay Boulet, 2626 Charles Dr., 

Suite 201, Chalmette, LA 70043 
Gary J. Rousse, 290 E. 57th St. (Cutoff, LA 70345) 

P.O. Box 623, Golden Meadow, LA 70357 
Kathleen Hebert, 425 Lafayette St., Rm. 128, 

Houma, LA 70360 
Billy Ray Tucker, 1340 W. Tunnel Blvd., 

Suite 222, Houma, LA 70360 
Jan Simpson, 5201 Westbanlc Expressway, Suite 312, 

Marrero, LA 70072 
Linda F. Picou, 705-A West Admiral Doyle Dr. 

New Iberia, LA 70560 
Debbie Batiste, 423 Canal St., Rm. 213, 

New Orleans, LA 70130 
Roy Spears, 132 Cleveland Blvd., P.O. Box 1815, 

Aransas Pass, TX 78336 
Kit Doncaster / Edie Lopez, Shrimp Turning Basin, 

HC 70 Box 15, Brownville, TX 78521 
Thomas R. Mauermann, Texas Gulf Bank, Suite 213 

P.O. Box 2533, Freeport, TX 77542 

Hargot Hlghtowar or W. Kalth RoloartB 

4700 Avanua O, Bldg. 308, GalvaBton, TX 77551 

Linda S. Trahan, Federal Bldg., Bsn. 113, 

2875 Jimmy Johnson Blvd., Port Arthur, TX 77640 



SOUTHWEST REGION 



Patricia J. Donlay, 501 Wast Ocaan Boulavard, 
P.O. Box 32469, Long Baach, CA 90832 



NORTHWEST REGION 

John K. Bishop, 7600 Sand Point Way, HE, 
BIN C15700, Saattla, KA 98115 



Bldg. 1 



ALASKA REGION 

Patsy Baardan, Fadaral Building, 4th Floor, 
709 Wast 9th Straat, P.O. Box 21668 
JUnaau, AK 99802 



(1) Raglonal or araa haadquartars for statistics offlcas. 



148 



PUBLICATIONS 



URRARY INFORMATION 



The NOAA Library and Information Network Catalog 
(NOAALINC) resides on Stilas, an Integrated library system 
provided by the Sirs! Corporation. NOAALINC represents the 
automated holdings of the NOAA Central Library in Silver 
Spring, Maryland and 22 other NOAA libraries located around 
the U.S. Currently, the NOAALINC contains records for more 
than 200,000 items with 5,000-10,000 added each year. 



NOAALINC provides several search methods to 
locate records of items. Users can search for keywords in 
titles, subject headings, authors, or series. Users can browse 
indexes of titles, subject headings, authors, series, or call 
number. Each bibliographic record shows a brief description 
of the item with a ist of which libraries hold the item. The list of 
libraries will show the call number, item's specific information, 
and whether the item is available for circulation. 



NOAALINC is available to anyone, without 
restriction, 24 hours a day, every day of the year. Visitors 
to the NOAA Central Library can access the catalog thru 
wort<stations located throughout the Library. Remote users 
can access the catalog thru a link from the NOAA Central 
Library's homepage at - http7/www.lib.noaa.gov/. 



NOAA personnel may contact the nearest NOAA 
Library or the NOAA Central Library and arrange to borrow 
materials. The general public should contact their local 
ibrary to arrange for an interlibrary loan. Restrictions apply 
on circulation of certain materials. 



For further information contact the NOAA Central 
Library, 1315 East-West Highway., 2nd Floor, Silver 
Spring, MD 20910-3282. Telephone: 301-713-2699 
(Ext. 124) or E-mail: reference@nodc.noaa.gov. 



PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE FROM U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 



STATISTICAL REPORTS 



003-020-00167-0 Fisheries of the United States, 1995 
....$12.00 

003-020-00168-8 Fisheries of the United States, 1996 
...NA 



MISCEUANEOiJS REPORTS 



003-009-00635-0 United States Industrial Outlook 

1 994: Business Forecases for 350 
Industries . . .$48.00 

003-009-00650-3 United States Industrial Outlook 

1 995: Business Forecases for 350 
Industries. . .$19.00 

003-009-00650-3 U.S. Global Outlook (Name change) 
1 995: Business Forecases for 350 
Industries.. .$20.00 



003-009-00618-0 United States Industrial Outlook 

1 993: Business Forecases for 350 
Industries . . .$37.00 



S/N 703-023- Fishery Bulletin (Quarterly): Publishes 
00000-2 Original Research Papers, etc. 

(FB) 2D $32.00 a year 



For information or to purchase publications listed above (Advance 
Payment Required), call or write: 



Superintendent of Documents 

U.S. Government Printing Office 

Wostiington, DC 20202 

PHONE: 202-512-1800 / FAX: 512-2250 



PUBLICATIONS 



149 



PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE FROM NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE AND 

NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE (NTIS) 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



SCIENTIFIC PUBLIC ATIONR: 

Information on formal sdentific publications by NMFS 
(such as NMFS journals and technical publications) may be 
obtained from the Sdentific Publications Office (F/NWR1), 
7600 Sand Point Way, N.E., BIN C-15700, Seattle, WA 
98115. 

Telephone: 206-526-6107 



CURRENT FISHERY fJTATIfJTICfi fCFS) SERIFS 

The reports listed below are in the Current Fisheries 
Statistics (CFS) series. They are statistical bulletins on marine 
recreational fishing, commercial fishing, and on the 
manufacture and commerce of fishery products. For further 
information or to obtain a subscription to these publications, 
contact the office shown below: 



NOAA, National Marine Fisheries Sen/ice 
Fisheries Statistics Division (F/ST1) 

1335 East-West Highway 

Silver Spring, MD 20910-3226 

Telephone: 301-713-2328 

The bulletins shown below cover freezings and 
holdings, the production of various processed products, and 
the U.S. foreign trade in fishery products. If you wish a copy of 
the folbwing publications, check the designated space ( ) and 
return to the Office indicated above. The following are available 
annually: 

FF - Frozen Rshery Products 

( ) MF-Processed Rshery Products 

The following publication is only available quarterly. 

( ) Rsh Meal and Oil 

OTHER PURIICATinNS 

All publications listed below may be obtained from 
NTIS (address and phone number listed on page 1 54) or the 
originating office (code follows in parentheses). Copies are 
available only as long as supply lasts. 



( ) Endangered Species Act, Biennial Report, Status of 
Recovery Program, FY 1989-1991. (F/PR) 

( ) Rshery Management Plan for Sharks of the Atlantic Ocean. 
(F/SF) 

( ) Habitat Protection Activity Report. 1 9.91 - 1 993. (F/PR) 

( ) Magnuson Rshery Conservation and Management Act, As 
Amended through November 28, 1 990. (F/SF) 

Marine Mammal Protection Act, Annual Report. 1988- 
1989. (F/PR) 

Marine Mammal Protection Act, Annual Report. 1990- 
1991. (F/PR) 

( ) Our Living Oceans - The Rrst Annual Report on the 
Status of U.S. Living Marine Resources. (F/ST) 

( ) Our Living Oceans - Report on The Status of U.S. Living 
Marine Resources, 1 992 Data. (F/ST) 

( ) Our Living Oceans - Report on The Status of U.S. Living 
Marine Resources, 1993 Data. (F/ST) 

( ) Our Living Oceans - Report on The Economic Status of the 
U.S. Fisheries, 1996. (F/ST) 

( ) Report on Apportionments of Membership on the Regional 
Rshery Management Council (RFMCs) in 1994. (F/SF) 

( ) The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Rsheries 
Development and Utilization Research and Development 
Grants (F/IS) 

( ) The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program: Rsheries 
Development and Utilization Research and Development 
Grants - Annotated Bibliography (F/SF) 

( ) USDC Approved List of Fish Establishments and Products 
~ Semi-Annual Report. (National Seafood Inspection 
Laboratory, Pascagoula, MS.) 

AquacuHure and Capture Fisheries: Impacts in U.S. 
Seafood Maricets. (NTIS No. PB-88-204185/GBA) 

Deveiopments of Value Added, Margin and Expenditures 
for Marine Fisliery Products. (NTIS No. PB-89-1 251 08) 



150 



PUBLICATIONS 



Marine Mammal Strandings In the United States: 
Proceedings of the Second Marine Mammal Stranding 
Workshop, 1987. 1991. Reynolds, John E., Ill and Daniel K. 
Odell, (editors). (NOAA-TR-NMFS-98). 157 p. (F/PR) 

Protecting Marine Mammals: Look from a Distance... but 
Dont Touch, Feed or Harm In the Wild. Prepared by the 
Texas Sea Grant Program for the Office of Protected 
Resources, NMFS, 1992. 6 p. (F/PR) 

Recovery Plan for the Humpback (Megaptora 
novaeangliao). Prepared by the Humpbxack Whale 
Recovery Team for the National Marine Fisheries Service, 
1991. 1992. Silver Spring, Maryland. 105 p. (F/PR) 



Recovery Plan for the Kemp's Ridley Sea Turtle 
(Lepidochefys kompilt. Prep>ared by the Kemp's Ridley 
Recovery Team for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and 
NMFS, 1992. Washington, DC. (F/PR) 

Recovery Plan for Leatherback Turtles in the U.S. 
Caribbean, Atkxitic, aid Gulf of Mexico. National Marine 
Fisheries Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 1992. 
Washington, D.C. (F/PR) 

Recovery Plan for the Northern Right Whale (Eubalaena 
gktcialis). Prepared by the Right Whale Recovery Team 
for the National Marine Fisheries Service, 1991. 1992. 
Silver Spring, Maryland. 86 p. (F/PR) 

Recovery Pkxi for U.$. Population of Atlantic Green Turtle. 

National Marine Fisheries Service, and Fish and Wiidlife 
Service. 1991. Washington, D.C. (F/PR) 



Recovery Plan for U.S. Population of Loggerhead Turtle 
(Corona carotta). Prepared by the Loggerhead/Green 
Turtle Recovery Team for the U.S. Fish and Wiidiife Service 
and NMFS. 1992. Washington, DC. (F/PR) 



Recovery Plan for the Steller Sea Lion lEumotopias 
fiOxilus). Prepared by the Steiler Sea Uon Recovery Team 
for the National Marine Fisheries Service. 1992. Silver 
Spring, Maryland. 92 p. (F/PR) 

Striped Bass Research Study Report for 1993. National 
Marine Fisheries Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 
1995. Silver Spring, Maryland. 34 p. (F/SF) 



COMMERCI AL FISHERIES: 

Fisheries of the United States is a preliminary 
report with historical comparisons on the Nation's fishing, 
fish processing, and foreign trade in fishery products. The 
following reports are available through NTIS. 



Ywr 


Accession No. 


1966 


COM-75- 10662 


1967 


COM-75-10663 


1968 


COM-75-10664 


1969 


COM-75-10665 


1970 


COM-71-50081 


1971 


COM-75-10666 


1972 


COM-73-50644 


1973 


COM-74-.'ia546 


1974 


COM-75-10862 


1975 


PB-253966 


1976 


PB-268662 


1977 


PB-282741 


1978 


PB-297083 


1979 


PB-80-201593 


1980 


PB^I-241648 


1981 


PB-82-215542 


1982 


PB-83-216473 


1983 


PB-84-195148 


1984 


PB-86- 144953 


1985 


PB-87-143145 


1986 


PB-88-164132 


1987 


PB-88-215173 


1988 


PB-89-216485 


1989 


PB-91 -129-320 


1990 


PB-92-174523/AS 


1991 


PB-93-204536/AS 


1992 


PB-94- 156387 


1993 


PB-95-219192 



Fisheries Statistics of the United States (Statisflcai 
Digest) is a final report on the Nation's commercial 
fisheries showing more detail than Fisheries of Ihe United 
States. 



Year 


Ac<?9»i9fi Np. 


1939 


COM-75-11265 


1940 


COM-75-11266 


1941 


COM-75-11267 


1942 


COM-75-11268 


1943 


COM-75- 11269 



PUBLICATIONS 



151 



Yew 


Acce99iQn Np. 


1944 


COM-75-11270 


1945 


COM-75-11271 


1946 


COM-75-11272 


1947 


COM-75-11273 


1948 


COM-75-11274 


1949 


COM-75-11275 


1950 


COM-75-11056 


1951 


COM-75-11053 


1952 


COM-75-11054 


1953 


COM-75-11055 


1954 


COM-75-11057 


1955 


COM-75-11058 


1956 


COM-75-11059 


1957 


COM-75-11060 


1958 


COM-75-11061 


1959 


COM-75-11062 


1960 


COM-75-11063 


1961 


COM-75-11064 


1962 


COM-75-11065 


1963 


COM-75-11066 


1964 


COM-75-11067 


1965 


COM-75-11068 


1966 


PB-246429 


1967 


PB-246430 


1968 


COM-72-50249 


1969 


COM-75-10887 


1970 


COM-75-10643 


1971 


COM-74-51227 


1972 


COM-75-11430 


1973 


PB-262058 


1974 


PB-277796 


1975 


PB-300625 


1976 


PB-81 -163438 


1977 


PB-84-1 92038 


HKTORICAL REPORTS 



Historical Catch Statistics is a series of 
publications reporting catch of certain species in ihe United 
States for historical purposes. The following reports are 
available through NTIS: 

Atlantic and Gulf Coast States, 1879 - 1989. Current 
Fisheries Statistics No. 9010 • Historical Series Nos. 5-9 
Revised. Report covers total landings for major species, by 
state and by region. (NTIS No. PB-93-1 74266) 



Atlantic and Gutf Coast States, 1950 - 1991. Current 
Fisheries Statistics No. 9210 - Historical Series No. 10- 
Revised. Report covers landings and value of major species, 
by Region. (NTIS No. PB-93-1 74274) 



IMPORTS AND 


EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS. 


Annual Summary 




Year 


Accession No. 


1982 


PB-92-218635 


1983 


PB-92-218643 


1984 


PB-92-214972 


1985 


PB-92-222280 


1986 


PB-92-228196 


1987 


PB-92-228055 


1988 


PB-92-222272 


1989 


PB-92-222264 


1990 


PB-92-222256 


1991 


PB-92-221803 


1992 


PB-95-219499 


1993 


PB-95-219481 


1994 


PB-95-219507 


MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHING 



1970 Sait-Water Angling Survey, PB-265416. 

Determination of the Number of Commercial and Non- 
commercial Recreational Boats in the United States, 
Their Use, and Selected Characteristics, COM-74-1 1 1 86. 

Participation in Marine Fishinf. 

Northeastern United States, 1973-74, COM-75-10655. 
Southeastern United States, 1974, PB-273160. 



MARINE RECREATJONAL FISHERY STATISTICS 
SII£YE1: 



Atlantic and Gulf Coasts: 
Year 



Accession No . 



1979-«) 

1979(Revlsed)-1980 

1981-1982 



PB-84-1 99652 
PB-89-102552 
PB-89-1 02560 



152 



PUBLICATIONS 



Atlantic and Gulf Coasts - Continued: 



Ywr 


Accession No. 


1983-1984 


PB-89-1 02628 


1985 


PB-89-1 02669 


1986 


PB-89-1 02701 


1987-1989 


PB-92-1 74820 


1990-1991 


(F/ST1) 


f MtfiV Cffflrf- 




1981-1982 


PB-89-1 02925/AS 


1983-1984 


PB-89-1 02933/AS 


1985 


PB-89-1 02941 /AS 


1986 


PB-89-1 02958/AS 


1987-1989 


(F/ST1) 



PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 



Annual Summary 




jfeac 


Accession No. 


1979 


PB-89-215248/AS 


1980 


PB-89-215255/AS 


1981 


PB-89-215263/AS 


1982 


PB-89-215289/AS 


1883 


PB-89-215271/AS 


1984 


PB-89-215297/AS 


1985 


PB-89-215305/AS 


1986 


PB-89-215313/AS 


1987 


PB-92-1 72956 


1988 


PB-92-204528/AS 



STATE JANDINCS 

Maine: 1946-76, PB-271-296; 1977-79. PB-1 28258. 

Massachusetts: 1943-76, PB-275866; 1977-79, PB-81- 
143182. 

Rhode Island: 1 954-77; PB-287627; 1 978-79. PB-81 - 
157158. 



New York: 1954-76. PB-275449; 1977-79. PB-81 -134546. 

New Jersey: 1952-76, PB-275696; 1977-79, PB-81 -159048 

Maryland: 1960-76, PB-300636; 1977-79, PB-81 -1 59003. 

Virginia: 1960-76, PB-300637; 1977-79, PB-82-151960. 

North Carolina: 1955-76, PB-288928; 1977-79, PB-82- 
151978. 

South Carolina: 1957-76, PB-289405; 1977-79, PB-81 - 
163198. 

Georgia: 1956-76. PB-289814; 1977-79. PB-81 -1571 66. 

Florida: 1 950-76. PB-292068. 

Alabama: 1950-77, PB-80-121262; 1978, PB-82-1 68071 . 

Mississippi: 1951-77, PB-80-121270; 1978. PB-82-1 69079. 

Louisiana: 1957-77. PB-300583; 1978, PB-82-1 68063. 

Texas: 1 949-77, PB-300603; 1978-79, PB-82-1 69004. 

Shrimp Landings: 1956-76, PB-80-124696; 1978-79, PB-82- 
156183. 

Gutf Coast Shrimp Data: 1958-76, PB-80-1 26899; 1978- 
79, PB-82-1 70390. 

INTERNATIONAL REPORTS 



In 1993, the Office of International Affairs, NMFS, 
prepared a six-volume study which analyzes past, present, and 
future trends in the world's distant-water fishing fleets. The 
subjects covered include catch, fishing areas, vessel 
construction and imports, flag-of-convenience registration, 
international agreements, and joint ventures. These studies 
can be purchased through the National Technical Information 
Service (NTIS) using the following titles and reference 
numbers. 



World fishing Fleets: An analysis of Distance-water Fleet 
Operations. Complete six-volume set. (NTIS No. PB-94- 
14081 1/GBA). 

Volume I: Executive Summary. Overview of world distance- 
water fishing fleets and summarizes regional trends. 54 p. 
(NTIS No. PB-94-140829/GBA). 



PUBLICATIONS 



153 



Volume 11: Africa. Compilation of information by U.S. 
Embassies on fleet operations in selected African countries. 
51 p. (NTIS No. PB-94-140837/GBA). 

Volume III: Asia. Overview of Asian fleets and individual 
studies of China, Japan, Republic of Korea, and Taiwan fleets. 
144 p. (NTIS No. PB-94-140845/GBA). 

Volume IV: Latin America. Overview of Caribbean Central 
America, South America, and individual reports on the Latin 
American fleets engaged in distant-water fisheries. 513 p. 
(NTIS No. PB-94-140852/GBA). 

Volume V: Baltic States, Commonwealth of Independent 
States, and Eastem Europe. Overview of each of these three 
blocs and 10 individual country studies including Russia, 
Poland, and Ukraine. 286 p. (NTIS No. PB-94-140860/GBA). 

Volume VI: Western Europe and Canada. Overview 
sections for Europe Community and non-EC countries and 
individual country studies for all West European fishing nations 
and Canada. 362 p. (NTIS No. PB-94-140878/GBA). 



OTHER REP ORTS FROM THE OFFICE OF 
INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES (FIIA) 

Available Foreign Rsheries Market Reports, 1976-1983. 

These lists detail available reports covering 59 countries and 
regions. (NTIS No. ITA-83-02-0I0/GBA). 

Available Foreign Fishery Reports, 1984-1992. Covering 
the same information as the 1 976-1 983 report. (F/IA2). 

World Salmon CuKure (NTIS No. PB-93-134617/GBA). 

World Shrimp Culture (NTIS No. PB-93-134625/GBA). 



J.M. Quintal, and T.D. Smith. 1994. NOAA Tech. Momo. 
WMFSF/NEC-103. (NTIS No. PB-95-1 08213). 

Ownership of Renewable Ocean Resources. Edwards, 
S.F. 1994. Mar. flesouf. Econ. 9:253-273. (F/NEC). 

Scaling Fisheries: The Science of Measuring the Effects 
of Fishing, 1855-1955. Smith, T.D. 1994. Cambridge, 
England: Cambridge University Press. (F/NEC). 

Second Survey of Fish Collections in the United States 
and Canada. Poss, S.G., and B.B. Collette. 1995. Copeia 
1 995(1 ):48-70. (F/NEC). 



Status of Fishery Resources off the Northeastern United 
States for 1995. Consen/ation and Utilization Division, 
Northeast Rsheries Science Center. 1995. NOAA Tech. 
Memo. NMFSHE-\OQ. (NTIS No. PB-95-263414). 



SOUTHEAST REGION: 



Habitat Protection Accomplishments of the National 
Marine Rsheries Service - Fiscal Year 1996. Habitat 
Conservation Division, Southeast Regional Office. 1996. 88 
p.+Appen. (F/SER). 

National Marine Fisheries Service Guidelines for 
Proposed Wetland Attemation in the Southeastern United 
States. Habitat Consen/atlon Division. Southeast Regional 
Office. March 1992. 17 p. (F/SER). 

Summary of Federal Aid Grants and Cooperative 
Agreements Programs, National Marine Fisheries 
Service, Southeast Region, 1986-1995. Sutter, Frederick 
C. 1985. 112p. (F/SER) 



NORTHEAST REGION 



SOUTHWEST REGION: 



A History of Benthic Research in the NMFS Northeast 
Fisheries Science Center. Steimie, F.W., J.M. Burnett, and 
R.B.Theroux. 1995. Afar. F/s/7. flev. 57(2):1-13. (F/NEC). 

History of Salmon Fisheries and Management In the North 
Atlantic. Friedland, K.D. 1994. ICES Coop. Res. Rep. 
197:6-22. (F/NEC). 

Marine Mammal Studies Supported by the Northeast 
Fisheries Science Center during 1980-89. Waring, G.T., 



A Global Perspective on ArtHlcal Reefs and Fish 
Aggregating Devices. In indo-Pacific Fishery 
Commission (IPFC), Proceedings of the Symposium on 
Artificial Reefs and Fish Aggregating Devices as Tools for 
the Management and Enhancement of Marine Fishery 
Resources, Colombo, Sri Lanica, 14-17 May 1990. 
Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (RAPA), Food and 
Agriculture Organization of the United States, Bandkok. 
(F/SWC). 



154 



PUBLICATIONS 



Biodiversity and the Sustainabiiity of Marine Fisheries. 

Boehlert, G. W. 1996. Oceanography 9(1): 28-35. (F/SWC). 



NORTHWEST REGION: 



Hawaii Longllne Vessel Economics. IHamilton, M. S., R. E. 
Curtis, M. D. Travis.1996. Mar. Res. Econ. 11:137-140. 
(F/SWC) 



Hawaiian Monic Seals: Past, Present and Future. Brownell, 
R. L, Jr. 1996. IBI Reports 6:35-41. (F/SWC) 



The Hawaiian Monic Seal in the Northwestern Hawaiian 
Islands, 1993. Johanos, T. C, and T. J. Ragen (eds.). 
1996. 141 p. (NOAA-TM-NMFS-SWFSC-227). (F/SWC) 



Status Review of Pinic Salmon from Washington, Oregon, 
and California. Hard, J.J., R.G. Kope, W.S. Grant, F.W. 
Waknitz, LT. Parker, and R.S. Waples. 1996. (NOAA-TM- 
NMFS-NWFSC-25) 131 p. (NTIS No. PB96-1 62607) 

Status Review of West Coast Steeihead from Washington, 
Idaho, Oregon, and California. Busby, P.J., T.C. 
Wainwright, G.J. Bryant, L Lierheimer, R.S. Waples, F.W. 
Waknitz. and I.V. Lagomarsino. 1996. (NOAA-TIWI-NMFS- 
NWFSC-27) 261 p. (NTIS No. PB96-21 01 66). 



AIASKA REGION: 



The Hawaiian Monic Seal in the Northwestern Hawaiian 
Islands, 1994. Johanos, T. C, and T. J. Ragen. 1996. 
1 1 1 p. (NOAA-TM-NMFS-SWFSC-229). (F/SWC) 



The Japanese Market for U.S. Tuna Products. Sonu, S. C. 
1994. (NOAA-TM-NMFS-SWR-029). 64 p. (S/SWR). 

The Japanese Sea Urchin Market. Sonu, S.C. 1995. 
(NOAA-TM-NIWIFS-SWR-030). 33 p. (F/SWR). 



The Japanese Sablefish Market. Sonu, S.C. 
(NOAA-TM-NMFS-SWR-031). 52p. (F/SWR). 



1996. 



Japan's Mackerel Market. Sonu, S.C, September 1992. 
(NOAA-TM-NMFS-SWR-027). (F/SWR). 



Private Property Rights and Crises in World Fisheries: 
Turning the Tide? Grafton, R. Q., D. Squires, and J. E. 
Kirkley. 1996. Contemp. Econ. Policy 14:91-99. (F/SWC) 



Fur Seal Investigations, 1994. Sinclair, E.H. (editor). 1996. 
(NOAA-TM-AFSC-69). 144 p. (NTIS No. PB97-1 29456). 

Oregon, Washington, and Alaska exports of edible fishery 
products, 1994. Kinoshita, R. K., and J. M. Terry. 1996. 
(NOAA-TM-AFSC-63). 49 p. (NTIS No. PB96-1 83553). 

Oregon, Washington, and Alaska exports of edible fishery 
products, 1995. Kinoshita, R. K., and J. M. Terry. 1996. 
(NOAA-TM-AFSC-66). 48 p. (NTIS No. PB96-214663). 

Status of Pacific Salmon and Steeihead Escapements In 
Southern Alaska. Baker, T. T., A. C. Wertheimer, R. D. 
Burkett, R. Dunlap, D. M. Eggers, E. I. Fritts, A. J. Gharrett, R. 
A. Holmes, and R. L. Wilmot. 1996. Fisheries 2\{\Q): 6-18. 
(F/AKC). 

The Threatened Status of Steiier Sea Lions, Eumetoplas 
Jubatus, Under the Endangered Species Act: Effects on 
Alaska Groundfish Fisheries Management. Fritz, L.W., R. 
C. Ferrero, and R.J. Berg. 1995. Mar. Fish. Rev. 57(2):14-27. 
(F/AKC). 



To purchase the preceding reports listed with ffTIS, call or write: 



NTIS -ATTN: Order Desk 
5285 Port Royal Road 
Springfield, VA 2216 



PHONE: 703-487-4650 / FAX: 321-8547 



SERVICES 155 



NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE 
FISHERIES MARKET NEWS 



BULLETIN BOARDS 



Several National Marine Fisheries Service offices provide public access to electronic bulletin board services operating 
24-hours a day to furnish the fishing industry with current information. Listed below are necessary facts needed to 
access these bulletin boards via a personal computer. 



Alaska Region : 

The Alaska Regional service is available by dialing 907-586-7259 at no parity, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, full duplex. The 
bulletin board operates on a 80486 standalone PC with 4 MB of memory and four 14,400 baud modems. A menu- 
driven system directs callers to areas and manages viewing of files, downloading, and in certain cases, uploading 
files. A message utility handles transfer of mail between users and to the sysop. Information is organized in ANSI 
format into categories consisting of: news releases; regulations; current catch statistics; allocations / seasons / closure 
histories; PacFIN data; and miscellaneous information. Catch statistics are updated weekly, other files are added as 
needed. For additional information contact Galen Tremble, 907-586-7228, at the Alaska Regional Office. 

Northwest Region: 

The Northwest Regional Office service is available by dialing 206-526-6405 at 2400 baud, no parity, 8 data bits, 1 stop 
bit, full duplex. (Ttie region plans to upgrade baud rate to 28.8 by January 1995.) Information is presented through a 
system of menus and displayed on-line. A variety of reports are included: current groundfish and salmon 
regulations;current entry program, limited entry groundfish permits; foreign trade news and data files; HACCP FDA 
information; Saltonstall / Kennedy Program; view your account; testing system; NMFS news and phone numbers; list 
of files or fransfers; and miscellaneous information. For additional information contact John Bishop, 206-526-61 1 9, at 
the Northwest Regional Office. 

Southwest Region: 

The Southwest Regional Office service is available by dialing 310-980-4059 at 2400 baud, no parity, 8 data bits, 1 stop 
bit, full duplex. Information is presented in the form of bulletins organized through a system of menus and displayed 
on-line. Announcements include Federal Register notices of seasons, trip limits, and quotas for groundfish, salmon, 
and coastal pelagic fisheries. Trade and industry reports are available for fishery product imports into Southern 
California / Arizona / Hawaii, canned tuna industry updates and status of canned tuna import quotas, catch reports and 
the status of quotas or allocations for various California fisheries, a calendar of public meetings and events. Pacific 
Council News and information concerning protected species and marine recreational fisheries. For additional 
information contact Dan Viele, 310-980-4039, at the Southwest Regional Office. 



156 SERVICES 



NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE 
FISHERIES MARKET NEWS 

FAX-ON-DEMAND SYSTEM 



The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has collected market information at principal U.S. ports for 60 
years. In an effort to provide a continuing high level of service to the seafood community this information is now 
available through the NMFS Fax-on-Demand Service. Up-to-date information on various landings data, 
wholesale values, foreign trade, cold storage holdings, trade leads, and Japanese market are now just a phone 
call away. The cost to you is a phone call, the service is free. Please feel free in helping NMFS spread the 
word about the Fax-on-Demand Service. 



INSTRUCTIONS 

You must place your call from a fax machine. At any fax machine, pick up handset (or use 
speaker phone capability, if so equipped) and using the fax machine's numeric keypad, dial the 
NMFS Fax Management System phone number: 



301 - 713 - 1415 



A human voice will greet you and welcome you to the NMFS Fax Management System and wil 
immediately ask you to enter your Fax Mailbox Number, followed by the pound (#) sign. 
Respond by entering the mailbox number for Fisheries Market News: 



200# 



3. After you are welcomed to the Fisheries Market News Fax Service you will be guided by a series of 
human voice prompts. First your are given the opportunity to enter a document numbier (like 
those found on the document listing), followed by the pound (#) sign: 

Examples: For daily New York Fulton Market Fresh Prices, enter 21# 
For most recent Cold Storage Report enter 71 # 

For a list of available documents (Menu of Document Choices), enter 1# 

4. Follow remaining voice prompts for confirmation of selection(s) and entering additional document 
numbers. After you have selected the documents you want, you will be prompted to press the 
pound (#) key to proceed. 

5. You will now be asked to press the START or SEND key on fax machine. Wait until you hear the 
typical fax tone indicating a good connection and hang up the handset. 

Please call (301-713-2328) for further information or if you have any questions or problems. 



SERVICES 



157 



NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE 
FISHERIES MARKET NEWS 

FAX-ON-DEMAND MENU CHOICES - MAILBOX #2\00 
FAX: (301) 713-1415 



DOCUMENT 
NUMBER 



REPORT 



UPDATE 
SCHEDULE 



1 Menu Choices 

2 Commonly Used Abbreviations 

5* Trade Leads Friday 

NEW YORK: Leo Gaudin (212)620-3405 

21* Fulton Marl<et Fresli Prices Daily 

22* New York Frozen Prices Friday 

BOSTON: Jack French (617)223-8018 

30 Boston Lobster Prices Daily (exc.Wed) 

31* New England Auction Daily 

32* Boston Frozen Market Prices Wednesday 

33 New England Auction Summary Friday 

34 New Enaland Cold Storage Friday 
NEW ORLEANS: Maggie Bourgeois (504)589-6151 

41 Gulf Shrimp Landings by Area and Species Monday 

42 Ex-Vessel Gulf Fresh Shrimp Prices and Landings Monday 

43 Gulf Finfish and Shellfish Landings Monday 
44* Fish Meal and Oil Prices Thursday 
45* Shrimp Statistics Monthly 

LONG BEACH: Patricia Donley (310)980-4033 

52 San Pedro, CA Market Prices Friday 

53 Canned Tuna Import Quota Update Friday 
55 United States Tuna Cannery Receipts Monthly 

SEATTLE: John Bishop (206) 526-61 1 9 

61 Wholesale Canned Salmon Prices (West Coast) Tuesday 

62* Wholesale Shellfish Prices (West Coast) Tuesday 

63 Preliminary Oregon Landings Tuesday 

64 Halibut & Sablefish Total IFQ Landings Weekly 

65 Groundfish: Gulf of Alaska - Preliminary Catch Weekly 

66 Bering Sea & Aleutians - Preliminary Catch Weekly 

67 Oregon Landings & Exvessel Price Monthly 

68 Washington Landngs & Exvessel Price Monthly 
NMFS HEADQUARTERS: William Uttley (301)713-2328 

71* National Cold Storage Monthly 

72 West Coast Cold Storage Monthly 

73 Foreign Trade of Selected Products Monthly 

74 Imports of Shrimp Monthly 

75 Imports of Frozen Fish Blocks Monthly 

76 Fish Meal and Oil Production Quarterly 
JAPANESE DATA: Long Beach - Sunee C. Sonu (310) 980-4038 

81 Japanese Shrimp Imports Monthly 

82 Japanese Fishery Imports Monthly 

83 Japanese Fishery Exports Monthly 

84 Japanese Cold Storage Holdings Monthly 

85 Tokyo Wholesale Shrimp Prices Bi-weeKly 

86 Tokyo Wholesale Prices Bi-weekly 

87 Fish Landings and Average Ex-vessel Prices Monthly 

88 Sales Volume and Average Wholesale Prices Monthly 



UPDATE SCHEDULES: 3:00 pm ET. 

*NOTE:~Accessible via (internet) - http://remora.ssp.nmfs.gov/ 



158 SERVICES 



NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE 
FISHERIES MARKET NEWS 

HOME PAGES 

The National Marine Fisheries Service provides information on programs and data available to the public and fishing industry 
via home page. Please use the folbwing address for NMFS' home page - http://kingfish.ssp.nrTils.gov/home-page.html 
through a personal computer. If you wish to access Individual office home pages the addresses and a brief description 
follows: 

Fisheries Statistics - htlp://remora.ssp.nmfs.gov/. Descriptions of commercial and recreational fisheries statistics data 
collection programs. Access to commercial monthly landings data bases, Marine Recreational Rsheries Statistics Survey 
(MRFSS) data, cold storage, Mari^et News Reports, processed products data, and trade data base. 

Inspection Program- http://kingfish.ssp.nmfs.gov/iss/issue.html. Provides information on the National Voluntary 
Seafood Inspection Program, list of approved fish establishments and products, fees and charges, and policies for 
advertising services and mari<s. 

Saitonstaii-Kennedy Grant Program • http://www.nmfs.gov/sfweb/skhome.htmi. Description of the Saltonstall- 
Kennedy (S-K) Program, the most recent solicitation for proposals, application forms and instructions, FAQs, and Regional 
contacts for the S-K Program, as well as the latest update to the S-K Annotated Bibliography of completed projects. 

Protected Resources - http://kingfish.ssp.nmfs.gov/. Contains recovery efforts for species considered endangered 
or threatened; depleted species of marine mammals; and a comprehensive list of other Internet resources pertaining to 
protection programs and other issues. Information on Endangered Species Act and Marine Mammal Protection Act. 

Northeast Regk>n - http://www.nero.nmfs.gov/doc/nero.html. Describes the mission and responsibilities of the Regional 
Office Staffs and Divisions. Provides information on fisheries regulations, quota reports for summer flounder, and links to 
other NOAA sites. 

Northeast Scientific Center - http://www.nefsc.nmfs.gov. Provides press releases, lab descriptions, history of fisheries 
in the New England Region (photos, timeline, and outline of NE groundfish history). Includes fish facts (questions and 
answers) and status of the stocks by species for the Region. 

Southeast Regk>n - http://caklera.sero.nmfs.gov/. Provides information on regional Federal activities including: fisheries 
regulations, vessel and dealer permits, fishery management plan implementation/quotas, marine mammals and endangered 
species management and protection, habitat protection and restoration activities, and federal aid programs for grants and 
cooperative agreements. 

Southeast Fisheries Science Center - http://www.sefsc.noaa.gov/. Describes the mission of the Center in support 
of NMFS including laboratories dedicated to research covering North Caroina-Texas and the Caribbean. Provides research 
data to support the programs which include large marine ecosystem, collecting and reporting statistical/economic data, 
fishery resource consen/ation, protection of marine mammals and endangered species, and impact analysis / environmental 
assessments. 



SERVICES 



159 



NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE 
FISHERIES MARKET NEWS 

HOME PAGES 

Alaska Region - http://wwwfak.afsc.noaa.gov/akr-home.htm. Provides information on in season state of groundfish, 
catch statistics, new releases, regulations, maps, and tables. Sablefish and halibut quota program, catch data and appeal 
cases. Information on Marine Mammal Authorization Program. 

Alaska Fisheries Science Center - http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/. Describes the mission of the Center and the 
organization and purpose of its laboratories, divisions, and programs dedicated to Federal fisheries research in the coastal 
oceans off Alaska and the West Ckjast of the United States and marine mammal research in the Antarctic, Arctic, Alaska 
and California current ecosystems. 

Northwest Fisheries Science Center - http://research.nwfsc.noaa.gov/nwfsc-homepage.html. Describes Center's 
research programs by division, including status assessments and recovery of endangered salmon species, chemical 
pollutants in coastal ecosystems throughout the U.S., and monitoring and assessments of west coast groundfish. Also 
includes staff directory, current Center news, publications and library resource information. 

Southwest Region - http://swr.ucsd.edu. Described the mission and responsibilities of the regional office. Provides 
Information on fisheries statistics, policies, and links with other pertinent sites. 

Southwest Fisheries Science Center - http://swfsc.ucsd.edu. Descriptions of programs, laboratories, geographic 
scope, center organization, research vessels, upper level scientific/management staffs, publications, newsletters (tuna and 
billfish), and mission of the Center. Information on types of research being conducted on fishes, marine mammal, sea 
turtles, habitat and marine ecosystems. Also, updated NOAA's Resource Guide for Teachers of Marine Science is available 
for download. 



NOAA Publk: Affairs - http-.//www.noaa.gov/public-affalrs. All NOAA and NMFS related Press Releases and links to 
other NOAA material available to the public. If you would like these releases through electronic mail rather than fax, send 
e-mail to jslaff@hq.noaa.gov. 



160 



SERVICES 

SEA GRANT MARINE ADVISORY SERVICE 



The Office of Sea Grant is a major program element of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration. The National Sea Grant College Program is funded jointly by the Federal 
Government and colleges or universities. Sea Grant's Marine Advisory Service offers a broad 
range of information to recreational and commercial fishermen, fish processors, and others 
concerning the Nation's fisheries. The following program leaders, listed alphabetically 
by State, can provide information on Sea Grant activities: 



William Hosking, Coordinator 
Alabama Sea Grant Extension 
Auburn University Marine 

Extension & Research Center 
4170 Commander's Drive 
Mobile, AL 36615 
(334) 438-5690 FAX: 438-5670 

Donald E. Kramer, Leader 

Alaska Sea Grant College Program 

Marine Advisory Program 

2221 East Northern Lights #110 

Anchorage, AK 99508 

(907) 274-9691 FAX: 277-5242 

Christopher M. DeWees, 

Coordinator 
Sea Grant Extension Program 
Department of Wildlife 

and Fisheries 
Univ. of CA - Davis 
Davis, CA 95616 
(916) 752-1497 FAX: 752-4154 

Susan Yoder, MAS Leader 
use Sea Grant Program 
Hancock Institute of Marine 

Studies, University Park 
Los Angeles, CA 90089 
(213) 740-1964 FAX: 740-5936 

Nancy Balcom, Interim MAS Leader 
Sea Grant Marine Advisory 

Program, Univ. of Connecticut 
1084 Shennecossett Road 
Groton, CT 06340 
(860) 405-9107 FAX: 485-9109 

Kent Price, MAS Leader 
Delaware Sea Grant College Prog. 
Marine Advisory Service 
700 Pilottown Road 
Lewes, DE 19958 
(302) 645-4256 FAX: 645-4007 

Marion L. Clarke, Leader 
Florida Sea Grant Extension 
Univ. of FL - Bldg. 803 
P.O. Box 110405 
Gainesville, FL 32611 
(352) 392-1837 FAX: 392-5113 

Keith Gates, MAS Leader 
Marine Extension Service 
715 Bay Street 
Brunswick, GA 31520 
(912) 264-7268 FAX: 264-7312 

Bruce J. Miller, Assoc. Dir. 
Director of Extension/Pacific 
Programs, Sea Grant Extension 
Service, Univ. of HA 
1000 Pope Road, MSB 227 
Honolulu, HI 96822 
(808) 956-8645 FAX: 956-2858 



Brian Miller, MAS Leader 
Forestry & Natural Resources 
Purdue Univ. - Forestry Bldg. 
West Lafayette, IN 47907 
(317) 494-3586 FAX: 494-0409 



Michael Liffman, Assist. Dir. 
Lousiana Sea Grant College 

Program, LA State Univ. 
136 Wetland Resources Building 
Baton Rouge, LA 70803 
(504) 388-6290 FAX: 388-6331 

Ron Beard, Interim MAS Leader 
ME/NH Sea Grant College Program 
21 Coburn Hall, Univ. Of ME 
Orono, ME 04469 
(207) 581-1440 FAX: 581-1423 

Douglas Lipton, MAS Leader 
Cooperative Extension Service 
2218B Symons Hall - Univ. of MD 
College Park, MD 20742 
(301) 405-1280 FAX: 314-9032 

Cliff Goudey, MAS Leader 

MIT Sea Grant College Program 

E38-324/Kendall Square 

292 Main Street 

Cambridge, MA 02139 

(617) 253-7079 FAX: 258-5730 



Dale Leavitt, MAS Leader 

WHOI Sea Grant Program 

Mail Stop #2, Coastal Research Lab. 

Woods Hole Oceanographic 

Institute 
Woods Hole, MA 02543 
(508) 289-2997 FAX: 457-2172 



John Schwartz, MAS Leader 
Michigan Sea Grant College Prog. 
Michigan State University 
334 Natural Resource Building 
East Lansing, MI 48824 
(517) 355-9637 FAX: 353-6496 



Jeffery Gunderson, MAS Leader 
Minnesota Sea Grant 
Univ. of MN - Duluth 
208 Washburn Hall 
Duluth, MN 55812 
(218) 726-8715 FAX: 726-6556 



David C. Veal, MAS Leader 

MS Sea Grant Advisory Service 

Coastal Research/Extension Center 

2710 Beach Blvd., Suite 1-E 

Biloxi, MS 39531 

(601) 338-4710 FAX: 388-1375 



SERVICES 
SEA GRANT MARINE ADVISORY SERVICE 



161 



Brian E. Doyle, MAS Leader 
Sea Grant College Program 
Univ. of NH - Kingman Farm 
Durham, NH 03824 
(603) 749-1565 FAX: 743-3997 

Alex Wypyszinski, MAS Leader 
New Jersey Sea Grant College 

Program, Cook College 
P.O. Box 231 

New Brunswick, NJ 08903 
(908) 932-9636 ext : 221 

FAX: (908) 932-6557 

Dale R. Baker, MAS Leader 

New York Sea Grant 

Cornell University 

340 Roberts Hall 

Ithaca, NY 14853 

(607) 255-2832 FAX: 255-2812 



Leroy J. Hushak, Assoc. Dir. 

and MAS Leader 
Ohio State University 
2120 Fyffe Rd. 
Columbus, OH 43210 
(614) 292-3548 FAX: 292-7710 



James Murray, MAS Leader 
NC State Univ. 
105 1911 Building 
Box 8605 

Raleigh, NC 27695 
(919) 515-2454 FAX 515-7095 



Jay Rasmussen, Program Leader 
Oregon Extension Sea Grant 
Hatfield Marine Science Center 
2030 S. Marine Science Drive 
Newport, OR 97365 
(541) 867-0368 FAX: 867-0369 



Javier Velez-Arocho, MAS Leader 
Sea Grant College Program 
Univ. of Puerto Rico 



P.O. Box 5000 
Mayaguez, PR 00681 
(787) 832-8045 FAX: 265-2880 

Kathy Castro, Coordinator 

Rhode Island Sea Grant MAS 
Graduate School of Oceanography 
University of RI 
South Ferry Road 
Narragansett, RI 02882 
(401) 874-6800 FAX: 789-8340 



Bob Bacon, MAS Leader 
South Carolina Sea Grant 
Marine Extension Program 
287 Meeting Street 
Charleston, SC 29401 

(803) 727-2075 FAX: 727-2080 

Mike Hightower, 

Program Cordinator 
Texas Marine Advisory Service 
Sea Grant College Program 
1716 Briarcrest Drive, Suite 702 
Bryan, TX 77802 
(409) 845-7524 FAX: 845-7525 

Wm. D. DuPaul, MAP Coordinator 
Virginia Sea Grant College Prog. 
Marine Advisory Service 
Virginia Inst, of Marine Science 
Gloucester Point, VA 23062 

(804) 642-7164 FAX: 642-7161 



Michael S. Spranger, MAS Leader 

Washington Sea Grant HG-30 

University of WA 

3716 Brooklyn Avenue, N.E. 

Seattle, WA 98105 

(206) 685-9291 FAX: 685-0380 

Allen H. Miller, MAS Leader 
Wisconsin Sea Grant Institute 
Univ. of WI., Madison Campus 
1800 University Avenue 
Madison, WI 53705 
(608) 262-0644 FAX: 263-2063 



National Sea Grant Depository 
(Clearing House for all Sea Grant Publications) 

Pell Library 
University of Rhode Island 

Bay Campus 
Narragansett, RI 02882 
PHONE: 401-874^114 
FAX: 874-6160 



162 



SERVICES 

TRADE AND INDUSTRY SERVICES 



The National Marine Fisheries Service conducts activities designed to improve the competitive- 
ness of the U.S. fishing industry in domestic and world markets and to enhance the safety and 
quality of U.S. seafood products. Programs include: (1) international trade negotiations; (2) 
financial assistance on the form of loan guarantees, insurance programs, a capital construction 
fund, and research and development grants; (3) administration of fishery product inspection 
and grading, and product standard programs; (4) research and development on product safety, 
quality, and use; and (5) advise to the U.S. Department of Agriculture on the use of its 
Surplus Commodity Program and export financing programs for fishery products. 



wEjnQmPTgB.g • 



BEGIOSAL OFFICES: 



COntinuod 



Director, Industry and Trade 

Program 
1315 East-West Highway 
Silver Spring, MD 20910 
PHONE: (301) 713-2379 
FAX: (301) 713-2384 

Chief, Financial Services Division 
1315 East-West Highway 
Silver Spring, MD 20910 
Address same as above 
Phone: (301) 713-2390 
FAX: (301) 713-1306 

Chief, Inspection Services Division 
Address same as above 
Phone: (1-800-713-1668) 
FAX: (301) 713-1081 



SEGIOSAL OFFICES: 



Chief, Northeast Inspection Branch 
1 Blackburn Drive 
Gloucester, MA 01930 
Phone: (508) 281-9292 
FAX: (508) 281-9134 

Chief, Fisheries Analysis Division 
Address same as above 
Phone: (508) 281-9232 
FAX: (508) 281-9333 

Chief, Financial Services Branch 
Address same as above 
Phone: (508) 281-9203 
FAX: (508) 281-9375 

Chief, Southeast Inspection Branch 
9721 Executive Center Drive, North 
St. Petersburg, FL 33702 
Phone: (813) 570-5383 
FAX: (813) 570-5387 

Chief, Economics and Trade 

Analysis Division 
Address same as above 
Phone: (813) 570-5335 
FAX: (813) 570-5300 

Chief, Financial Services Branch 
Address same as above 
Phone: (813) 570-5335 
FAX: (813) 570-5300 

Chief, Western Inspection Branch 
5600 Rlckenbacker Road, Bldg. 7 
Bell, CA 90201 
Phone: (213) 526-7412 
FAX: (213) 526-7417 



Chief, Fisheries Management Division 
501 W. Ocean Blvd., Suite 4200 
Long Beach, CA 90802 
Phone: (310) 980-4030 
FAX: (310) 980-4047 

International Trade Specialist 
Development Section 
Address same as above 
Phone: (562) 980-4038 
FAX: (562) 980-4047 

Chief, Trade and Industry 

Services Division 
7600 Sand Point Way N.E. 
BIN C15700 (Building 1) 
Seattle, WA 98115 
Phone: (206) 526-6117 
FAX: (206) 526-6544 

Chief, Financial Services Branch 

(Pacific Coast Area) 
Address same as above 
Phone: (206) 526-6122 
FAX: (206) 526-6306 

Fisheries Development Specialist 

International Affairs Officer 
709 West 9th St., 4th Floor 
P.O. Box 21668 
Juneau, AK 99802 
Phone: (907) 586-7224 
FAX: (907) 586-7249 



OVERSEAS: 



Eric Fleury, Commercial Specialist 

Commercial Section 

U.S. Embassy 

2 Avenue Gabriel 

75382 Paris Cedex 08 

FRANCE 

Phone: 011-33-1-43-12-20-04 

FAX: 011-33-1-43-12-21-72 

U.S. Mission to the European Union 

40 Blvd. du Regent 

B-1000 Brussels 

BELGIUM 

Phone: 011-32-2-508-2769 

FAX: 011-32-2-513-1228 

Tom Asakawa, Commercial Specialist 

Commercial Section 

1-10-5 Akasaka 

Minato-ku, TOKYO 107 

JAPAN 

Phone: 011-81-3-3224-5077 

FAX: 011-81-3-3589-4235 



GLOSSARY 



163 



ANADROMOUS SPECIES . These are species of fish that 
nxrture in ttie ocean, and ttien ascend streams to spawn 
in freshwater, in the Magnuson Act, these species 
inciude, but are not iimited to, Atlantic and Pacific 
salmons, steeihead trout, and striped txiss. See 42 FR 
60682, Nov. 28, 1977. 

ANALOG PRODUCTS . These inciude imitation and 
simulated crab, lobster, shrimp, scallops, and other Ush 
and shellfish products fabricated fl'om processed fish 
meat (such as surimi). 



CANNED FISHERY PRODUCTS . Fish, shellfish, or other 
aquatic animals packed in cans, or other containers, 
which are hermetically sealed and heat-sterilized. 
Canned fishery products may inciude milk, vegetables, or 
other products. Most, but not all, canned fishery 
products can be stored at room temperature for an 
indefinite time without spoiling. 

COMMERCIAL FISHERMAN . An individual who derives 
income from catching and selling living resources taken 
fi-om inland or marine waters. 



AQUACULTURE. The farming of aquatic organisms In 
rrxarine, brackish or ft'eshwater. Farming implies private or 
corporate ownership of the organism and enhancement 
of productton by stocking, feeding, providing protection 
from predators or other management measures. 
Aquacuiture production is reported as the weight and 
value of cultured organisms at their point of final sale. 

BAnER-COATED FISH PRODUCTS . Sticks and portions or 
other forms of fish or shellfish coated with a batter 
containing a leavening agent and mixture of cereal 
products, flavoring, and other ingredients, and partially 
cooked in hot oil a short time to expand and set the 
batter, 

BOAT. OTHER . Commercial fishing craft not powered by 
a motor, e.g., rowboat or sailboat, having a capacity of 
less ttnan 5 net tons. See motorboat. 

BREADED FISH PRODUCTS . Sticks and portions or other 
forms of fish or shellfish coated with a non-leavened 
mixtijre containing cereal products, flavorings, and otiner 
ingredients. Breaded products are sold raw or partially 
cooked. 

BREADED SHRIMP . Peeled shrimp coated with breading. 
The product rrxay be identified as fantail (butterfly) and 
round, wtih or witi^out tail fins and last shell segment; also 
knovi/n as portions, sticks, steaks, etc., when prepared 
fl'om a composite unit of two or more shrimp pieces 
whole shrimp or a combination of both without fins or 
shells. 



BUnERFLY FILLET Two skin-on fillets of a flsh joined 
together by the belly skin. See fillets. 



CONSUMPTION OF EDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS . Estimated 
amount of commercially landed fish, shellfish, and oti^er 
aquatic animals consumed by the civilian population of 
the United States. Estirrxates are on an edible-weight 
basis and have been adjusted for beginning and ending 
inventories of edible flshery products. Consumption 
includes U.S. production of fishery products fl'om boVn 
domestically caught and imported flsh, shellflsh, other 
edible aquatic plants, animals, and Imported products 
and excludes exports and purchases by Vne U.S. Armed 
Forces. 

CONTINENTAL SHELF FISHERY RESOURCES . These are living 
organisms of any sedentary species ti^at at Vne 
harvestable stage are etther (a) immobile on or under the 
seabed, (b) unable to move except in instant physical 
contact with ttie seabed or subsoil of the continental 
shelf. The Magnuson Act now lists them as certain 
abalones, surf clam and ocean quahog, queen conch, 
Atiantic deep-sea red crab, dungeness crab, stone crab, 
king crabs, snow (tanner) crabs, American lobster, 
certain corals, and sponges. 

CMR EP FIS HE RY PROPUCTS . Products preserved by drying, 
pickling, salting, or smoking; not including canned, 
frozen, irradiated, or pasteurized products. Dried 
products are cured by sun or air-drying; pickled or salted 
products are ttiose products preserved by applying salt, 
or by pickling (immersing in brine or in a vinegar or otiier 
preservative solution); smoked products are cured wltii 
snnoke or a combination of smoking and drying or salting. 

DEFLATED VALUE . The deflated values referred to In this 
document are calculated with tine Gross Domestic 
Products Implicit Price Deflator. The Ixise year for this 
index is 1987. 



164 



GLOSSARY 



EDIBi£ WEIGHT . The weight of a seafood Item exclusive of 
bones, offal, etc. 

EEZ . See U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone. 



EUROPEAN UNION . Belgium and Luxembourg, Denmark, 
Federal Republic of Germany, Greece, France, Ireland, 
Italy. Nettierlands, Portugal, Spain, and United Kingdom. 
This was formerly known as European Economic 
Community (EEC). 

EXPORT VALUE . The value reported is generally 
equivalent to f.a.s. (free alongside ship) value at the U.S. 
port of export, based on the transaction price, including 
inland freight, insurance, and other charges incurred in 
pkjcing the merchandise abngside the carrier at the U.S. 
port of exportation. The value excludes the cost of 
loading, freight, insurance and other charges or 
transportation cost beyond the port of exportation. 

EXPORT WEIGHT . The weight of Individual products as 
exported, i.e., fillets, steaks, whole, breaded, etc. 
Includes both domestic and foreign re-exports data. 

EXVESSEL PRICE . Price received by the harvester for fish, 
shellfish, and other aquatic plants and animals. 

FISH BLOCKS . Regular fish blocks are flrozen blocks or 
slabs of fillets or pieces of fillets cut or sliced from fish. 
Minced fish blocks are frozen blocks or slabs of minced 
flesh produced by a meat and bone separating 
rrxachine. 

FISH FILLETS . The sides of fish that are either skinned or 
have the skin on, cut lengthwise from tt^e backbone. 
Most types of fillets are boneless or virtually boneless; 
some may be labeled as "boneless fillets." 

FISH MEAL . A hIgh-protein anlrrxal feed supplement 
rrade by cooking, pressing, drying, and grinding fish or 
shellfish. 

FISH OIL . An oil extracted fi'om body (body oil) or liver 
(liver oil) of fish and marine rrxamrrxals; mostly a byproduct 
of fish meal production. 

FISH PORTION . A piece of fish fiesh that is generally of 
uniform size with thickness of 3/8 of an inch or rrrare and 



differs from a fish stick in being wider or of a different 
shape. A fish portion Is generally cut from a fish block. 

FISH SOLUBLES . A water-soluble protein byproduct of fish 
meal producflon. Fish solubles are generally condensed 
to 50 fjercent solids and mari<eted as "condensed fish 
solubles." 

FISH STEAK . A cross-section slice cut from a large dressed 
fish. A steak Is usually about 3/4 of an inch thick. 

FISH STICK . Art elongated piece of breaded fish fiesh 
weighing not less flnan 3/4 of an ounce and not more 
than 1-1/2 ounces with the largest dimension at least 
three flmes that of the next largest dimension . A fish slick 
Is generally cut from a fish block. 

FISHERY MANAG EMENT PLAN (FMP). A plan developed by 
a Regional Fishery Management Council, or the 
Secretary of Commerce under certain circumstances, to 
rrxanage a fishery resource In the U.S. EEZ pursuant to the 
MFCMA (Magnuson Act). 

FISHING CRAF T. COMMERCIAL. Boats and vessels 
engaged In capturing fish, shellfish, and other aquatic 
plants and animals for sale. 

FULL-TIME COMMERCIAL FISHERMAN . An individual who 
receives nnore ttnan 50 percent of their annual income 
from commerctal fishing activities, including port activity, 
such as vessel repair and re-rigging. 

GROUNDFISH . Broadly, Ash that ore caught on or near 
the sea floor. The term includes a wide variety of 
bottomfishes, rockfishes, and flatfishes. However, NMFS 
sometimes uses the tetm in a narrower sense, in "Fisheries 
of the United States," ttie term applies to the following 
specles-Atiantic and Pacific: cod, hake, ocean perch, 
and pollock; cusk; and haddock. 



IMPORT VALUE . Value of imports as appraised by the U.S. 
Customs Service according to the Tariff Act of 1930, as 
amended, it may be based on foreign mari<et value, 
constructed value, American selling price, etc. it 
generally represents a value in a foreign country, and 
therefore excludes U.S. import duties, fl'eight, insurance, 
and other charges incurred in bringing ttie merchandise 
to the United States. 



GLOSSARY 



165 



IMPORT WEIGHT . The weights of individual products as 
received, i.e., fillets, steaks, whole, headed, etc. 



MDUSTRIAL FISHERY PRODUCTS . Items processed from 
fish, shellfish, or other aquatic plants and animals that are not 
consumed directly by humans. These items contain products 
from seaweeds, fish meal, fish oils, fish solubles, pearl essence, 
shark and other aquatic animal skins, and shells. 

WTERNAL WATER PROCESSING nWPs) . An operation in 
which a foreign vessel is authorized by the governor of a state 
to receive and process fish in the internal waters of a state. 
The Magnuson Act refers to internal waters as all waters within 
the boundaries of a state except those seaward of the baseline 
from which the territorial sea is measured. 

JOINT VE^^^URE ■ An operation authorized under the 
MFCMA (Magnuson Act) in which a foreign vessel is 
authorized to receive fish from U.S. fishermen in the U.S. 
EEZ. The fish received from the U.S. vessel are part of the 
U.S. harvest 

LANDtlGS. COMMERCIAL . Quantities of fish, shellfish, and 
other aquatic plants and animals brought ashore and sold. 
Landings of fish may be in terms of round (live) weight or 
dressed weight. Landings of crustaceans are generally on a 
live-weight basis except for shrimp which may be on a heads- 
on or heads-off basis. Mollusks are generally landed with the 
shell on, but for some species only the meats are landed, such 
as sea scallops. Data for all mollusks are published on a meat- 
weight basis. 



MAQNUSON nsHERY conservation AND 

MANAGEMENT ACT . Pubic Law 94-265, as amended. The 
Magnuson Act provides a national program for the 
conservation and management of fisheries to albw for an 
optimum yield (OY) on a continuing basis and to realize the full 
potential of the Nation's fishery resources. It established the 
U.S. Exclusive Economics Zone (EEZ) (formerly the FCZ - 
Fishery Conservation Zone) and a means to control foreign and 
certain domestic fisheries through PMPs and FMPs. Within 
the U.S. EEZ, the United States has exclusive management 
authority over fish (meaning finfish, mollusks, crustaceans, and 
all other forms of marineanimal and plant life other than marine 
mammals, birds, and highly migratory species of tuna). The 
Magnuson Act provides further exclusive management 
authority beyond the U.S. EEZ for all continental shelf fishery 
resources and all anadromous species throughout the 
migratory range of each such species, except during the time 



they are found within any foreign nation's territorial sea or 
fishery conservation zone (or the equivalent), to the extent that 
such a sea or zone is recognized by the United States. 

MARINE RECREATIONAL HSHING Fishing for pleasure, 
amusement, relaxation, or home consumption. 

MARINE REC REATIONAL CATCH . Quantities of finfish, 
shellfish and other living aquatic organisms caught, but not 
necessarily brought ashore, by marine recreational fisherman. 

MARIE RECREATIONAL FISHERMEN Those people who 
fish in marine waters primarily for recreational purposes. Their 
catch is primarily for home consumption, although occasionally 
a part or all of their catch may be sold and enter commercial 
channels. This definition is used in the NMFS Marine 
Recreational Rshery Statistics Sun/ey, and is not intended to 
represent a NMFS policy on the sale of angler-caught fish. 

MAXMUM SUSTAHABLE YIELD (MSY) MSY from a fishery 
is the largest annual catch or yield in terms of weight of fish 
caught by both commercial and recreational fishermen that can 
be taken continuously from a stock under existing 
environmental conditions. A determination of MSY, which 
should be an estimate based upon the best scientific 
information available, is a biological measure necessary in the 
development of optimum yield. 

METRIC TONS . A measure of weight equal to 1,000 
kilograms, 0.984 long tons, 1.1023 short tons, or 2,204.6 
pounds. 

MOTORBOAT . A motor-driven commercial fishing craft having 
a capacity of less than 5 net tons, or not officially documented 
by the Coast Guard. See "boat, other." 

NORTHWEST ATLANTIC FI SHERIES ORGANIZATION 

(NAFO). This convention, which entered into force January 1 , 
1 979, replaces ICNAF. NAFQ provides a fomm for continued 
multilateral scientific research and investigation of fishery 
resources that occur beyond the limits of coastal nations' 
fishery jurisdiction in the northwest Atlantic, and will ensure 
consistency between NAFO management measures in this 
area and those adopted by the coastal nations within the limits 
of their fishery jurisdiction. 

OPTIWUM YIELD (OY) . In the MFCMA (Magnuson Act), OY 
with respect to the yield from a fishery, is the amount of fish that 
(1) will provide the greatest overall benefit to the United States, 
with particular reference to food production and recreational 
opportunities; and (2) is prescribed as such on the basis of 



166 



GLOSSARY 



maximum sustainable yield from such fishery, as modified by 
any relevant ecological, economic, or social factors. 

PACKAGED FISH . A term used in NMFS publications prior to 
1 972 to designate fresh or frozen raw fish fillets and steaks. 



SURill . Minced fish meat (usually Alaska pollock) which has 
been washed to remove fat and undesirable matters (such as 
blood, pigments, and odorous substances), and mixed with 
cryoprotectants, such as sugar and/or sorbitol, for a good 
frozen shelf life. 



PART-TME COMMERCIAL FISHERMAN . An Individual who 
receives less than 50 percent of their annual income from 
commercial fishing activities. 



PER CAPPTA CONSUMPTION . Consumption of edible fishery 
products in the United States divided by the total civilian 
population. In calculating annual per capita consumption, 
estimates of the civiian resident population of the United States 
on July 1 of each year are used. These estimates are taken 
from current population reports, series P-25, published by the 
U.S. Bureau of the Census. 



PER CAPfTA USE . The use of all fishery products, both edible 
and nonedible, in the United States divided by the total 
population of the United States. 



PREUMINARY RSHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN fPMP) 

The Secretary of Commerce prepares a PMP whenever a 
foreign nation with which the United States has made a 
Goveming Intemational Rshery Agreement (GIFA) submits an 
appication to fish In a fishery not managed by an FMP. A PMP 
is replaced by an FMP as soon as the latter is implemented. A 
PMP applies only to foreign fishing. 



RE-EXPORTS . Re-exports are commodities which have 
entered the U.S. as imports and are subsequently exported in 
substantially the same condition as when originally imported. 



TOTAL ALLOWABLE LEVEL OF FOREI GN nSHING 
(TALFF) . he TALFF, if any, with respect to any fishery subject 
to the exclusive fishery management authority of the United 
States, is that portion of the optimum yield of such fishery which 
will not be harvested by vessels of the United States, as 
determined by provisions of the MFCMA. 

U.S. EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE fEEZ) . The MFCMA 
(Magnuson Act) defines this zone as contiguous to the 
territorial sea of the United States and extending seaward 200 
nautical miles measured from the baseline from which the 
territorial sea is measured. This was formerly referred to as the 
FCZ (Fishery Conservation Zone). 

US.-FLAG VESSEL LANDINGS . Includes landings by all 
U.S. fishing vessels regardless of where landed as opposed to 
landings at ports in the 50 United States. These 
includelandings at foreign ports, U.S. territories, and foreign 
vessels in the U.S. FCZ under joint venture agreements. U.S. 
law prohibits vessels constructed or registered in foreign 
countries to land fish catches at U.S. ports. 

U.S. TERRITORIAL SEA . A zone extending 3 nautical miles 
from shore for all states except Texas and the Gulf Coast of 
Florida where the seaward boundary is 3 marine leagues (9 
nautical miles). 

USE OF FISHERY PRODUCTS . Estimated disappearance of 
the total supply of fishery products, both edible and nonedible, 
on a round-weight basis without considering beginning or 
ending stocks, exports, military purchases, or shipments to 
U.S. territories. 



RETAIL PRICE . The price of fish and shellfish sold to the final 
consumer by food stores and other retail outlets. 



ROUND (LIVE) WEIGHT . The weight of fish, shellfish, or other 
aquatic plants and animals as taken from the water; the 
complete or full weight as caught. The tables on world catch 
found in this publication include, in the case of mollusks, the 
weight of both the shells and the meats, whereas the tables on 
U.S. landings include only the weight of the meats. 



VESSEL . A commercial fishing craft having a capacity of 5 net 
tons or more. These craft are either enrolled or documented by 
the U.S. Coast Guard and have an official number assigned by 
that agency. 



WHOLESALE HSH AND SHE LLHSH PRICES Those 
prices received at principal fishery mari<ets by primary 
wholesalers (processors, importers, and brokers) for customary 
quantities, free on board (f.o.b.) warehouse. 



STATISTICAL SUBJECT INDEX 

(Reference gives page number) 



167 



AQUACULTURE 

Production 18 

CLAMS 

Aquaculture, 18 
Canned, 91 
Exports, 105, 120 
Frozen holdings, 94 
Imports, 97, 1 20 
Landings, 2, 8, 12, 120 
Supply, 120 
Value of landings, 2, 8, 12 

COLD STORAGE 

Holdings, monthly, 94 

CONSUMPTION 

Canned, 124, 126 
Cured, 124 

Fillets and steaks, 1 26 
Fresh and frozen, 124 
Per capita, by country, 1 28 
Per capita, U.S., 124 
Per capita, use, 1 27 
Salmon, canned, 126 
Sardines, canned, 126 
Shellfish, canned, 126 
Shrimp, 126 

Sticks and portions, 1 26 
Tuna, canned, 126 



CR ABS 

Canned, 91,118 

Exports, 105, 110, 118 

Frozen holdings, 94 

Imports, 97, 118 

Landings, 2, 8, 12, 15, 16 

Supply, 118 

Value of landings, 2, 8, 12, 15, 16 

World catch, 86 

CRAFT. nSHING 

Number, by region and 
state, 133 

DISPOSITION OF LANDINGS 

United States, 3 
World, 86 

DUTIES 

Collected, 98 



EMPLOYMENT 

Processors and wholsalers, 135 
Region and State, 135 

EXPOR TS 

All fishery products, 1 05 
Crabs, 105, 110 
Crabmeat, 105, 110 
Continent and country, by, 1 07 
Cured, 1 05 
Edible, by years, 1 06 
Fishmeal, 105, 110, 122 
Herring, 105 

Nonedible, by years, 1 06 
Oils, 105, 110, 122 
Principal items, 1 05 
Salmon, canned, 105, 109, 117 
Salmon, whole or eviscerated, 

105,109 

Sardines, canned, 1 05, 1 1 7 
Shrimp, canned, 105, 108, 121 
Shrimp, domestic and foreign 

products, 1 08, 1 21 
Shrimp, fresh and frozen, 

105,108 

Snow (tanner) crab, 118 
Value, by years, 1 06 
Volume, by years, 1 06 
World, by country, 87 



FLOUNDERS 

Fillets, 90 

Frozen holdings, 94 
Landings, 1,6,10 
Value of landings, 1 , 6, 10 

GROUNDRSH RLLETS AND STEAKS 

Exports, 1 05 
Fillets, supply, 114 
Imports, 97, 1 00 

HALIBUT 

Fillets and steaks, 90 
Frozen holdings, 94 
Landings, 1,6, 10 
Value of landings, 1, 6, 10 

HERRING. SEA 

Canned (sardines), 91 
Consumption (sardines), per 
capita, 1 26 



HERRING. SEA -Continued 

Landings, 1, 6, 10 
Exports (sardines), 105, 110 
Imports (sardines), 97 
Value of landings, 1 , 6, 10 
World catch, 86 



IMPORTS 

All fishery products, 97, 98 
Blocks and slabs, 97, 1 00 
Clams, canned, 97 
Continent and country, by, 99 
Crabmeat, canned, fresh and 
frozen, 97, 118 
Cured, 97 
Duties collected, 98 
Edible, 97, 98,99, 114, 115 
Fillets, groundfish, 97, 1 00 
Fillets, other than groundfish 
and ocean perch, 97 
Finfish, 114 

Groundfish, 97, 100, 115 
Herring, canned, 97 
Industrial, 113, 114 
Lobsters, canned, 97 
Lobsters, fresh and frozen, 97 
Meal and scrap, 97, 103 
Nonedible, 97, 98, 99 
Oils, 97, 120 
Oysters, canned, 97 
Principal items, 97 
Quota, canned tuna, not in 
oil, 101 

Salmon, canned, 97, 1 1 7 
Salmon, fresh and frozen, 97 
Sardines, canned, 97, 1 1 7 
Scallop meats, 97, 1 20 
Shellfish, 114 
Shrimp, by country, 1 02 
Shrimp, by products, 1 03 
Tuna, canned, 97, 1 01 , 1 1 7 
Tuna, fresh and frozen, 97, 116 
Value, by years, 98 
Volume, by year, 98 
World, by country, 87 



INSPECTION 

Establishments and amount 
inspected, 136 



168 



STATISTICAL SUBJECT INDEX 

(Reference gives page number) 



LANDINGS 

Disposition, 3 

Foreign shores, off, 6, 10 

Human food (edible), 3 

Industrial, 3 

Months, by, 3 

Ports, major U.S., 5 

Record year, by States, 4 

Species, 1 , 6, 1 

State and region, current, 4 

Swordflsh, historical by state, 20 

Territory, 14 

U.S. shores, distance from, 6, 10 

World, 83, 84, 85, 86 



LOBSTERS. AMERICAN 

Imports, 97, 119 
Landings, 2, 8, 12, 119 
Supply, 119 
Value of landings, 2, 8, 12 

LOBSTER. SPI NY 

Frozen holdings, 94 

Imports, 97, 119 

Landings,2,8, 12, 15, 16, 119 

Supply, 119 

Value of landings, 2,8,12,15,16 

MACKERELS 

Landings, 1 , 6, 1 

Value of landings, 1, 6, 10 

World catch, 86 

MAGNUSON nSHERY CONSERVATION 
AND MANAGEMENT ACT (MFCMA) 

Fishery Management Plan, 1 39 
Fees, foreign fishing, 1 38 
General description, 138 
Optimum yield by species, 1 41 
Regional Fishery Management 
Councils, 1 40 

MEAL AND SCRAP 

Exports, 105, 110 
Imports, 97, 103 
Landings, disposition, 3 
Mackerel, 93 
Menhaden, 93 
Production, U.S., 93 
Supply, 122 
Tuna, 93 
World, disposition, 86 



MENHADEN 

Landings, 1,7,11 

Meal, 93 

Oil, 93 

Value of landings, 1 , 7, 1 1 



i2IL 

Exports, 105, 122 
Imports, 97, 122 
Menhaden, 93 
Production, 93 
Supply, 122 
World, disposition, 86 



OYSTERS 

Aquaculture, 18 

Canned, 91 

Imports, 97, 120 

Landings, 2, 8, 12, 15, 16 

Supply, 120 

Value of landings, 2, 8, 12, 15, 16 

World catch, 86 

PLANTS AND HRMS 

Employment, 135 

Processors and wholesalers, 1 35 

PRICES 

Exvessel index, 1 31 



PROCESSING 

Animal food and bait, canned, 

89, 91 , 92 

Canned products, 89, 91 , 92 
Canned, by year, 92 
Clams, canned 91 
Crabs, canned, 91, 118 
Employment in, 135 
Fillets and steaks, fresh 

and frozen, 90 
Frozen holdings, 94 
Industrial products, 93 
Meal, oil, 89, 93 
Oysters, canned, 91 
Plants, number of, 135 
Salmon canned, 91 
Sardines, canned, 91 
Shrimp, canned, 91 
Sticks, portions, and breaded 

shrimp, 89 



RECREATIONAL RSHERIES. 

Atlantic & Gulf Statistics: 

Catch (number) by species and 
sub-region, 34 - 47 

Catch (weight) by species and 
sub-region, 48 - 61 

Catch (number) by species and 
area, 64 - 70 

Catch (weight) by species and 
area, 71 - 77 

Participants (number) by sub- 
region and state, 29 - 30 

Fishing trips (number) by sub- 
region and state, 31 - 32 

Pacific Staitistics: 

Catch(number) by species, 62 

Catch (weight) by species, 63 

Catch (number) by species and 
fishing area, 78 - 79 

Catch (weight) by species and 
fishing area, 80-81 

Participants (number) by sub- 
region and state, 33 

Fishing trips (number) by sub- 
region and state, 33 

U.S., Total: 
Participants by coast, 33 
Fishing trips by coast, 33 
Sampling coverage, 28 



SALMON 

Aquaculture, 18 
Canned, 91. 117 
Consumption, per capita, 126 
Exports, 105, 109 
Fillets and steaks, 90 
Frozen holdings, 94 
Imports, 97 
Landings, 1,7,11 
Supply, canned, 117 
Value of landings, 1,7,11 
World catch, 86 



SARDINES 

Canned, 91, 117 
Consumption, per capita, 126 
Exports, 105, 117 
Imports, 97, 117 
Supply, Cetnned, 117 
World catch, 86 



STATISTICAL SUBJECT INDEX 

(Reference gives page number) 



169 



SCALLOPS 

Exports, 105, 120 
Imports, 97, 120 
Landings, 2, 9, 13 
Supply, 1 20 

Value of landings, 2, 9, 13 
World catch, 86 



SUBUflE 

Aquaculture, 18 
Breaded, 89 
Canned, 91, 97, 121 
Consumption, per capita, 1 26 
Exports, 105, 108, 121 
Frozen holdings, 94 
Imports, 97, 102, 103, 121 
Landings, head-off, 121 
Landings, head-on, 2, 9, 13, 16 
Supply, canned, 121 
Supply, total, 121 
Value of landings, 2, 9, 13, 16 
Worid catch, 86 



SUPPLY 

All fishery products, 1 13, 1 14 

Blocks, 115 

Clam meats, 1 20 

Crabs, 118 

Crabmeat, 118 

Edible fishery products, 1 13, 1 14 

Rllets and steaks, all, 115 

Rllets & steaks, groundfish, 1 15 

Rnfish, 114 

Industrial products, 1 13, 1 14 

Lobsters, American, 1 19 

Lobsters, spiny, 119 

Meal, 122 

Meal and solubles, 122 

Oils, 122 

Oysters, 1 20 

Salmon, canned, 117 

Sardines, canned, 1 1 7 

Scallop meats, 1 20 



SUPPLY- Continued 

Shellfish, 114 
Shrimp, 121 
Tuna, 116 

SWORDFISH 

Historical landing by state, 20 

Landings, 2, 8, 1 1 

Value of landings, 2, 8, 1 1 



TUNA 

Canned, 91 , 97, 101 
Consumption, per capita, 126 

Exports, 105 

Imports, 97, 101, 116 

Landings, 2, 8, 12, 14, 16, 116 

Meal, 93 

Quota, imports, canned, 101 

Supply, canned, 1 1 7 

Value of landings, 2, 8, 12, 14, 16 

World catch, 86 

USE 

Per capita, 1 27 
Landings, by month, 3 
Valued added, 132 

wulung 

Frozen holdings, 94 

Landings, 2, 8, 12 

Value of landings, 2, 8, 1 2 



WORLD FISHERIFS 

Catch by countries, 84 
Catch by continents, 85 
Catch by major fishing 

areas, 85 
Catch by species groups, 86 
Catch by years, 83 
Disposition, 86 

Imports and exports value, 87 
Per capita consumption, by 

country, 128 



y^ 




it U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1997 .#418-592/40046 



-NOTES- 



Federal Inspection Marks for Fishery Products 

NATIONAL FISHERY PRODUCTS INSPECTION PROGRAM. The U.S. Department of Commerce (USDC), National Marine Fisheries 
Service, a part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, conducts a voluntaty seafood inspection program on a fee-for-service 
basis. A HACCP-based service is also available. Services provided by the program include vessel and plant sanitation, product inspection 
and grading, label reviews, product specificalion reviews, laboratory analyses, training, education and information. Inspection and certification 
services are available nationwide and in U.S. territories for all interested parties. Consultative services are provided In foreign countries. 
Inspection and certification services are also provided for imported and exported products. The USDC Seafood Inspection Division also 
prcMdes HACCP training, plan development, implementation assistance, and verification service to industry for the purpose of demonstrating 
compliance wnth FDA's HACCP rule (21 CFR Parts 123 and 1240) regarding "Procedures for the Safe and Sanitary Processing and Importing 
of Fish and Rshery Products" which will be implemented December 18, 1997. 

USERS OF INSPECTKJN SERVICES. The users of the voluntary seafood inspection service include vessel owners, processors, distributors, 
brokers, retailers, food service operators, exporters, importers, and those who have a financial interest in buying and selling seafood products. 
The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends that USDC inspected products be purchased for its food feeding programs. The USDC 
APPROVED LIST OF FISH ESTABLISHMENTS AND PRODUCTS, published bi-annually, provides a listing of products and participants 
who contract with USDC. 

USDC INSPECTION MARKS. These marks designate the level and the type of inspection performed by the federal inspector. The mari<s 
can be used in advertising and atjeling under the guidelines provided by the Inspecton Services Division and in accordance with federal 
and state regulations regarding advertising and labeling. Products tjearing the USDC official marte have been certified as being safe, 
wrtiolesome, and properly labeled. 

"US GRADE A " MARK. The U.S. GRADE A mark signifies that a product has Iseen processed under federal inspection in an approved 
facility and meets the established level of quality of an existing U.S. grade standard. The U.S. Grade A mark indicates that the product is of 
high quality, uniform in size, practically free from blemishes and defects, in excellent condition and possessing good flavor and odor. 

"PROCESSED UNDER FEDERAL INSPECTION" MARK. The PUFI mark or statement signifies that the product has been inspected in 
an approved factlity and was found to be safe, wholesome and property labeled according to approved specifications or criteria. The language 
within the PUFI mari< has been amended to "Processed Under Federal Inspection" to reflect actual inspection procedures and the regulatory 
requirements for use of the mark. 

"LOT INSPECTED" MARKS. A new LxJt Inspected mark was aeated to replace the existing "Officially Sampled" and "Accepted Per 
Specifications" marie currenfly used on retail labels. The use of ttnis mark meets the needs of both industry and consumers by coveying that 
the products bearing the mari< have been examined by ttie USDC Program. 

"RETAIL" MARK. In response to requests made by industi-y, a new mark has been CTeated for retail or food service establishments. 
Participants qualify for use of the "Retail Mark" by receiving the NMFS HACCP-based service or being under conti^act for sanitation services 
and associated product evaluation. Usage of such a mark will give Uie retail industry the opportunity to advertise on ttneir banners, logos, or 
menus that their facility has been recognized by USDC for proper sanitation and handling of fishery products. 




USDC HACCP MARK. The USDC HACCP-tiased service is available to all interested parties on a fee-for-service basis. Label approval, 
recad keeping and analytical testing are program requirements. An industiy USDC certified employee trained in HACCP principles is also 
required for each facility/site in the program. Compliance ratings determine ft'equency of official visits. Benefits to participants include 
increased conb-ols through a more scientific approach, use of established mari<s, increased efficiency of federal inspection personnel, and 
enhanced consumer confidence. The USDC has made available a HACCP mark and a "tjanner" to distinguish products that have tjeen 
produced under the HACCP-tsased program. The HACCP banner must be used as an attachment to existing inspection grade marks. 
Establishmenls meeting HACCP program requirements may use these marks in conjunction witti promotional material, packaging, point-of- 
sale notices, and menus. 



FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: 



Seafood Inspection Division 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

NOAA/NMFS 

1315 East-West Highway 

Silver Spring, MD 20910 

(301)713-2355 (FAX: 713-1081) 

Internet: littp://seafood.ssp.nmfs.gov/iss/lssue.html 



Current Fishery Statistics No. 9700 



September 1998 




U.S. DEPARTMENT National Oceanic and 

OF COMMERCE Atmosplieric Administration 



National Marine 
Fisheries Service 



*^irEs of ^' 



Current Fishery Statistics No. 9700 

Fisheries 

of the 

United States, 

1997 



Prepared by: 
Fisheries Statistics and Economics Division 

Marl< C. Holliday, Chief 
Barbara K. O'Bannon, Editor 



Silver Spring, l\/ID 
September 1 998 







U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

William Daley, Secretary 

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 

D. James Baker, Undersecretary 

National Marine Fisheries Service 

Holland A. Schmitten, Assistant Administrator 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office 
Washington. D.C. 20402 



PREFACE 



FISHERIES OF THE UNITED STATES. 1997 

This publication is a preliminary report for 1997 
on commercial and recreational fisheries of the United 
States with catches in the U.S. waters and foreign 
Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) waters. This annual 
report provides timely answers to frequently asked 
questions. 

SOURCES OF DATA 

Information in this report came from many 
sources. Field offices of the National Marine Fisheries 
Service (NMFS), in cooperation with various States, 
collected and compiled data on U.S. commercial 
landings and processed fishery products. The NMFS 
Fisheries Statistics and Economics Division in Silver 
Spring, MD, managed the collection and compilation of 
recreational statistics, and tabulated and prepared all 
data for publication. Sources of other data appearing in 
this publication are: U.S. Bureau of the Census, U.S. 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. 
Customs Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. 
Department of Agriculture, and the Food and Agriculture 
Organization (FAQ) of the United Nations. 

PRELIMINARY AND FINAL DATA 

Data on U.S. commercial and recreational 
landings, employment, prices, and production of 
processed products are preliminary for 1 997. Final data 
will be published in other NMFS Current Fishery 
Statistics publications. 

The Fisheries Statistics and Economics Division 
of NMFS takes this opportunity to thank members of 
states, industry, and foreign nations who provided the 
data that made this publication possible. 

Program leaders of the field offices were: 
Gregory Power, New England, Middle Atlantic, and 
Chesapeake; Tony Frank, National Biological Service 
Science Center, Great Lakes States; Nelson Johnson, 
Guy Davenport, and Margot Hightower for the South 
Atlantic and Gulf States; Patricia J. Donley, California 
and Hawaii; John K. Bishop, Oregon and Washington; 
and David Ham, Alaska. 

NOTES 

The time series of U.S. catch by species and 
distance from shore included in this year's "Fisheries 
of the U.S." is estimated by the National Marine 
Fisheries Service. 



As in past issues of this publication, the units of 
quantity and value are defined as follows: U.S. landings 
are shown in round weight (except mollusks which are 
in meat weight), unless otherwise noted; quantities 
shown for U.S. imports and exports are in product 
weight, as reported by the U.S. Bureau of the Census, 
unless otherwise noted; the value of the U.S. domestic 
commercial catch is exvessel (in the Review Section on 
important species actual and deflated exvessel prices 
are shown. The deflated value was computed using the 
Gross Domestic Products Implicit Price Deflator); the 
value for U.S. imports is generally the market value in 
the foreign (exporting) country and, therefore, excludes 
U.S. import duties, freight charges from the foreign 
country to the United States, and insurance; the value 
for exports is generally the value at the U.S. port of 
export, based on the selling price, including inland 
freight, insurance, and other charges. Countries and 
territories shown in the U.S. foreign trade section are 
established for statistical purposes in the Tariff 
Schedules of the United States Annotated (International 
Trade Commission) and reported by the U.S. Bureau of 
the Census. 

SUGGESTIONS 



The Fisheries Statistics and Economics Division 
wishes to provide the kinds of data sought by users of 
fishery statistics, and welcomes any comments or 
suggestions that will improve this publication. 



Address all comments or questions to: 

Fisheries Statistics and Economics 
Division, (F/ST1) 
National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA 
1315 East-West Highway - Rm. 12340 
Silver Spring, MD 20910-3282 
PHONE: 301-713-2328 
FAX: 301-713-4137 



Members of the Fisheries Statistics and 
Economics Division in Silver Spring who helped with 
this publication were: Daryl Bullock, Kim Dawson, 
Josanne Fabian, Tom Ferris, Karen Foster, Amy 
Gautam, Ray Glass, Laurie Hamilton, Rob Hicks, 
Deborah Hogans, Mark Holliday, Steven Koplin, Steve 
Meyers, Barbara O'Bannon, Maury Osborn, Liz 
Pritchard, Warren Schlechte, David Sutherland, Glen 
Taylor, William Uttley, David Van Voorhees, John 
Ward, and Leila Wise. Summer students Aida Ndiaye 
and Melissa Milliken also contributed. 



CONTENTS 



Page 



Page 



PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ii 

REVIEW iv 

U.S. COMMERCIAL FISHERY LANDINGS: 

Species 1 

Disposition 5 

States 6 

Regions 6 

Ports 7 

Catch by species and distance from 

shore (thousand pounds) 8 

Catch by species and distance from 

shore (metric tons) 14 

U.S. Landings for territorial 

processions 20 

U.S. Aquaculture production, 

estimated 1985-1996 24 

Historical landings of whiting, 

by state 26 

U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 32 

MRFSS sample coverage 34 

Number of participants and trips. ... 35 
Number of fish caught and the weight 
of harvest, by species and sub- reg- 
ion or by species and area fished. . 38 

WORLD FISHERIES: 

U.S. and world 67 

Countries 68 

Continents 69 

Fishing areas 69 

Species groups 70 

Disposition ' 70 

Imports and exports, by leading 

countries 71 

U.S. PRODUCTION OF PROCESSED FISHERY 
PRODUCTS: 

Value 73 

Fish sticks, fish portions, and 

breaded shrimp 73 

Fillets and steaks 74 

Canned 75 

Industrial 76 

U.S. COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS 78 

U.S. IMPORTS: 

Principal items 83 

Edible and nonedible 84 

Continent and country 85 

Blocks 86 

Groundfish fillets and steaks, 

species 86 

Canned tuna and quota 87 

Shrimp, country of origin 88 

Shrimp, by product type 89 

Industrial 89 

U.S. EXPORTS: 

Principal items 91 

Edible and nonedible 92 

Continent and country 93 

Shrimp 94 

Salmon 95 



17. S. EXPORTS -■ 

Crab 

Crabmeat . . . . 
Industrial . , 



Coatinued: 



96 

96 
97 



U.S. SUPPLY: 

Edible and nonedible 99 

Finfish and shellfish 100 

All fillets and steaks 101 

Groundfish fillets and steaks 101 

Tuna, fresh and frozen 102 

Canned sardines 103 

Canned salmon 103 

Canned tuna 103 

King crab 104 

Snow (tanner) crab 104 

Canned crabmeat 104 

Lobster, American 105 

Lobster, spiny 105 

Clams 106 

Oysters 106 

Scallops 106 

Shrimp 107 

Industrial 108 

PER CAPITA: 

U.S. consumption 110 

Canned products 112 

Certain items 112 

U.S. use 113 

World, by region and country 114 



PRICES, INDEX OF EXVESSEL. 



VALUE ADDED 

EMPLOYMENT, CRAFT, AND PLANTS. 
FISHERY PRODUCTS INSPECTION. . . 



117 
119 
120 
123 



MAGNUSON FISHERY CONSERVATION AND 
MANAGEMENT ACT OF 1976 (MFCMA) : 

General 124 

Optimum yield, U.S. capacity, reserve, 
and allocations 127 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION. 



128 



PUBLICATONS : 

NOAA Library Services 135 

Government Printing Office 135 

National Marine Fisheries Service -- 
Natl. Technical Inf. Service 136 

SERVICES: 

National Marine Fisheries Service -- 

FAX-on-Demand 144 

NMFS HomePages 146 

Bulletin Boards 147 

Sea Grant Marine Advisory 14 8 

Inspection Inside back cover 

GLOSSARY 150 

INDEX 154 



REVIEW 



U.S. LANDINGS . Commercial landings (edible 
and industrial) by U.S. fishermen at ports in the 50 
states were 9.8 billion pounds or 4.5 million metric 
tons valued at $3.5 billion in 1997--an increase of 
280.9 million pounds (up 3 percent), but a 
decrease of $20.1 million (down 1 percent) 
compared with 1996. The volume of 1997 U.S. 
landings was increased due to landings of major 
species such as menhaden, yellowfin flounder, 
snow (tanner) crab, Atlantic cod and Pacific hake 
(whiting), and due to the inclusion of seaweed 
(kelp) that had been incompletely reported in past 
surveys. The decreased value of 1997 landings 
occun-ed due to the relatively low value associated 
with menhaden and seaweed and decreased 
landings of some high-value fisheries such as 
salmon and shrimp. Finfish accounted for 85 
percent of the total landings, but only 50 percent of 
the value. The 1997 exvessel price paid to 
fishermen was 35 cents compared to 36 cents they 
received in 1996. 

Commercial landings by U.S. fishermen at 
ports outside the 50 states or transferred to internal 
water processing vessels (IWPs) were an 
additional 378.6 million pounds (171,700 metric 
tons) valued at $185.5 million. This was a 7 
percent, or 27.5 million pounds (12,500 metric ton) 
decrease in quantity, but an increase of $25.5 
million (16 percent) in value compared with 1996. 
Most of these landings consisted of halibut 
landings in Canada, sea herring and tuna landed 
in Puerto Rico, American Samoa and other foreign 
ports, and IWP transfers of sea herring. 

Edible fish and shellfish landings in the 50 
states were 7.2 billion pounds (3.3 million metric 
tons) in 1997--a decrease of 226 million pounds 
(103,000 metric tons) compared with 1996. 

Landings for reduction and other industrial 
purposes were 2.6 billion pounds (1.2 million metric 
tons) in 1997-an increase of 20 percent compared 
with 1996. 

The 1997 U.S. marine recreational finfish 
catch (including fish caught and released alive) on 
the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific coasts was an 
estimated 366.2 million fish taken on an estimated 
68.1 million fishing trips. The harvest (fish kept) 



was estimated at 163.6 million fish weighing 234.2 
million pounds. 

WORLD LANDINGS . In 1996, the most recent 
year for which data are available, world 
commercial fishery landings were 121.0 million 
metric tons--an increase of 3.7 million metric tons 
(up 3 percent) compared with 1994. 

China was the leading nation with 26.4 
percent of the total catch; Peru, second with 7.9 
percent; Chile, third with 5.7 percent; Japan, fourth 
with 5.6 percent; and United States, fifth with 4.5 
percent. 



PRICES . The 1997 annual exvessel price index 
for edible fish and shellfish showed an increase of 
5 percent while industrial fish increased 20 percent 
when compared with 1996. Exvessel price indices 
decreased for 12 of the 33 species groups being 
tracked, increased for 20 species groups and were 
not calculated for calico scallops. The sea herring 
price index had the largest decrease (50 percent) 
while the bay scallops price index showed the 
largest increase (61 percent). 



PROCESSED PRODUCTS . The estimated value 
of the 1997 domestic production of edible and 
nonedible fishery products was $6.8 billion, $1.2 
billion (15 percent) less than the $8.0 billion in 
1996. The value of edible products was $6.2 
billion--a decrease of $1.1 billion (15 percent) 
compared with 1996. The value of industrial 
products was $579.1 million in 1997-a decrease of 
$65.4 million (10 percent) compared with 1996. 



FOREIGN TRADE The total import value of 
edible and nonedible fishery products was $14.5 
billion in 1997-an increase of $1.5 billion (11 
percent) compared with 1996. Imports of edible 
fishery products (product weight) were 3.3 billion 
pounds (1.5 million metric tons) valued at $7.8 
billion in 1997-an increase of 169.1 million pounds 
(5 percent) and $1.0 billion (15 percent) compared 
with 1996. Imports of nonedible (i.e., industrial) 
products were $6.8 billion~an increase of $443.3 
million (7 percent) compared with 1996. 



REVIEW 



Total export value of edible and nonedible 
fishery products was $9.4 billion in 1997-an 
increase of $700.2 million (8 percent) compared 
with 1996. United States firms exported 2.0 billion 
pounds (915,800 metric tons) of edible products 
valued at $2.7 billion-a decrease of 93.2 million 
pounds, and $319.2 million compared with 1996. 
Exports of nonedible products were valued at a 
record $6.6 billion, $1.0 billion more than 1996. 

SUPPLY . The U.S. supply of edible fishery 
products (domestic landings plus imports, round 
weight equivalent) was 13.7 billion pounds (6.2 
million metric tons) in 1997-an increase of 115.0 
million pounds compared with 1996. The supply 
of industrial fishery products was 3.7 billion 
pounds (1.7 million metric tons) in 1997--an 
increase of 843.0 million pounds (6 percent) 
compared with 1996. 



PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION. U.S. consumption 
of fishery products was 14.6 pounds of edible meat 
per person in 1997, down 0.2 pound from the 1996 
per capita consumption of 14.8 pounds. 



CONSUMER EXPENDITURES . U.S. consumers 
spent an estimated $46.5 billion for fishery products 
in 1997. The 1997 total includes $31.3 billion in 
expenditures at food service establishments 
(restaurants, canry-outs, caterers, etc.); $14.8 billion 
in retail sales for home consumption; and $323.3 
million for industrial fish products. By producing 
and marketing a variety of fishery products for 
domestic and foreign markets, the commercial 
marine fishing industry contributed $24.4 billion (in 
value added) to the U.S. Gross National Product. 




REVIEW 
OTHER IMPORTANT FACTS 



Alaska pollock, with landings of 2.5 billion 
pounds (1.1 million metric tons), was the most 
important species in quantity and fifth in value for 
1997, accounting for 26 percent of the commercial 
fishery landings in the United States. 



Menhaden was the second most important species in 
quantity, but low in value. 



Cods were third in quantity and sixth in value. 

Salmon were fourth in quantity and fourth in value. 

Flounders were fifth in quantity, and seventh in 
value. 

Hakes were sixth in quantity, but low in value. 
Shrimp were ninth in quantity, but first in value. 

Crabs were seventh in quantity, but second in value. 
Lobsters were low in quantity, but third in value. 



Tuna landings by U.S. -flag vessels at ports 
outside the continental United States amounted to 
373.8 million pounds. Halibut, grouper and sea 
herring also were landed at ports outside the United 
States or transferred to internal water processing 
vessels in U.S. waters. 

Dutch Harbor-Unalaska, Alaska, was the leading 
U.S. port in quantity of commercial fishery landings, 
followed by: Reedville, Virginia; Empire-Venice, 
Louisiana; Cameron, Louisiana; and Seattle, 
Washington. 

Dutch Harbor-Unalaska was also the leading U.S. 
port in terms of value, followed by: New Bedford, 
Massachusetts; Kodiak, Alaska; Empire-Venice, 
Louisiana; and Key West, Florida. 

Alaska led all states in volume with landings of 
4.8 billion pounds, followed by Louisiana, 1.4 billion; 
California, 648.7 million; Virginia, 611.5 million; and 
Washington, 438.6 million pounds. 

Alaska led all states in value of landings with 
$1.1 billion, followed by Louisiana, $318.8 million; 
Maine, $223.2 million; Massachusetts, $214.7 million; 
and Florida, $209.2 million. 




REVIEW 



IMPORTANT SPECIES 



ALASKA POLLOCK AND OTHER PACIFIC TRAWL 
FISH . U.S. landings of Pacific trawl fish (Pacific cod, 
flounders, hake, Pacific ocean perch, Alaska pollock, 
and rockfishes) were 4.4 billion pounds valued at $525.1 
million--an increase of 3 percent in quantity and a 6 
percent increase in value compared with 1 996. 

Landings of Alaska pollock decreased 4 percent 
to 2.5 billion pounds and were 1 5 percent lower than the 
1992-1996 5-year average. Landings of Pacific cod 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1988-1997 
Alaska Pollock, Other Pacific Trawl Fish 




I ^ POUNDS -*- VALUE -«- VALUE deflalgd 



were 661.3 million pounds ~ an increase of 9 percent 
from 605.3 million pounds in 1 996. Pacific hake (whiting) 
landings were 499.6 million pounds (up 16 percent) 
valued at $27.3 million (up 6 percent from 1996). 
Landings of rockfishes were 1 1 7.0 million pounds (up 23 
percent) and valued at $47.9 million (up 23 percent) 
compared to 1996. The 1997 rockfish landings were 12 
percent higher than the 5-year average. 

ANCHOVIES . U.S. landings of anchovies were 12.7 
million pounds~an increase of 2.8 million pounds (28 
percent) compared with 1996. Eighty-two percent of all 
landings were used for animal food or reduction and 12 
percent were used for bait. 



HALIBUT . U.S. landings of Atlantic and Pacific halibut 
were 69.9 million pounds (round weight) valued at 
$117.4 miliion-an increase of 20.8 million pounds (42 
percent) and $33.9 million (41 percent) compared with 



1996. The Pacific fishery accounted for all but 30,000 
pounds of the 1997 total halibut catch. The average 
exvessel price per pound in 1 997 was $1 .68 compared 
with $1.70 in 1996. 

HERRING. SEA . U.S. commercial landings of sea 
herring were 347.9 million pounds valued at $40.9 
million-an increase of 30.3 million pounds (9 percent) 
and a decrease of $40.1 million (49 percent) compared 
with 1 996. Landings of Atlantic sea herring were 21 1 .0 
million pounds valued at $1 1 .5 million-an increase of 
13.9 million pounds (7 percent) and $349,000 (3 percent) 
compared with 1996. 

Landings of Pacific sea herring were 136.9 
million pounds valued at $29.3 million-an increase of 
1 6.4 million pounds (1 4 percent) but a decrease of $40.4 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1988-1997 
Atlantic Sea Herring 




I — POUNDS -LVALUE ^ VALUE delisted I 



million (58 percent) compared with 1996. Alaska 
landings accounted for 84 percent of the Pacific coast 
with 115.5 million pounds valued at $15.9 million-an 
increase of 8. 1 million pounds (8 percent) and a decrease 
of $38.9 million (71 percent) compared with 1996. 



JACK MACKEREL . California accounted for 100 
percent of the U.S. landings of jack mackerel in 1997. 
Total landings were 2.6 million pounds valued at 
$281 ,000-a decrease of 2.2 million pounds (47 percent), 
and $15,000 (5 percent) compared with 1996. The 1997 
average exvessel price per pound rose to 1 1 cents. 



vU 



REVIEW 



IMPORTANT SPECIES 



MACKEREL. ATLANTIC U.S. landings of Atlantic 
mackerel were 33.9 million pounds valued at $9.5 
million-a decrease of 861,000 pounds (2 percent), but 
anincreaseof $4.9 million (106 percent) compared with 
1996. Rhode Island with 21.3 million pounds and New 
Jersey with 9.5 million pounds accounted for 91 percent 
of the total landings. The average exvessel price per 
pound in 1997 was 28 cents, up from 13 cents in 1996. 
The price increase was due to Rhode Island and New 
Jersey mackerel frozen at sea which provided a higher 
exvessel price to fishermen. 



production of meal, oil, and solubles, 
are used for bait and animal food. 



Small quantities 



NORTH ATLANTIC TRAWL FISH . Landings of 
butterfish, Atlantic cod, cusk, flounders (winter/ 
blackback, summer/fluke, yellowtail and other), 
haddock, red and white hake, ocean perch, pollock and 
whiting (silver hake) in the North Atlantic (combination of 
New England, Middle Atlantic, and Chesapeake 
Regions) were 116.0 million pounds valued at $108.1 



MACKEREL. CHUB Landings of Chub mackerel were 
40.6 million pounds valued at $2.8 million--an increase 
of 1 8.6 million pounds (84 percent) and $1 .4 million (1 07 
percent) compared with 1996. The average exvessel 
price per pound was 7 cents, up from 6 cents in 1996. 



MENHADEN The U.S. menhaden landings were 2.0 
billion pounds valued at $112.1 million--an increase of 
272.3 million pounds (16 percent) and $17.9 million (19 
percent) compared with 1996. Landings decreased by 
15.0 million pounds (2 percent) in the Atlantic states and 
increased 287.3 million pounds (27 percent) in the Gulf 
states compared with 1 996. Landings along the Atlantic 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1988-1997 
Atlantic and GuH Menhaden 



2500 ^ 



iii 



I 1 POUNDS —VALUE -»- VALUE daiawd | 



coast were 656.7 million pounds valued at $40.0 million. 
Gulf region landings were 1 .4 billion pounds valued at 
$72.0 million. Menhaden are used primarily for the 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1 988-1 997 
Nortin Atlantic Trawl Fisli 



titlnm 



1994 1995 1996 1997 



■1 POUNDS —VALUE ->- VALUE daflated 



million-a decrease of 18.6 million pounds (14 percent) 
and a decrease of $7.0 million (6 percent) compared with 
1996. Of these species, flounder led in total value in the 
North Atlantic, accounting for 53 percent of the total; 
followed by cod, 23 percent; and whiting, 7 percent. 

The 1997 landings of Atlantic cod were 28.6 
million pounds valued at $24.5 million-a decrease of 2.8 
million pounds (9 percent) and $2.1 million (8 percent) 
compared with 1 996. The exvessel price per pound was 
93 cents in 1997 up from 85 cents per pound in 1996. 

Landings of yellowtail flounder were 6.3 million 
pounds--an increase of 1.0 million pounds (19 percent) 
from 1996, and about 14 percent lower than its 5-year 
average. 

Haddock landings increased to 3.3 million 
pounds (164 percent) and $3.6 million (141 percent) 
when compared with 1996. 



TlU 



REVIEW 



IMPORTANT SPECIES 



North Atlantic pollock landings were 9.4 million 
pounds valued at $5.3 million--an increase of 2.9 million 
pounds (44 percent) and $0.9 million (18 percent) 
compared with 1 996. 



PACIFIC SALMON . U.S. commercial landings of 
salmon were 567.7 million pounds valued at $270.4 
million--a decrease of 309.4 million pounds (35 percent), 
and $98.3 million (27 percent) compared with 1996. 
Alaska and Washington accounted for 94 percent and 4 
percent of the total landings, respectively. Sockeye 
salmon landings were 192.5 million pounds valued at 
$177.3 million--a decrease of 125.9 million pounds (40 
percent), and $89.1 million (33 percent) compared with 
1996. Chinook salmon landings increased to 21.8 
million pounds--up 1 .3 million pounds (6 percent) from 
1 996. Pink salmon landings were 227.0 million pounds- 
-a decrease of 82.8 million pounds (27 percent); chum 
salmon decreased to 103.1 million pounds (43 percent); 
and coho salmon decreased to 23.3 million pounds--a 
decrease of 24.4 million pounds (51 percent) compared 
with 1 996. 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1 988-1 997 
Pacific Salmon 




VALUE -^ VALUE deflated I 



Alaska landings were 537.9 million pounds 
valued at $247.8 million--a decrease of 316.9 million 
pounds (37 percent), and $104.6 million (30 percent) 
compared with 1 996. The distribution of Alaska salmon 
landings by species in 1997 was: sockeye, 185.5 million 
pounds (34 percent); pink, 219.9 million pounds (41 
percent); chum, 98.9 million pounds (18 percent); coho, 
22.3 million pounds (4 percent); and chinook, 11.2 
million pounds (2 percent). The exvessel price per 



pound for all species in Alaska was 46 cents in 1 997- an 
increase of 5 cents from 1 996. 

Washington salmon landings were 20.7 million 
pounds valued at $12.3 million--an increase of 6.5 
million pounds (46 percent), and $5.4 million (78 
percent) compared with 1996. The biennial fishery for 
pink salmon went from no catch in 1996 to 7.1 million 
pounds in 1997. Washington landings of sockeye 
salmon were 6.9 million pounds (up 245 percent); 
followed by chum salmon, 4.2 million pounds--a 
decrease of 2.7 million pounds (down 39 percent); 
silver, 824,000 pounds (down 67 percent); and chinook, 
1.7 million pounds (down 38 percent) compared with 
1996. The average exvessel price per pound for all 
species in Washington increased from 48 cents in 1 996 
to 59 cents in 1997. 

Oregon salmon landings were 2.2 million 
pounds valued at $2.8 million--a decrease of 588,000 
pounds (21 percent) and $516,000 (16 percent) 
compared with 1 996. Landings of chinook salmon were 
2.1 million pounds (down 20 percent) and coho with 
151, 000 pounds (down 30 percent). The average 
exvessel price per pound for all species in Oregon 
increased from $1.16 in 1996 to $1.24 in 1997. 

California salmon landings were 6.1 million 
pounds valued at $7.3 million--an increase of 1 .4 million 
pounds (28 percent) and $1.3 million (22 percent) 
compared with 1 996. Landings of chinook salmon were 
6.1 million pounds; coho landings were 6,000 pounds. 
The average exvessel price per pound paid to fishermen 
in 1997 was $1.20 compared with $1 .26 in 1996. 



SABLEFISH . U.S. commercial landings of sablefish 
were 52.9 million pounds valued at $108.8 million--a 
decrease of 7.0 million pounds (12 percent) and a 
decrease of $232,000 (less than 1 percent) compared 
with 1996. Landings decreased in Alaska to 35.1 million 
pounds, a decrease of 14 percent compared with 1996. 
Landings increased in Washington to 5.0 million pounds 
(1 percent) and $9.7 million (up 15 percent). The 1997 
Oregon catch was 6.5 million pounds (down 8 percent) 
and $10.4 million (up 3 percent) compared with 1996. 
California landings of 6.4 million pounds and $8.9 
million represent a 9 percent decrease in quantity and 
a 3 percent increase in value from 1996. The average 
exvessel price per pound in 1997 was $2.06 compared 
with $1.82 in 1996. 



REVIEW 



IMPORTANT SPECIES 



TUNA . Landings of tuna by U.S. fishermen at ports in the 
50 United States, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, other 
U.S. territories, and foreign ports were 456.6 million 
pounds valued at $294.3 million--an increase of 300,000 
pounds (less than 1 percent) and $28.2 million (11 
percent) compared with 1996. The average exvessel 
price per pound of all species of tuna in 1997 was 64 
cents compared with 58 cents in 1 996. 



Bigeye landings in 1997 were 14.7 million 
pounds--an increase of 300,000 pounds (2 percent) 
compared with 1996. The average exvessel price per 
pound was $1 .69 in 1 997 compared with $1 .91 in 1 996. 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1988-1997 
Tuna (Includes U.S. and Foreign Ports) 




1986 19B9 1990 1991 



POUNDS -»- VALUE — VALUE detteted 



Skipjack landings were 247.3 million pounds--a 
decrease of 36.1 million pounds (13 percent) compared 
with 1 996. The average exvessel price per pound was 45 
cents in 1997, compared to 40 cents in 1996. 

Yellowfin landings were 141.6 million pounds-- 
an increase of 37.6 million pounds (36 percent) 
compared with 1996. The average exvessel price per 
pound was 72 cents in 1997 compared with 64 cents in 
1996. 

Bluefin landings were 7.3 million pounds--a 
decrease of 4.8 million pounds (40 percent) compared 
with 1997. The average exvessel price per pound in 
1 997 was $2.78 compared with $1 .80 in 1 996. 



CLAMS . Landings of all species yielded 114.2 million 
pounds of meats valued at $1 29.7 million--a decrease of 
9.1 million pounds (7 percent), but an increase of $1.9 
million (1 percent) in value compared with 1996. The 
average exvessel price per pound in 1997 was $1.14 
compared with $1 .04 in 1996. 



Surf clams yielded 58.0 million pounds of meats 
valued at $35.2 million--a decrease of 5.4 million 
pounds (9 percent) and $3.0 million (8 percent) 
compared with 1 996. New Jersey was the leading state 
with 45.6 million pounds (down 6 percent), followed by 
New York, 6.9 million pounds (down 10 percent) 
compared with 1996. The average exvessel price per 
pound of meats was 61 cents in 1997, up one cent from 
1996. 



The ocean quahog fishery produced 43.9 
million pounds of meats valued at $19.9 million--a 
decrease of 2.5 million pounds (5 percent) and $623,000 
(3 percent) compared with 1996. New Jersey had 
landings of 18.3 million pounds (up 3 percent) valued at 
$7.6 million (up 4 percent) while Massachusetts 
production was 20.4 million pounds (up 17 percent) 
valued at $8.6 million (up 17 percent). Together, they 
accounted for 88 percent of the total ocean quahog 
production in 1 997. The average exvessel price per 
pound of meats increased from 44 cents in 1 996 to 45 
cents in 1 997. 



Trend in Commercial Landings,1 988-1 997 
Clams 



Mm 



1969 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 
I ^ POUNDS -*- VALUE -» VALUE daflatad | 



REVIEW 



IMPORTANT SPECIES 



The hard clam fishery produced 7.7 million 
pounds of meats valued at $41 .9 million--a decrease of 

2.3 million pounds (23 percent) and $7.5 million (15 
percent) compared with 1996. Landings in the New 
England region were 1.5 million pounds of meats 
(unchanged); Middle Atlantic region, 4.6 million pounds 
(unchanged); Chesapeake region, 687,000 pounds 
(down 14 percent); and the South Atlantic region, 
993,000 pounds (down 44 percent). The average 
exvessel price per pound of meats increased from $4.94 
in 1996 to $5.43 in 1997. 

Soft clams yielded 2.3 million pounds of meats 
valued at $9.9 million--an increase of 99,000 pounds (5 
percent) and $1.7 million (20 percent) compared with 
1996. Maine was the leading state with 1.8 million 
pounds of meats (down 16 percent) followed by New 
York with 271 ,000 pounds (up 32 percent) and Maryland 
with 249,000 pounds (down 22 percent). The average 
exvessel price per pound of meats was $4.32 in 1 997 
compared with $3.75 in 1996. 

CRABS . Landings of all species of crabs were 430.0 
million pounds valued at $429.5 miiiion--an increase of 
38.2 million pounds (10 percent), and $2.8 million (1 
percent) compared with 1 996. 

Hard blue crab landings were 230.8 million 
pounds valued at $158.2 million--an increase of 11.9 
million pounds (5 percent) and $11.1 million (8 percent) 
compared with 1 996. North Carolina landed 25 percent 
of the total; Maryland, 19 percent; Louisiana, 19 percent; 
and Virginia, 18 percent of the total U.S. landings. Hard 
blue crab landings in the Chesapeake region were 87.4 
million pounds--an increase of 28 percent; the South 
Atlantic region with 75.3 million pounds decreased 13 
percent; and the Gulf region, 61.2 million pounds, 
increased 7 percent. The Middle Atlantic region with 1 0.6 
million pounds valued at $7.3 million had an increase of 

3.4 million pounds (48 percent) compared with 1996. 
The average exvessel price per pound of hard blue crabs 
was 69 cents in 1997, two cents more than in 1996. 

Dungeness crab landings were 38.2 million 
pounds valued at $75.7 million--a decrease of 26.8 
million pounds (41 percent) and $12.2 million (14 
percent) compared with 1 996. Washington landings of 
15.7 million pounds (down 43 percent) led all states with 
41 percentof the total landings. California landings were 



10.0 million pounds (down 19 percent) compared with 
1 996. Oregon landings were 7.7 million pounds (down 
60 percent) and Alaska landings were 4.9 million 
pounds (down 1 7 percent) compared with 1 996. The 
average exvessel price per pound was $1 .98 in 1 997 
compared with $1 .35 in 1996. 

U.S. landings of king crab were 18.0 million 
pounds valued at $50.6 million--a decrease of 3.0 
million pounds (14 percent) and $12.0 million (19 
percent) compared with 1996. The average exvessel 
price per pound in 1 997 was $2.81 compared with $2.98 
in 1996. 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1988-1997 
Crabs 



mm 



1091 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 



I ^ POUNDS —VALUE 



Snow (tanner) crab landings were 1 1 8.9 million 
pounds valued at $95.7 million--an increase of 51.0 
million pounds (43 percent) a^nd $2.4 million (3 percent) 
compared with 1 996. The average exvessel price per 
pound was 80 cents in 1 997, down from $1 .37 in 1 996. 



LOBSTER. AMERICAN . American lobster landings 
were 83.9 million pounds valued at $267.2 million--an 
increase of 12.3 million pounds (17 percent), and 
$25.4 million (11 percent) compared with 1996. Maine 
led in landings for the sixteenth consecutive year with 
46.8 million pounds valued at $137.5 million--an 
increase of 10.8 million pounds (30 percent) compared 
with 1996. Massachusetts, the second leading 
producer, had landings of 1 4.9 million pounds valued at 



REVIEW 



IMPORTANT SPECIES 



$52.1 million--a decrease of 800,000 pounds (5 percent) 
compared with 1996. Together, Maine and Massachu- 
setts produced 73 percent of the total national landings. 
The average exvessel price per pound was $3.18 in 
1997 compared with $3.38 in 1996. 



LOBSTERS. SPINY U.S. landings of spiny lobster 
were 7.2 million pounds valued at $33.4 million--a 
decrease of 1.1 million pounds (13 percent) and $1 .8 
million (5 percent) compared with 1996. Florida, with 
landings of 6.1 million pounds valued at $25.4 million, 
accounted for 85 percent of the total catch and 76 
percent of the value. This was a decrease of 1 .3 million 
pounds (18 percent), and $3.2 million (12 percent) 
compared with 1996. Overall the average exvessel 
price per pound was $4.61 in 1 997 compared with $4.24 
in 1996. 



OYSTERS U.S. oyster landings yielded 39.7 million 
pounds of meats valued at $111 .2 million -- an 
increase of 1.6 million pounds (4 percent), but a 
decrease of $3.7 million (3 percent) compared with 
1 996. The Gulf region led in production with 23.2 million 
pounds of meats, 58 percent of the national total; 
followed by the Pacific region (principally Washington, 
with 89 percent of the region's total volume) with 8.9 
million pounds (22 percent), and the New England 
region, with 4.2 million pounds (11 percent). The 
average exvessel price per pound of meats was $2.80 in 
1997 compared with $3.02 in 1996. 



SHRIMP U.S. landings of shrimp were 290.3 million 
pounds valued at $544.1 million--a decrease of 26.6 
million pounds (8 percent), but an increase of $34.9 
million (7 percent) in value compared with 1 996. Shrimp 
landings decreased in the South Atlantic (down 37 
percent) and New England (down 33 percent), and were 
down 6 percent in the Gulf. The landings in the Pacific 
increased 22 percent when compared with 1996. The 
average exvessel price per pound of shrimp increased to 
$1.87 in 1997 compared with $1.61 in 1996. Gulf region 
landings were the nation's largest with 205.5 million 
pounds, and 71 percent of the national total. Louisiana 
led all Gulf states with 93.2 million pounds (up 3 



percent), followed by Texas, 71 .3 million pounds (down 
6 percent); Florida (West Coast), 19.7 million pounds 
(down 23 percent); Alabama, 1 1 .6 million pounds (down 
30 percent); and Mississippi, 9.7 million pounds (down 
2 percent). In the Pacific region, Oregon had landings of 
19.6 million pounds (up 25 percent), California had 15.3 
pounds (up 31 percent) , and Washington had landings of 
6.1 million pounds (down 10 percent) compared with 
1996. 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1988-1997 
Shrimp 




.-*- VALUE deflated | 



SCALLOPS . U.S. landings of bay, calico and sea 
scallops totaled 15.5 million pounds of meats valued 
at $94.2 million -- a decrease of 2.7 million pounds 
(17 percent), and $7.7 million (8 percent) compared 
with 1996. The average exvessel price per pound of 
meats increased from $5.60 in 1996 to $6.09 in 1997. 

Bay scallop landings were 72,000 pounds of 
meats valued at $310,000--an increase of 37,000 
pounds (106 percent) and $216,000 (230 percent) 
compared with 1 996. The average exvessel price per 
pound of meats was $4.31 in 1 997 compared with $2.68 
in 1996. 

Sea scallop landings were 13.8 million pounds 
of meats valued at $90.3 million--a decrease of 4.4 
million pounds (24 percent) and $11.5 million (11 
percent) compared with 1996. Massachusetts and 
Virginia were the leading states in landings of sea 
scallops with 7.1 and 3.3 million pounds of meats, 



lU 



REVIEW 
IMPORTANT SPECIES 



respectively. These represent 75 percent of the national 
total. The average exvessel price per pound of meats in 
1997 was $6.55 compared with $5.61 in 1996. 

Florida accounted for the total landings of calico 
scallops with 1 .6 million pounds valued at $3.6 million in 
1997. 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1988-1997 
Atlantic Sea Scallops 




percent) compared with 1 996. California was the leading 
state with 156.4 million pounds, 70 percent of the 
national total. The Pacific region landings were 157.6 
million pounds (down 10 percent), followed by the 
Middle Atlantic, 33.2 million pounds (up 11 percent); 
New England, 31 .8 million pounds (down 7 percent); and 
the South Atlantic region, 840,000 pounds (up 300 
percent) compared with 1996. The average exvessel 
price per pound for squid was 25 cents in 1997, 
unchanged from 1 996. 



SQUID . U.S. commercial landings of squid were 223.8 
million pounds valued at $55.5 million--a decrease of 
16.3 million pounds (7 percent) and $4.7 million (8 



Trend in Commercial Landings, 1988-1997 
Squid 




■ POUNDS -»- VALUE -»- VALUE (tengBd] 




xUl 



REVIEW 



PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION 



The NMFS calculation of per capita 
consumption is based on a "disappearance" model. 
The total U.S. supply of imports and landings is 
converted to edible weight and decreases in supply 
such as exports and inventories are subtracted out. 
The remaining total is divided by a population value to 
estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model 
are derived primarily from secondary sources and are 
subject to incomplete reporting; changes in source 
data or invalid model assumptions may each have a 
significant effect on the resulting calculation. 



U.S. per capita consumption of fish and 
shellfish was 14.6 pounds (edible meat) in 1997. This 
total was 0.2 pounds less than the 14.8 pounds 
consumed in 1996. Per capita consumption of fresh 
and frozen products was 9.9 pounds, 0.1 pound less 
than 1996. 



Fresh and frozen finfish accounted for 6.1 
pounds while fresh and frozen shellfish consumption 
was 3.8 pounds per capita. The fresh and frozen 
finfish includes approximately 0.9 pound of farm 
raised catfish. Consumption of canned fishery 
products was 4.4 pounds per capita in 1997, a 
decrease of 0.1 pound from 1996. Cured fish 
accounted for 0.3 pound per capita, the same as in 
previous years. Imports of edible seafood made up 61 
percent of the consumption. 

PER CAPITA USE . Per capita use is based on the 
supply of fishery products, both edible and non-edible 
(industrial), on a round-weight equivalent basis without 
considering beginning or ending stocks, defense 
purchases, or exports. The per capita use of all edible 
and industrial fishery products in 1997 was 63.9 
pounds, up 1.8 pounds compared with 1996. 




^^m^0>MBM. 



REVIEW 

PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 
FRESH AND FROZEN 



FISH FILLETS AND STEAKS . In 1997 the U.S. 
production of raw (uncooked) fish fillets and steaks, 
including blocks, was 397.5 million pounds-25.8 million 
pounds less than the 423.3 million pounds in 1996. 
These fillets and steaks were valued at $908.9 million- 
$4.9 million more than 1996. Alaska pollock fillets and 
blocks led all species with 112.0 million pounds-28 
percent of the total. Production of groundfish fillets and 
steaks (see Glossary Section-Groundfish) was 219.5 
million pounds compared with 245.4 million pounds in 
1996. 



FISH STICKS AND PORTIONS, The combined 
production of fish sticks and portions was 264.7 million 
pounds valued at $349.6 million compared with the 1 996 
production of 279.2 million pounds valued at $362.3 
million-a decrease of 14.5 million pounds and $12.7 
million. 



The total production of fish sticks amounted to 
69.1 million pounds valued at $64.3 million-an increase 
of 3.9 million pounds and $8.5 million compared with 
1996. The total production of fish portions amounted 
to 195.6 million pounds valued at $285.3 million - 



a decrease of 18.4 million pounds and $21.2 million 
compared with 1996. 

BREADED SHRIMP . The production of breaded 
shrimp in 1997 was 117.0 million pounds valued at 
$333.3 million, compared with the 1996 production of 
1 08.5 million pounds valued at $341 .8 million. 



FROZEN FISHERY TRADE. In 1997, stocks of frozen 
fishery products in cold storage were at a low of 318.4 
million pounds on February 28 and a high of 507.8 
million pounds on October 31. Cold storage holdings 
of shrimp products were at a high of 47.7 million 
pounds on December 31 and a low of 29.0 million 
pounds on July 31. Holdings of saltwater fillets and 
steaks reached a high of 88.7 million pounds on July 
31 and were at a low of 64.5 million pounds on January 
31 . Holdings of blocks and slabs were at a high of 60.3 
million pounds on December 31 and a low of 41.4 
million pounds on February 28. Surimi reached a high 
of 19.8 million pounds on November 30 and was at a 
low of 11.2 million pounds on July 31. Analog 
Products reached a high of 4.8 million pounds on 
January 31 and a low of 3.4 million pounds on 
December 31 . 




REVIEW 

PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 
CANNED FISHERY PRODUCTS 



nANNFD FIS HFRY PRODUCTS The pack of canned 
fishery products in the 50 states, American Samoa, and 
Puerto Rico was 1.6 billion pounds valued at $1.6 
billion-a decrease of 311.9 million pounds, and $206.7 
million compared with the 1996 pack. The 1997 pack 
included 952.8 million pounds valued at $1.4 billion for 
human consumption and 612.3 million pounds valued 
at $231 .8 million for bait and animal food. 



CANNED SALMON . The 1997 U.S. pack of salmon 
was 162.1 million pounds valued at $252.8 million, 
compared with 197.2 million pounds valued at $284.3 
million packed in 1996. 



CANNED SARDINES . The pack of Maine sardines 
(small hening) was 16.0 million pounds valued at $29.0 
million, a decrease of 1 .7 million pounds and $830,000 
compared with 1996. There were 5.9 million pounds of 
herring valued at $11.2 million packed in 1997 - 
362,000 pounds less, but $346,000 more in value than 
the 1996 pack. 



albacore tuna was 185.3 million pounds--1 9.7 million 
pounds more than the 165.6 million pounds produced 
in 1996. Albacore tuna comprised 30 percent of the 
tuna pack in 1997. Lightmeat tuna (bigeye, bluefin, 
skipjack, and yellowfin) comprised the remainder with 
a pack of 441.7 million pounds-68.4 million pounds 
less than the 510.2 million pounds packed in 1996. 



CANNED CLAMS . The 1997 U.S. pack of clams 
(whole, minced, chowder, juice, and specialties) was 
124.9 million pounds valued at $114.6 million-a 
decrease of 4.5 million pounds and $2.7 million less in 
value than the pack in 1996. The pack of whole and 
minced clams was 43.7 million pounds-2.2 million 
pounds more than the 1996 pack and accounted for 35 
percent of the total clam pack. Clam chowder and 
clam juice was 69.9 million pounds and made up the 
majority of the pack. 



CANNED SHRIMP . The U.S. pack of natural shrimp 
was 1.2 million pounds valued at $4.6 million-an 
increase of 349,000 pounds, but a decrease of $1.5 
million in value compared with the 1996 pack. 



CANNED TUNA . The U.S. pack of tuna was 627.0 
million pounds valued at $918.7 million--a decrease of 
48.8 million pounds in quantity and $38.2 million in 
value compared with the 1996 pack. The pack of 



OTHER CANNED ITEMS . The pack of pet food was 
612.3 million pounds valued at $231.8 million--a 
decrease of 211.8 million pounds compared with the 
1 996 pack. 




REVIEW 

PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 
INDUSTRIAL FISHERY PRODUCTS 



INDUSTRIAL FISHERY PRODUCTS . The value of 
the domestic production of industrial fishery products 
was $347.4 million--an increase of $73.8 million 
compared with the 1996 value of $273.6 million. 



FISH MEAL . The domestic production of fish and 
shellfish meal was 724.7 million pounds valued at 
$173.9 million-an increase of 81.5 million pounds, and 
$36.0 million compared with 1996. Menhaden meal 
production was 478.5 million pounds valued at $115.7 
million-an increase of 59.6 million pounds and $28.9 
million compared with 1 996. Menhaden accounted for 
66 percent of the 1997 production of meal. Shellfish 
meal production was 18.1 million pounds--an increase 
of 476,000 pounds from the 1996 level. Tuna and 
mackerel meal production was 56.1 million pounds-a 
decrease of 662,000 pounds from 1996. Production of 
unclassified meal (consisting mainly of Alaska pollock 
and unclassified fish) was 171.9 million pounds--an 
increase of 22.1 million pounds compared with 1996. 



FISH SOLUBLES . Domestic production of fish 
solubles was 144.0 million pounds, 62.0 million pounds 
more than the 1996 production. 



FISH OILS . The domestic production of fish oils was 
283.4 million pounds valued at $55.3 million-an 
increase of 35.0 million pounds, and $11.3 million in 
value compared with 1996 production. The production 
of menhaden oil was 278.0 million pounds valued at 
$53.7 million-an increase of 31 .5 million pounds, and 
$10.0 million compared with 1996. Menhaden oil 
accounted for 98 percent of the volume and value of 
the total 1997 fish oil production. 

OTHER INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS Oyster shell 
products, together with agar-agar, animal feeds, crab 
and clam shells processed for food serving, fish 
pellets, Irish moss extracts, kelp products, dry and 
liquid fertilizers, pearl essence, and mussel shell 
buttons were valued at $108.6 million, compared with 
$85.6 million in 1996-an increase of $23.0 million. 







B 


egl 






/'"'^■—^ 


'■Ri^ 




/ 


-UsyH^ 


'jM 


'^ 




y 






^ 


/ 









REVIEW 
FOREIGN TRADE IN FISHERY PRODUCTS 



IMPORT^ . U.S. imports of edible fishery products in 
1997 were valued at $7.8 billion, $1.0 billion more 
than in 1996. The quantity of edible imports was 3.3 
billion pounds, 169.1 million pounds more than the 
quantity imported in 1996. 

Edible imports consisted of 2.9 billion pounds 
of fresh and frozen products valued at $7.0 billion, 
387.1 million pounds of canned products valued at 
$525.3 million, 69.0 million pounds of cured products 
valued at $1 31 .6 million, 4.3 million pounds of caviar 
and roe products valued at $31.2 million, and 16.9 
million pounds of other products valued at $44.2 
million. 

The quantity of shrimp imported in 1997 was 
648.3 million pounds, 65.9 million pounds more than 
the quantity imported in 1996. Valued at $2.9 billion, 
shrimp imports accounted for 37 percent of the value 
of total edible imports. Imports of fresh and frozen 
tuna were 438.5 million pounds, 90.2 million pounds 
less than the 528.7 million pounds imported in 1996. 
Imports of canned tuna were 212.2 million pounds, 
19.1 million pounds more than in 1996. Imports of 
fresh and frozen fillets and steaks amounted to 514.8 
million pounds, an increase of 38.3 million pounds from 
1 996. Regular and minced block imports were 234.0 
million pounds, a decrease of 238,000 pounds from 
1996. 



Imports of nonedible fishery products were 
valued at $6.8 billion--an increase of $443.3 million 



compared with 1996. The total value of edible and 
nonedible products was $14.5 billion in 1997, $1.4 
billion more than in 1 996 when $1 3.1 billion of fishery 
products were imported. 



EXPORT^. U.S. exports of edible fishery products 
were 2.0 billion pounds valued at $2.7 billion, a 
decrease of 93.2 million pounds, and $319.2 million 
when compared with 1996. Fresh and frozen items 
were 1.8 billion pounds valued at $2.1 billion, a 
decrease of 29.6 million pounds, and $189.8 million 
compared with 1996. In terms of individual species, 
fresh and frozen exports consisted principally of 189.9 
million pounds of salmon valued at $307.5 million, 
31 0.2 million pounds of surimi valued at $331 .0 million 
and 47.2 million pounds of lobsters valued at $208.6 
million. 

Canned items were 129.5 million pounds 
valued at $202.7 million. Salmon was the major 
canned item exported, with 81.6 million pounds valued 
at $135.4 million. Cured items were 10.6 million 
pounds valued at $20.9 million. Caviar and roe 
exports were 90.0 million pounds valued at $369.1 
million. 

Exports of nonedible products were valued at 
$6.6 billion compared with $5.6 billion in 1996. Exports 
offish meal amounted to 216.3 million pounds valued 
at $57.2 million. The total value of edible and 
nonedible exports was $9.4 billion--an increase of 
$700.2 million compared with 1996. 







^^■■^^^■^ 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



U.S. DOMESTIC LANDINGS, BY SPECIES, 1996 AND 1997 (1) 



Species 



Average 
(1992-96) 



Fish 



Alewives 

Anchovies 

Atka mackerel 

Bluefish 

Blue runner 

Bonito 

Butterfish 

Catfish and bullheads. 

Chubs 

Cod: 

Atlantic 

Pacific 

Crevalle (jack) 

Croaker : 

Atlantic 

Pacific (white) 

Cusk 

Dolphinfish 

Eels, American 

Flounders : 

Arrowtooth 

Winter (blackback) . . 

Plaice, American.... 

Summer (fluke) 

Sole: 

Dover 

Flathead 

Witch (gray) 

Petrale 

Rock 

Yellowf in 

Yellowtail 

Atlantic/Gulf, Other 

Pacific, Other 

Total, flounders. . 
Goosefish (anglerfish) 

Groupers 

Haddock 

Hake: 

Pacific (whiting) . . . 

Red 

Silver (Atl .whiting) 

White 

Halibut 

Herring: 

Sea: 

Atlantic 

Pacific 

Thread 

Jack mackerel 

Lingcod 

Mackerel : 

Atlantic 

Chub 

King and cero 

Spanish 



Thousand 
pounds 

975 

9,933 

194,070 

9,356 

263 
1,339 
9,685 
9,062 
3,014 

31,422 

605,314 

299 

19,950 

533 

1,031 

1,629 

973 



23,495 

12,537 

9,693 

16,793 



25,114 
4,591 

57,764 

223,445 

5,297 

578 

80,220 



455,527 



53,357 
9,703 
1,257 

430,537 
2,397 

35,400 
7,252 

49,092 



197,124 

120,434 

9,989 

4,798 

4,972 

34,801 

21,994 

4,560 

3,406 



Metric 
tons 

442 

4,506 

88,030 

4,244 

119 

607 

4,393 

4,110 

1,367 

14,253 

274,569 

136 

9,049 
242 
468 
739 
441 



Thousand 
dollars 

198 

988 

29, 111 

3,166 

138 

425 

5,847 

4,411 

1,873 

26,634 

111,978 

209 

7,069 

317 

664 

2,620 

2,712 



Thousand 




28,619 

661,314 

593 

27,413 

368 

977 

1,970 

1,069 



12,981 

299,970 

269 

12,434 
167 
443 
894 
485 



24,464 

142,429 

378 

8,834 

224 

563 

2,640 

6,592 



10,657 
5,687 
4,397 
7,617 



11,392 
2,082 

26,202 

101,354 

2,403 

262 

36,388 



1,500 
15,421 
12,365 
28,027 



7,534 
7,728 

6,760 
42,471 

7,639 

833 

23,771 



13,934 

12,710 

8,680 

8,784 

27,210 

28,367 
3,913 
4,270 

72,205 

329,150 

6,313 

4,969 

45,848 



6,320 
5,765 
3,937 
3,984 

12,342 

12,867 
1,775 
1,937 

32,752 

149,301 

2,864 

2,254 

20,797 



831 
16,167 
11,405 
16,331 

7,255 

2,773 

6,570 

3,852 

10,354 

25,694 

9,477 

9,196 

10,864 



208,440 



154,049 



566,353 



256,896 



130,769 



24,203 

4,401 

570 

195,290 

1,087 

16,057 

3,289 

22,268 



89,415 

54,629 

4,531 

2,176 

2,255 

15,786 
9,976 
2,068 
1,545 



29,627 

22,409 

1,494 

17,031 

695 

13,494 

4,553 

83,468 



11,194 

69,747 

818 

296 

2,277 

4,624 
1,336 
5,880 
1,778 



10,276 
3,316 

499,598 

2,929 

34,248 

4,897 

69,864 



211,010 

136,861 

16,641 

2,557 

4,164 

33,940 

40,558 

5,544 

3,738 



27,506 
4,661 
1,504 

226,616 
1,329 

15,535 
2,221 

31,690 



95,714 

62,080 

7,548 

1,160 

1,889 

15,395 

18,397 

2,515 

1,696 



34,591 

23,665 

3,595 

27,344 

790 

15,024 

3,229 

117,362 



11,543 
29,341 

1,007 
281 

2,021 

9,527 
2,762 
7,606 
1,933 



Thousand 
pounds 

1,962 
9,704 
153,623 
9,905 
1,158 
1,987 
7,688 
11,026 
4,141 

42,298 

538,065 

125 

11,901 

582 

2,350 

1,626 

1,134 



26,913 
10,931 
11,696 
19,198 



14,642 
5,215 

81,560 

236,001 

7,305 



510,953 



11,400 
1,981 

362,394 

3,613 

35,239 

12,662 

56,684 



135,934 

123,989 

9,360 

4,373 

4,772 

21,677 

25,803 

4,684 

4,638 



See notes at end of table . 



(Continued) 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



U.S. DOMESTIC LANDINGS, BY SPECIES, 1996 AND 1997 (1) - Continued 



Species 


1996 


1997 


Average 
(1992-96) 


Fi.qh - Continued: 
Menhaden: 


Thousand 
pounds 

671,664 
1,083,807 


Metric 

304,665 
491,612 


Thousand 
dollars 

39,677 
54,473 


Thousand 
pounds 

656,666 
1,371,136 


Metric 

K,<ias. 

297,862 
621,943 


Thousand 

40,009 
72,041 


Thousand 
j22uad£ 

713,286 
1,197,439 


Gulf 

Total, menhaden. . . 


1,755,471 


796,276 


94,150 


2,027,802 


919,805 


112,050 


1,510,725 


17,026 

720 
46,305 

6,529 
2,623,131 


7,723 

327 
21,004 

2,962 
1,189,844 


12,518 

477 
6,171 

4,543 
238,129 


19,637 

553 
43,166 

9,372 
2,512,455 


251 
19,580 

4,251 
1,139,642 


13,419 

346 
3,186 

5,349 
242,589 


24,650 

1,254 
40,519 

10,052 
2,962,080 


Ocean perch: 




Pollock: 


Walleye (Alaska) .... 
Rockf ishes: 


94,760 


42,983 


39,049 


1,596 
2,782 
4,079 

17,088 
6,051 

85,392 


724 
1,262 
1,850 
7,751 
2,745 
38,734 


610 
1,369 
1,626 
5,235 
2,227 
36,832 


- 


Canary 


Widow 


Other 

Total, rockfisbea. 

Sablefish 

Salmon, Pacific: 

Chinook or king 

Chum or keta 

Pink 

Red or sockeye 

Silver or coho 

Total, saljnon 

Sardines : 


54, 7^0 


42,583 


39.049 


116,988 


53,065 


47,855 


104,463 


59,949 


27,193 


109,009 


52,925 


24,007 


108,776 


70,022 


20,463 
180,573 
309,839 
318,443 

47,738 


9,282 

81,907 

140,542 

144,445 

21,654 


23,470 
29,442 
26,723 
266,422 
22,672 


21,772 
103,163 
226,995 
192,460 

23,268 


9,876 

46,794 

102,964 

87,299 

10,554 


27,680 
22, lis 
26,470 
177,284 
16,161 


22,805 
152,836 
333,311 
342,890 

54,758 


877, OSS 


397,830 


3^8,725 


5S7, 658 


257,488 


270,370 


906,600 


71,657 
1,258 
6,895 

4,361 
101 

7,189 

1,066 

168 

3,819 
193 

65,342 
15,345 

3,308 
34,052 

1,747 

4,422 

5,235 
210 


32,503 

571 

3,128 

1,978 
46 

3,261 

484 

76 

1,732 
88 

29,639 
6,960 
1,500 

15,446 
792 

2,006 

2,375 
95 


3,053 

268 

7,330 

4,751 
193 

4,839 

1,155 

94 

1,832 
51 

11,804 

10,824 

1,147 

6,757 

895 

9,529 

10,155 
230 


94,393 
1,128 
5,718 

3,506 
62 

7,314 
943 
161 

3,058 
165 

46,345 
14,934 

3,843 
27,845 

3,076 

5,161 

1,630 

3,840 

220 


42,816 

512 

2,594 

1,590 
28 

3,318 
428 

73 

1,387 
75 

21,022 
6,774 
1,743 

12,630 
1,395 

2,341 
739 

1,742 
100 


4,071 

279 

7,449 

4,927 

127 

4,136 

1,091 

91 

1,272 
43 

7,307 
8,536 
1,336 
4,209 
1,075 

10,365 

3,245 

7,884 

190 


38,897 

1,576 
9,711 

3,778 
93 

6,860 

1,995 

275 

3,158 
92 

49,298 
416 

4,247 
29,399 

2,932 

3,679 

6,759 
137 


Spanish 

Scup or porgy 

Sea bass : 

Black (Atlantic) .... 

White (Pacific) 

Sea trout or weakfish: 

Gray 


Sand (white) 

Shad: 


Hickory 

Sharks : 

Dogfish 


Sheepshead (Atlantic) . 

Skates 

Smelts 

Snapper : 

Red 


Unclassified 

Spearfish 



See notes at end of table. 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



U.S. DOMESTIC LANDINGS, BY SPECIES, 1996 AND 1997 (1) - Continued 



Species 



Average 
(1992-96) 



Fish - Continued: 



Spot 

Striped bass 

Swordfish 

Tenpounder (ladyfish) . . 

Tilefish 

Trout, rainbow 

Tuna: 

Albacore 

Bigeye 

Bluefin 

Little (tunny) 

Skipjaclt 

Yellowf in 

Unclassified 

Total, tuna 

Whitefish, lake 

Wolf fish, Atlantic 

Yellow perch 

Other marine 

f inf ishes 

Other freshwater 
f inf ishes 

Total, fiab 

Shellfish 

Abalone 

Clams : 

Quahog (hard) 

Geoduck (Pacific) .... 

Manila 

Ocean quahog 

Softshell 

Surf (Atlantic) 

Other 

Total, clams 

Conch (snails) 

Crabs : 

Blue: Hard 

Soft and peeler 

Dungeness 

Jonah 

King 

Snow (tanner) : 

Opilio 

Bairdi 

Other 

Total, crabB 

Crawfish (freshwater) . . 

Horseshoe crab 

Lobsters: 

American 

Spiny 

Mussels, b+A1641ue (sea 
Oysters 



Thousand 
pounds 

5,S31 

4,712 

12,879 

3,226 
371 



Metric 
tons 

2,554 
2,137 
5,842 

1,463 
168 



Thousand 
dollars 

2,034 

8,021 

36,494 

5,356 



Thousand 
pounds 

6,775 
6,176 
13,586 
1,602 
4,230 
303 



Metric 
tons 

3,073 
2,801 
6,163 

727 
1,919 

137 



Thousand 
dollars 

2,738 

8,970 

33,786 

505 
5,829 

242 



34,053 

6,254 

12,148 

197 
14,717 
17,484 

586 



15,446 
2,837 
5,510 
89 
6,676 
7,931 
266 



30,157 

23,673 

21,857 

53 

7,084 

27,060 

372 



28,824 

6,985 

7,265 

994 

15,874 

22,524 

389 



13,074 

3,168 

3,295 

451 

7,200 

10,217 

176 



24,684 
21,231 
20,207 

359 

8,688 

34,224 

401 



85,439 



38,755 



110,256 



82,855 



37,583 



11,623 

801 

1,568 

78,193 

11,503 



5,272 
363 

711 

35,468 
5,218 



8,789 

329 

3,822 

41,483 

3,520 



12,880 

682 

1,371 

66,854 

15,045 



5,842 
309 
622 

30,325 

6,824 



9,702 

265 

2,851 

34,768 

4,875 



8,272,709 3,752,476 1,790,966 



8,397,286 3,808,984 1,722,205 



1, 056 



46,460 
2,200 

63,438 
1,151 



21,074 
998 

28,775 
522 



20,552 

8,253 

38,220 

11,428 



7,708 

1,081 

201 

43,940 

2,299 

57,977 

978 



3,496 

490 

91 

19,931 

1,043 

26,298 

444 



41,865 
14,161 

1,248 
19,929 

9,929 
35,185 

7,369 



55,901 



127,799 



114,184 



51,794 



6,669 



3,871 



2,258 



218,960 

3,525 

64,988 

736 

21,000 

64,380 

3,487 

14,721 



99,320 
1,599 

29,478 

334 

9,526 

29,203 
1,582 
6,677 



147,061 

11,447 

87,858 

34G 

62,560 

85,497 

7,752 

24,184 



230,830 
4,021 

38,202 
1,643 

18,028 

117,090 

1,808 

18,341 



104,704 

1,824 

17,328 

745 

8,177 

53,112 

820 

8,319 



158,188 

12,534 

75,682 

806 

50,576 

92,380 

3,317 

36,064 



391,797 



426,705 



429,963 



195,030 



12,541 
3,522 

71,641 
8,308 
5,837 

38,007 



5,689 
1,598 

32,496 
3,768 
2,648 

17,240 



10,471 
1, 134 

241,796 

35,227 

4,248 

114,839 



23,140 
5,748 

83,921 
7,240 
4,532 

39,652 



10,496 
2,607 

38,066 
3,284 
2,056 

17,986 



12,997 
1,197 

267,216 

33,381 

2,288 

111,185 



Thousand 
pounds 

7,203 

2,589 

16,481 

4,127 
563 



20,716 

6,165 

5,598 

582 

11,878 

20,977 

732 



66,648 



11,224 
1,004 
2,788 



48,813 

3,162 

68,506 



135,818 



4,391 



214,305 

2,667 

51,193 

1,212 

18,284 

165,716 
17,016 



25,650 
1,527 

61,958 
6,897 
6,282 

36,832 



See notes at end of table. 



(Continued) 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



U.S. DOMESTIC LANDINGS, BY SPECIES, 1996 AND 1997 (1) ■ Continued 

















Average 


Species 




1996 






1997 




(1992-96) 


Shellfish - Continued 


Thousand 


Metric 


Thousanti 


Thousand 


Metric 


Thousand 


Thousand 




c>'2un';Js 


taas. 


dollars 


Bounds 


tons 


dollars 


Dounds 


Scallops 
















Bay 


35 


16 


94 


72 


33 


310 


249 


Calico, Atlantic... 


- 


- 


- 


1,613 


732 


3,601 


603 




18,162 


8,238 


101,823 


13,789 


6,255 


90,291 


21,001 


Shrimp : 
















New England 


20,978 


9,516 


15,162 


14,010 


6,355 


11,477 


11,188 


South Atlantic 


40,437 


18,342 


66,366 


25,638 


11,629 


68,655 


31,884 


Gulf 


218,559 


99,138 


401,354 


205,517 


93,222 


436,929 


214,614 




36,867 
38 


16,723 
17 


26,155 
166 


45,054 
36 


20,436 

16 


26,817 
178 


49,614 
39 


Other 

Total, Bbrimp 

Squid: 


316,879 


143,735 


509,203 


290,255 


131,659 


544,056 


307,339 
















Atlantic: 
















Illex 


37,588 
27,536 


17,050 
12,490 


9,737 
18,661 


30,054 
35,630 


13,632 
16,162 


6,440 
26,476 


37,874 
41,579 


Loligo 


Unclassified 


124 


56 


116 


493 


224 


427 


1,674 


Pacific : 


















174,785 


79,282 


31,712 


156,348 


70,919 


22,056 


110,885 


Unclassified 

Total Squid 

Other shellfish 

Total Shell fiBb. . 

Other 


- 


- 


- 


1,258 


571 


82 


- 


240,033 


108,878 


60,226 


223,783 


101,507 


55,481 


192,017 


10,159 


4,608 


9,615 


7,312 


3,317 


11,378 


... 


1,246,885 


565,583 


1,649,208 


1,247,507 


565,865 


1,696,524 


... 


















44,932 


20,381 


44,740 


44,568 
155,274 


20,216 
70,432 


39,330 
2,443 


60,974 


Seaweed, unclassified. 


Kelp (w/herring eggs) . 


362 


164 


1,799 


657 


298 


3,596 


714 


Worms 

Total other 

Grand total 


- 


- 


- 


492 


223 


2,507 


- 


45,294 


20,545 


46,539 


200,991 


91,169 


47,876 




9,564,888 


4,338,605 


3,486,713 


9,845,784 


4,466,018 


3,466,605 


... 



(1) Landings are reported in round (live) weight for all items except univalve and bivalve mollusks 
such as clams, oysters, and scallops, which are reported in weight of meats (excluding the shell) . 
Landings for Mississippi River drainage area States are not available. 



(-) Data are not available prior to 1997 for the production of "FUS.' 



Note : --Metric tons are arrived at by dividing the landings of individual species and group totals 
by 2.2046. Data are preliminary. Data do not include landings by U.S. -flag vessels at Puerto 
Rico and other ports outside the 50 States, or catches by U.S. -flag vessels transferred to 
internal water processing vessels (IWPs) in U.S. waters. Data do not include aquaculture 
products, except oysters and clams. 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



DISPOSITION OF U.S. 


DOMESTIC LANDINGS, 1996 AND 1997 




End Use 


1996 


1997 1 


Fresh and frozen: 

For human food 

For bait and 

animal food 

Total 


Million Percent, 
pgvinds 

6,752 70.6 
302 3.2 


Million 
pounds, 

6,558 
319 


Percent 
66.6 
3.2 


8,887 92.9 


9.198 


93.4 


Canned : 

For human food 

For bait and 

animal food 

Total 


,629 6.6 

49 0.5 


582 
66 


5.9 
0.7 


678 7.1 


648 


6.6 


Cured for human food 

Reduction to meal, 
oil, etc 


93 1.0 

1,740 18.2 


108 
2,213 


1.1 
22.5 


Grand total 


9,565 100.0 


9,846 


100.0 



-Data are preliminary. Table may not add due to rounding. 



DISPOSITION OF U.S. DOMESTIC LANDINGS. BY MONTH. 1997 



Month 



Landings for 
human food 



Landings for industrial 
purposes (1) 



January. . . . 
February. . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 
October. . . . 
November. . . 
December. . . 
Total. 



Million 

pwnds 

379 
1,378 
666 
390 
590 
425 
630 
621 
1,115 
638 
253 
163 



Percent 

5.2 
19.0 
9.2 
5.4 
8.1 
5.9 
8.7 
8.6 
15.4 
8.8 
3 .5 
2.2 



Million 
pounds 

86 

58 

42 

66 

241 

395 

370 

400 

422 

318 

111 

89 



Percent 

3.3 

2.2 

1.6 

2.5 

9.3 

15.2 

14.2 

15.4 

16.2 

12.2 

4.3 

3.4 



Million Percent 

POUnt^S 



7r248 



100.0 



2,598 



100.0 



465 

1,436 

708 

456 

831 

820 

1,000 

1,021 

1,537 

956 

364 

252 



9,846 



4.7 

14.6 

7.2 

4 .6 

8.4 

8.3 

10.2 

10.4 

15.6 

9.7 

3 .7 

2.6 



(1) Processed into meal, oil, solubles, and shell products, or used as bait and animal food. 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS OF FISH AND SHELLFISH, 1988-1997 (1) 



Landings for 


Landings for 


industrial 






human 


food 


purpose 


s (2) 




Total 


Million 


Million 


Millions 


Mill 


ion 


FlilliQUS 


Million 


ppvnds. 


dollar a 


Dounds 


aoii 


srs 


pounds 


dollar?. 


4,588 


3,362 


2,604 




158 


7,192 


3,520 


6,204 


3,111 


2,259 




127 


8,463 


3,238 


7,041 


3,366 


2,363 




156 


9,404 


3,522 


7,031 


3,169 


2,453 




139 


9,484 


3,308 


7,618 


3,531 


2,019 




147 


9,637 


3,678 


*8,214 


3,317 


2,253 




154 


10,467 


3,471 


7,936 


3,714 


2,525 




95 


10,461 


3,809 


7,667 


3,625 


2,121 




145 


9,788 


3,770 


7,474 


3,355 


2,091 




132 


9,565 


3,487 


7,248 


3,304 


2,598 




163 


9,846 


3,467 



1988. 
1989. 
1990. 
1991. 
1992. 
1993. 
1994. 
1995. 
1996. 
1997. 



(1) Statistics on landings are shown in round weight for all items except univalve and bivalve 
mollusks such as clams, oysters, and scallops, which are shown in weight of meats (excluding the 
shell) . All data are preliminary. (2) Processed into meal, oil, solubles, and shell products, 
or used as bait or animal food. * Record. Record--For industrial purposes 1983, 3,201 million lb. 
NOTE: --Data do not include landings outside the 50 States or products of aquaculture, except 
oysters and clams . 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



U.S. DOMESTIC LANDINGS. BY STATES. 1996 AND 1997 (1) 



Thousand 
pounds 

26,579 

5, 012,875 

460,681 

20,949 

5,958 

134, 038 

13,117 

31,870 

202 

303 

1,130,639 

236,567 

69,179 

236,550 

14,174 

584 

160,283 

11, 047 

179,306 

56,732 

193,828 

4,258 

264,113 

311 

136,708 

15,788 

91,593 

659,651 

391,741 

5,264 



ThousariS 
dollars 

38,342 

1,190,576 

187,461 

48,409 

4,397 

205,203 

21,114 

64,288 

415 

736 

267,286 

200, 930 

52,720 

231,380 

9,228 

221 

32,782 

13,531 

94,026 

83,527 

110,057 

1,984 

84,186 

274 

69,919 

24,067 

190,860 

106,016 

148,285 

4,493 



Thousand 
pounds 

23,076 

4,765, 002 

648,715 

19,396 

8,649 

114,727 

14,511 

36,568 

154 

158 

1,426,495 

244,059 

76,627 

229, 991 

15,874 

472 

177,782 

10,919 

168,289 

60,013 

229,729 

3,970 

273,503 

13 

138,693 

17,023 

85,650 

611,515 

438,567 

5,545 



Thouean3 

dollars 

38,311 

1,066,555 

178,336 

49,515 

5,325 

209,240 

27,400 

68,693 

241 

327 

318,822 

223,244 

64,321 

214,706 

9,623 

236 

41,972 

12,577 

97,898 

96,763 

101,729 

2,199 

80,423 

11 

74,813 

31,456 

203,137 

104, 998 

139,648 

4, 086 



Record Landings 

Thousand" 
Year 

1973 
1993 
1936 
1930 
1953 
1938 
1927 
1993 



1984 
1950 
1890 
1948 
1930 



1956 
1880 
1981 
1936 
1992 

1957 
1965 
1960 
1990 
1994 



Alabama 

Alaska 

California 

Connecticut . . . . 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi . . . . 
New Hampshire . . 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina. 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania. . . 
Rhode Island. . . 
South Carolina. 

Texas 

Virginia 

Washington 

Wisconsin 

Total. . . 



pounds 


36 


744 


5,905 


638 


1,760 


193 


88 


012 


367 


500 


241 


443 


47 


607 


34 


582 


(2) 




(2) 




1,931 


027 


356 


266 


141 


607 


649 


696 


35 


580 


(2) 




439 


518 


(2) 




540 


060 


335 


000 


432 


006 


31 


083 


256 


912 


(2) 




142 


080 


26 


611 


237 


684 


786 


794 


. 527 


804 


(2) 





3,564,888 



3,486,713 



9,845,685 



3,466,605 



(1) Landings are reported in round (live) weight for all items except univalve and bivalve 
mollusks such as clams, oysters, and scallops, which are reported in weight of meats (excluding 
the shell) . Landings for Mississippi River drainage area States are not available. 

(2) Data not available. 

NOTE:--Data are preliminary. Data do not include landings by U.S. -flag vessels at Puerto Rico 
and other ports outside the 50 States, or catches by U.S. -flag vessels transferred to internal 
water processing vessels (IWPs) in U.S. waters. Data do not include aquaculture products, 
except oysters and clams . 





U.S. DOMESTIC LANDINGS, 


BY REGIONS 


1996 AND 1997(1) 




Region 


1996 


1997 






Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 






pounds 


dollars 


pounds 


4ollsrs 


New England 




641,821 


564,169 


643,158 


574,854 


Middle Atlantic. 
Chesapeake 




241,936 
728,830 


181,869 
158,736 


236,951 
688,142 


199,986 
169,319 








268, 990 
1,496,875 


209,407 
680,304 


298,683 
1,790,310 


213,385 
758,682 


Gulf 




Pacific Coast 












and Alaska. . . . 




6,129,410 


1,610,508 


6,125,787 


1,464, 962 






25,156 
31,870 


17,432 
64,288 


26,185 
36,568 


16,724 
68,693 




Total 


9,554,888 


3,486,713 


3,845,784 


3,466,605 



(1) Landings are reported in round (live) weight for all items except univalve and bivalve 
mollusks such as clams, oysters, and scallops, which are reported in weight of meats (excluding 
the shell) . Landings for Mississippi River Drainage Area States are not available. 
NOTE: --Data are preliminary. Data do not include landings by U.S. -flag vessels at Puerto Rico 
and other ports outside the 50 States, or catches by U.S. -flag vessels tramsf erred to internal 
water processing vessels (IWPs) in U.S. waters. Data do not include aquaculture products, 
except oysters and clams . 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



COMMERCIAL FISHERY LANDINGS AND VALUE AT MAJOR U.S. PORTS, 1995-1997 



Quantity 



1995 I 1996 I 1997 
- Million pounds - 



- Million dollars 



Dutch Harbor-Unalaska, AK . . . 

Reedville, VA 

Empire- Venice, LA 

Cameron, LA 

Seattle, WA 

Kodiak, AK 

Intercoastal City, LA 

Morgan City-Berwick, LA .... 

Los Angeles, CA 

Pascagoula-Moss Point, MS . . . 

Beaufort -Morehead City, NC. . . 

Astoria, OR 

Port Hueneme-Oxnard-Ventura, CA 

Newport , OR 

New Bedford, MA 

Gloucester, MA 

Point Judith, RI 

Portland, ME 

Cape May-Wildwood, NJ 

Petersburg, AK 

Rockland, ME 

Ketchikan, AK 

Cordova, AK 

Moss Landings, CA 

Ocean City, MD 

Naknek-King Salmon, AK 

Atlantic City, NJ 

Wanchese- Stumpy Point, NC . . . 

Kenai , AK 

Seward, AK 

Crescent City, CA 

Dulac-Chauvin, LA 

Point Pleasant, NJ 

Westport, WA 

Monterery, CA 

Honolulu, HI 

San Francisco Area, CA 

Bellingham, WA 

Homer, AK 

Hampton Roads Area, VA 

Coos Bay-Charleston, OR. . . . 

Sitka, Ak 

Eureka, CA 

Key West, FL 

Provincetown- Chatham, MA. . . . 
Golden Meadow-Leeville, LA. . . 
Englehard-Swanquarter, NC . . . 
Delacroix- Yscloskey, LA .... 
Brownsville- Port Isabel, TX . . 
Fort Bragg, CA 

Montauk, NY 

Wrangell, AK 

Oriental -Vandemere, NC 

Ilwaco- Chinook, WA 

Hampton Bay-Shinnicock, NY. . . 

Grand Isle, LA 

Galveston, TX 

Belhaven-Washington, NC . . . . 

Bayou La Batre, AL 

Delcambre, LA 



684 


6 


579 


6 


(1 




(1 




298 


1 


316 


5 


280 





315 


7 


229 





241 


2 


362 


4 


202 


7 


179 


2 


199 





127 


4 


162 


9 


168 


S 


156 


9 


128 


6 


148 





87 





75 


4 


89 





107 





116 


8 


138 


9 


112 





115 





70 


5 


91 


4 


61 


3 


76 


9 


89 


6 


79 





66 


7 


78 


3 


75 


4 


82 


7 


83 





105 





44 


5 


52 


7 


116 


7 


136 


8 


42 


5 


55 


4 


13 


4 


25 


3 


12 


5 


(1 




120 


9 


(1 




42 


3 


40 


9 


39 





43 


4 


35 





37 


9 


24 


4 


29 


2 


21 


8 


26 


4 


123 


3 


38 


3 


22 


7 


22 


1 


24 





45 


6 


18 


6 


24 


9 


23 


9 


22 


9 


15 


7 


19 


2 


27 





21 


4 


23 


3 


21 


8 


12 


6 


11 


9 


21 





24 





31 





32 





15 


1 


18 





23 


4 


23 


7 


18 


4 


17 


8 


18 


7 


14 


1 


11 





15 





9 


3 


10 


1 


16 





22 





11 


8 


10 


9 


6 


4 


8 


9 


17 


2 


25 


1 


9 





14 





18 





23 


9 


11 


9 


11 


6 


12 


6 


13 


9 


17 





21 





10 





14 


2 


22 


1 


20 


4 


8 


6 


9 


3 



587.8 
491.9 
395. 9 
379.6 
336.1 
277.5 
270.8 
222.9 
168.2 
164.7 

128 .6 

114.8 

111 .9 

107.7 

83 .3 

81.5 

74 . 9 

74.8 

71.1 

70.1 

68.3 
65.2 
59.4 
44.6 
42.4 
41.5 
39.0 
38.1 
36.5 
32.8 



21.5 
21.3 
19.7 
18 .8 
16 .8 
15.1 
14.7 
13.9 
13 .8 
13.8 

13.6 
13.4 
13.2 
13.1 
12.9 
12.7 
12.5 
12.4 
12.1 
11.9 



Dutch Harbor-Unalaska, AK . . . 

New Bedford, MA 

Kodiak, AK 

Empire-Venice, LA 

Key West, FL 

Honolulu, HI 

Point Judith, RI 

Brownsville-Port Isabel, TX . . 

Portland, ME 

Dulac-Chauvin, LA 

Cameron, LA 

Kenai, AK 

Los Angeles, CA 

Palacios, TX 

Cape May-Wildwood, NJ 

Reedville, VA 

Petersburg, AK 

Sitka, Ak 

Hampton Roads Area, VA 

Seward, AK 

Naknek-King Salmon, AK 

Cordova, AK 

Bayou La Batre, AL 

Golden Meadow-Leeville, LA. . . 

Galveston, TX 

Wainchese-Stumpy Point, NC . . . 

Port Arthur, TX 

Beauf ort-Morehead City, NC. . . 

San Francisco Area, CA 

Gloucester, MA 

Gulfport, MS 

Astoria, OR 

Seattle, WA 

Port Hueneme-Oxnard-Ventura, CA 

Delcambre, LA 

Newport , OR 

Atlantic City, NJ 

Homer, AK 

Ketchikan, AK 

Westport, WA 

Morgan City-Berwick, LA .... 
Tampa Bay-St. Petersburg, FL. . 
Aransas Pass-Rockport, TX . . . 

Bellingham, WA 

Point Pleasant, NJ 

Fort Myers, FL 

Delacroix- Yscloskey, LA .... 

Grand Isle, LA 

Cape Canaveral , FL 

Intercoastal City, LA 

Freeport, TX 

Charleston-Mt . Pleasant, SC . . 

Crescent City, CA 

Montauk, NY 

Pascagoula-Moss Point, MS . . . 

Eureka, CA 

Apalachicola, FL 

Coos Bay-Charleston, OR. . . . 

Oriental -Vandemere, NC 

Darien-Bellville, GA 



146 


2 


118 


7 


86 


9 


104 


4 


105 


4 


82 


3 


51 


1 


45 


4 


66 


7 


62 


8 


46 


7 


47 


9 


43 


7 


46 





66 





60 





39 


4 


38 


6 


53 


4 


45 


2 


27 


8 


30 


6 


25 


3 


31 


6 


27 





36 


6 


21 





25 





30 


5 


30 


9 


(1 




(1 




44 


8 


36 


4 


32 


4 


33 





26 


6 


23 


7 


24 


3 


25 


5 


84 


3 


(1 




24 


9 


27 


8 


37 


5 


28 


6 


31 


3 


22 


1 


38 





37 





25 





24 


6 


22 





27 





35 





20 


3 


15 


4 


20 


4 


23 


2 


24 


3 


23 


3 


18 


2 


26 





28 





20 


3 


20 


6 


26 


8 


34 


8 


15 


5 


16 


4 


22 





25 





22 


2 


21 


6 


16 


3 


18 


9 


33 


6 


23 


7 


25 





31 





11 


3 


14 


2 


18 


2 


20 





33 





24 





15 





14 





11 


8 


13 


1 


15 


9 


19 


3 


12 


8 


10 


9 


17 


8 


18 


1 


16 


9 


17 


7 


10 


1 


11 


1 


15 





14 





19 





10 


8 


11 


5 


16 


8 


8 


5 


10 


1 


12 


3 


10 


4 


10 


3 


12 


3 


10 


2 


14 


1 


14 





16 





10 





13 


3 


11 





8 


7 



122 . 

103 . 



27.8 

27.6 
26.4 
25.8 
24 .8 
24.2 
24.0 
23.9 
23.7 
23.7 
23 .5 

23.1 



19.6 
19.6 

19.1 
17.6 
17.4 
17.2 
16 .8 
16 .0 
15 .8 
15.8 
15.6 
15.5 

15.2 



(11 Not available or confidential data. 



Notes: --To avoid disclosure of private enterprise certain leading ports have not been included. Seatt 
include fish caught by at-sea processing vessels. The record landings for quantity were 848.2 
Lob Angeles, CA in 1960 and for value were $224.1 million in Dutch Harbor-Hnalaska, AK in 1994. 



ndings 
on pounds 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



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20 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



DOMESTIC LANDINGS FOR U.S. TERRITORIAL POSSESSIONS, 1997 (1) 



Species 
Fish 



Araberjack 

iBallyhoo 

JBarracuda 

Dolphinfish 

jEmperors 

[Goatfish 

JGroupers 

iGrouper, red hind 

Grunts 

Hogfish 

Jacks, unclassified 

Mackerel, king and cero. 

Margate 

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iMojarra 

JMullet (black or silver) 

JNassau grouper 

Parrotfish 

Reef fish 

Sailfish 

Scup or porgy 

Scad, bigeye 

Sharks, other 

Snappers : 

Ehu 

Lane 

Lehi 

Mutton 

Onaga 

Opakapakas 

Silk 

Yellowtail 

Other 



Puerto Rico 



Po unds 



Total snappers. 



Snook 

Spanish sardine. . . . 

Squirrelf ish 

Surgeonf ishes 

JTarpon 

jTriggerf ish 

JTrunkfish (boxfish) 
I Tuna: 

Skipjack 

Yellowf in 

Unclassified 



Total tuna. 



48,256 

23,973 

166,477 

15,553 
48,797 
40,886 

150, 104 
61,004 
71, 420 

186,234 



20,009 

52,307 

10,123 

100,516 



23,507 
41,816 



259,064 
74,394 



196,494 

220,116 

66,900 



816,968 



51,421 
31,203 
17,946 

1,637 
53,586 
73,439 



199,283 



199,283 



Dollars 



53,443 

32,963 

238,311 

23, 446 

90,885 

80,749 

206,303 

122,009 

84,097 

268,177 



24, 861 

60,415 

16,247 

147,004 



33,439 
52,897 



Pounds 



388,596 
132,236 



444, 077 
393,457 
125,939 



1,484,305 



70,062 
30,501 
22,746 

360 

83,326 

137,514 



222,200 



222,200 





168 


2 


019 


95 


349 


2 


722 




12 


1 


047 



2,296 

52,581 

225 

1,605 

37,363 

1,054 

7,129 
25 



3,450 



3,450 



40 



53,652 

37,564 

3,829 



95, 045 



Dollars 



{Continued on next page) 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



21 



DOMESTIC LANDINGS FOR U.S. TERRITORIAL POSSESSIONS, 1997 (1) 




Species 


Puerto Rico 


Guam 




Pounds 

464,236 


Dollars 

518,084 


Pounds 

44,495 
1,977 


Dollars 

100,416 
3,911 


Other marine f inf ishes . . 
Freshwater fish, other.. 


Total, fish 


2,770,701 


4,104,344 


348, 602 


664,453 




Shellfish 


9,407 

214,284 

186,976 

791 

36,613 

6,986 


36,711 

853,387 

422,098 

920 

63,798 

17,517 


. 10 
583 

259 


39 
2,103 

871 




Conch (snail) meats 




Other shellfish 

Total, shellfish, 
et al 


455,057 


1,394,431 


852 


3,013 


Grand total. 


3,225,758 


5,498,775 


349,454 


667,466 


Species 


America 


n Samoa 


Northern Marianas 
Islands 


Fish 


Pounds 

63 

8,781 

36,881 

4,837 

5 

4,163 

53 

3,354 

40,818 

8 

5,779 

17, 131 

7,301 

90 

7,898 


Dollars 

127 

16,101 

55,394 

9,902 

6 

8,586 

66 

7,064 

51,022 

17 

11,465 

33,899 

10,952 

179 

8,798 

35,259 


Pounds 

221 
38,442 
29,226 
20,194 
11,082 

4,097 

8,632 

496 

14,410 

176,579 

124 

9,264 

32,357 


Dollars 

484 
80,300 
83,939 
41,558 
34,137 

13,579 

15,912 

1,256 

38,587 

403,635 

248 

28,711 

131,538 








Goatfish 






Jacks, unclassified 


Mullet (black or silver) 
Parrotfish 


Reef fish 


Sailfish 






Snappers : 

Ehu 


Lehi 


Onaga 


Yellowtail 




Other 


16,118 




Total snappers 


16,118 


35,259 


32,357 


131,538 



(Continued on next page) 



22 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



DOMESTIC LANDINGS FOR U.S. TERRITORIAL POSSESSIONS, 1997 (1) 



Species 



American Samoa 



Northern Marianas 
Islands 



FiBh 



Squirrelfish. . . 
Surgeonf ishes . . 
Triggerf ish . . . . 
Tuna: 

Albacore 

Bigeye 

Skipjack 

Yellowf in . . . . 

Unclassified. 



Total tuna. 



Wahoo 

Other marine finf ishes . 
Freshwater fish, other. 



Total, fiah 

Shallfiah 



Crabs, other 

Lobster, spiny.... 

Shrimp 

Octopus 

Other shellfish... 

Total, ahallfieh, 

at al 



Grand total . 



1,805 



35,043 

83,667 

633,966 



752, €76 



16,822 
5,963 



930, 546 



133 
1,626 



1,329 



932, 375 



DQllars 



Pounds 



3,683 



34,014 

64,259 

698,499 



796, 772 



25,234 
8,799 



1,083,325 



439 
4,924 



5,433 



1,088,758 



10,941 



141,076 
23,634 
16,305 



181, 015 



9, 115 

4,131 



550, 326 



1,250 



551, 576 



no1 1ars 

23,245 



307,377 
59,345 
35,986 



402, 708 



21,116 
9,374 



1,330,327 



1,927 



2,373 



4,300 



1,334, £27 



(1) Data in this table are preliminary and represent the latest information available. 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



23 



U.S. AQUACULTURE STATISTICS 
TOTAL U.S. PRODUCTION 



Millions of Pounds 
1,000 



800 
600 
400 
200 



l?3 



^ 



^ 



1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 



Impounds aDollars| 



Millions of Pounds 
500 



CATFISH production! 



300 



100 




I " I 

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 



^Pounds □ Dollars 



24 



U.S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 









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4J ^H .C O rH 



0) .d 




tn 




Id 


■s rr 


tn 


-H 


d 


4-1 


•rl 


Ii) 


MH 


() 


a 


4J 0) 


3 




-rH 


HI 


m ;s 


rH 


rH 


4-1 


g 


<u 


Id 


m 


11 


Id 


P. -- 


> 


O 


3 


C 


<u 




-rl 


Tl 


u 


to > 


T) 


I) 


O 


(1 


Id -H 


fi 


n 


^H 




rH 


Id 


Vh 


U< 


to 



4-1 0) 4-1 rH OX 

U r-i X Id rH U 

O O Cn 4-1 3 

Pjx; -rH d Tl to 

(U 3 0) Q) C 



tn 4-1 c to > to 



II) 


T3 T3 .i3 


S 


UJ 


P, C 3 01 


a 


t/J 


(U Id rH -rl 


Id 



:i u r-i u X e 

g a 

O rH -H <U U 

Tl vh Id X 



to 0) 


11) 





U X 




0) 


0) to 


[- 


c 


4-1 -rl 


<) 


Id 


to MH 


1) 




>. C 




rH 


O -H 




II) 


MH 


t/J 


u 



to Ti Id -H Tl ^ 



n (d Id 43 



2 d Id -H 





u a-H 


- X 




g s ■ 


to Cn 




■H to 


.Q -H 




^H T3 ^ 


Id 0) 




■ X <U 0) 


^ 3 




Cn to 4J rH 







a ^ Id 


4J 


M 


■H to (1) 


~ 


fl) 


Tl Id PjTI 


to C 


iJ 


a 0) 


p. 


Id 


3 X U TS 


4J 


3 


u a 


rH 3 


4J 


M 3 OJ Id 


rH ja 


rH 


to u 


Id 


Id 


Id to 


U OJ 



I 0) C O rH 

I 0) -H to - Id 

•• 3 U -rl to to > 

S 73 a) 4J a) rH 

CO a o u o d 

T) to 3 o (U 



Vj tn o 

P. O 4J 3 

4-1 d Tl 

a) Id o 

4J W to rH ^ 



XI >- d 
Id Id 0) 

rH g T3 



3 4J a P, -H 



Id 43 a) 
Id 4:: 

4-1 Eh 4J 



Id Vh Id fd 

Id MH Id 43 

o 

U ~ m 

0) m Q) U 

4-1 a) Id 3 

tn rH Cn o 

>< Id rH u 

o tn Id o 



26 



U. S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



SUMMARY OF COMMERCIAL WHITING (MERLUCCIUS SPP.) LANDINGS, 
BY STATE, 1950-97 (1) 



Year 


Maine 


New Hampshire 


Massachusetts 1 




Thousand 


Thws^nd 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Tjipusand 


Th9VS?qd 




PQvnds 


dollars 


Dounds 


d<?U?rg 


PQvnds 


d9H?rs 


1950 


15,616 


190 


- 


- 


48,831 


1,115 


1951 


19,576 


284 


- 


- 


97,974 


2,486 


1952 


23,328 


260 


- 


- 


81,202 


1,914 


1953 


12,668 


150 


- 


- 


71, 858 


1,398 


1954 


9,319 


116 


- 


- 


78,050 


1,646 


1955 


25, 128 


266 


- 


- 


81,884 


1,486 


1956 


14,835 


158 


- 


- 


72,445 


1,314 


1957 


15,810 


179 


- 


- 


107,972 


1,970 


1958 


23,577 


318 


- 


- 


81,066 


1,952 


1959 


23,339 


330 


- 


- 


83,134 


1,682 


1960 


11,123 


192 


_ 


- 


87,348 


1,950 


1961 


14,147 


237 


- 


- 


74,010 


1,616 


1962 


17,831 


274 


- 


- 


75,384 


1,656 


1963 


15,942 


242 


- 


- 


66,770 


1,563 


1964 


25,304 


374 


- 


- 


58,067 


1,263 


1965 


27,722 


486 


- 


- 


44, 903 


1,309 


1966 


29,699 


1,143 


- 


- 


51,482 


2,310 


1967 


20,726 


504 


- 


- 


37,812 


1,098 


1968 


28,916 


817 


15 


(2) 


40,495 


1,384 


1969 


17,890 


802 


22 


(2) 


18,359 


1,132 


1970 


14,837 


1,184 


18 


1 


21,591 


1,871 


1971 


9,900 


480 


15 


1 


15,077 


888 


1972 


4,095 


331 


24 


1 


11,228 


1,059 


1973 


5,517 


299 


9 


1 


25,475 


1,689 


1974 


2,869 


175 


IS 


1 


12,369 


1,007 


1975 


1,199 


72 


23 


2 


26,630 


2,239 


1976 


408 


29 


39 


3 


29,440 


2,376 


1977 


255 


17 


35 


3 


27,179 


2,301 


1978 


1,162 


109 


52 


5 


27,243 


3,769 


1979 


143 


15 


45 


4 


7,635 


1,392 


1980 


537 


60 


73 


7 


9,846 


1,644 


1981 


2,823 


330 


16 


2 


6,634 


1,326 


1982 


1,920 


258 


37 


5 


8,389 


1,493 


1983 


2,317 


328 


105 


17 


9,629 


1,220 


1984 


3,625 


323 


141 


20 


14,090 


1,558 


1985 


2,493 


276 


391 


87 


14,773 


2,685 


1986 


1, 931 


352 


188 


33 


16,559 


3,018 


1987 


1,281 


341 


159 


38 


10,777 


2,844 


1988 


2,143 


417 


153 


48 


8,990 


2,133 


1989 


759 


219 


126 


42 


6,276 


1,730 


1990 


264 


56 


227 


76 


8,781 


2,260 


1991 


127 


44 


173 


60 


8,726 


2,626 


1992 


102 


53 


185 


80 


7,940 


2,681 


1993 


61 


24 


142 


70 


5,457 


1,804 


1994 


1, 935 


527 


203 


79 


4,700 


1,624 


1995 


1,981 


629 


194 


76 


2,830 


1,025 


1996 


3,207 


1,175 


243 


97 


2,657 


905 


1997 


1,124 


319 


328 


113 


2,850 


1, 142 



See footnotes at end of table . 



U. S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



27 



SUMMARY OF COMMERCIAL WHITING (MERLUCCIUS SPP.) LANDINGS, 
BY STATE, 1950-97 (1) - Continued 



Year 


Connecticut 


Rhode 


Island 


New 


York 


1950 


Dounds 

362 
174 
193 
135 
224 
361 
150 
237 
142 
545 

708 
767 
533 
369 
396 
263 
147 
97 
136 
194 

88 

289 

82 

21 

26 

22 

34 

98 

168 

148 

20 
103 
101 
136 
106 
102 
152 
303 
377 
773 

525 
848 
1,260 
2,398 
1,889 
3,572 
5,644 
4,164 


Thousand 
dollars 

12 

13 

11 

7 

5 

9 

3 

7 

4 

15 

16 

19 

13 

10 

10 

8 

9 

3 

8 

14 

8 

16 

5 

2 

2 

2 

8 

13 

17 

20 

3 

20 

20 

22 

21 

20 

30 

103 

128 

131 

89 

144 

214 

408 

321 

1,426 

1, 944 

1,740 


Thousand 
P9Vn<^g, 

655 
742 
1,232 
704 
2,793 
3,257 
2,660 
2,293 
1,865 
3,126 

4,458 
5,021 
3,989 
3,477 
3,905 
2,489 
2,513 
1,270 
2,172 
2,836 

3,597 
2,910 
2,753 
3,094 
5,220 
5,347 
7,284 
5,495 
6,572 
8,334 

6,913 
10,141 
14,992 
13,608 
15,021 
13,282 
12,517 
13,327 
13,570 
15,261 

18,168 
16,103 
18,338 
15,442 
12,881 
9,889 
9,116 
11,640 


Thousand 
dcpll^rg 

21 
21 
33 
15 
68 
72 
67 
57 
51 
83 

104 
124 

96 

99 
104 

79 
147 

49 
120 
204 

322 
228 

285 
310 
463 
450 
530 
486 
824 
1,335 

1,162 
1,754 
2,919 
2,180 
2,316 
2,359 
2,487 
4,112 
2,744 
2,426 

3,645 
3,881 
3,968 
4,846 
4,297 
4, 010 
3,170 
4,524 


,Th<?U§?fia 
PPVndg 

1,363 
684 
823 
1,468 
2,172 
3,858 
1,540 
3,653 
2,020 
2,069 

3,593 
2,628 
2,723 
2,368 
3,123 
3,338 
2,008 
3,885 
3,311 
2,132 

1,020 
1,058 
2,631 
1,930 
1,955 
2,599 
2,546 
2,105 
4,712 
6,285 

5,222 
3,422 
3,232 
4,545 
4,619 
4,403 
2,364 
4,524 
4, 190 
9,059 

7,394 
6,105 
5,936 
12,200 
11,166 
11,365 
12,723 
11,943 


Th9V§?na 
dollar?, 

71 

49 

44 

115 

130 

165 

53 

151 

102 

104 

130 
113 
122 
111 
159 
161 
89 
212 
200 
134 

114 
95 
195 
211 
250 
345 
290 
358 
896 
1,166 

1,083 
1,083 
1,080 
1,270 
1,116 
1,412 
955 
2,321 
1,441 
2,859 

2,601 
2,464 
2,940 
5,900 
5,793 
5,725 
5,581 
6,314 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


19S0 




1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 




1968 


1969 


1970 


1971 




1973 




1975 


1976 


1977 




1979 


1980 




1982 




1984 


1985 


1986 


1987 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 




1993 


1994 


1995. 


1996 


1997 





See footnotes at end of table. 



28 



U. S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



SUMMARY OF COMMERCIAL WHITING (MERLUCCIUS SPP.) LANDINGS, 
BY STATE, 1950-97 (1) - Continued 



Year 


New Jersey | 


Delaware | 


Maryland 1 


1950 


pounds 

474 
897 
1,647 
2,754 
2,633 
4,339 
2,212 
3,007 
2,583 
2,484 

3, 821 
3,680 
3,913 
3,409 
3,271 
3,729 
4,520 
5,654 
4,045 
3,826 

3,301 
3,948 

5,440 

6,450 

7,022 

6,467 

7,915 

10,055 

11,108 

11,749 

11,822 
9,072 
7,102 
6,614 
8,415 
8, 988 
5,900 
4,183 
6,096 
8,200 

8,627 
4,422 
2,160 
2,638 
2,867 
2,783 
1,798 
2,072 


Thousand 
dollars 

36 

49 
102 
127 

75 
126 

84 
113 
128 
107 

127 
122 
157 
143 
154 
156 
255 
286 
254 
349 

382 

375 

453 

868 

587 

615 

743 

1,040 

1,558 

1,718 

2,004 
1,801 
1,875 
1,740 
1,484 
1,419 
1,341 
1,787 
1,695 
2,263 

2,377 
2,000 
1,024 
1, 016 
1,192 
1,307 
617 
869 


ThQussnd 

pounds 

1 
5 

1 
55 

1 

1 
1 

2 

8 
13 
9 
9 
5 
3 

4 


(2) 
(2) 

(2) 
2 

(2) 
(2) 

(2) 

1 

1 

1 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 

(2) 


Thousand 

pounds, 

4 

11 

1 

3 

27 

33 
49 
76 
96 

111 

66 

168 

190 

131 

109 

29 

59 

10 

34 

32 
6 

4 
21 
5 
6 
33 
11 
22 

14 

16 

11 

33 

26 

9 

3 

1 

6 

13 

22 

15 

2 

14 

3 

4 

2 


Thpussna 

dollars 

(2) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 

1 

1 
1 
2 
2 

2 
2 

4 
5 
3 

3 
1 
2 
1 
3 

4 

1 

1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 

1 
2 
3 
8 

5 
2 

1 

(2) 
1 
4 

7 
5 

1 
4 
1 
2 

1 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


I960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


1967 


1968 


1969 


1970 


1971 


1972 


1973 


1974 


1975 


1976 


1977 


1978 


1979 


1980 


1981 


1982 


1983 


1984 


1985 


1986 


1987 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 



See footnotes at end of table. 



U. S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



29 



SUMMARY OF COMMERCIAL WHITING (MERLUCCIUS SPP.) LANDINGS, 
BY STATE, 1950-97 (1) - Continued 



Year 


Virg 


inia 


North Carolina | 


Atlantic Total | 


1950 


Thousand 
pounds 

8 
17 
13 
34 
34 
46 
49 
19 
74 
344 

440 

407 

548 

117 

36 

20 

10 

40 

47 

35 

32 

94 

13 

12 

5 

7 

6 

37 

83 

152 

330 

494 

188 

79 

171 

57 

27 

66 

19 

44 

57 
30 

6 
12 
10 

8 
10 

5 


dollars 

(2) 
1 

(2) 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
3 

10 

14 
12 
18 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 
3 
3 

3 
7 
1 
3 
1 
1 

(2) 

3 

11 

24 

50 

54 

55 

16 

24 

10 

6 

22 

5 

7 

14 
9 
2 
3 
7 
3 
4 
2 


pounds 

3 

1 

286 
2 

2 
2 

14 

670 

3,149 

584 

18 

276 

63 

13 

15 

4 

5 

9 
2 

20 


Thousand 
dpll?rg 

(2) 
(2) 

34 
(2) 

(2) 
(2) 

- 
1 

83 

546 

102 

5 

41 

8 

3 

6 

1 

1 

2 

1 

5 


Ttiwssnd, 

pounds 

67,313 
120,075 
108,439 

89,625 

95,257 
118,873 

93, 924 
133,041 
111,403 
115,192 

111,602 
100,729 
105,089 
92,643 
94,233 
82,574 
90,408 
69,544 
79,148 
45,328 

44,516 
33,583 
26,268 
42,514 
29,513 
42,314 
47,687 
45,315 
51,116 
34,516 

35,451 
35,870 
36,556 
37,084 
46,490 
44,561 
39,654 
34,636 
35,548 
40,516 

44,074 
36,551 
35,929 
38,384 
35,654 
32,626 
35,398 
34,128 


TliPVS^nd 
d<?ll?rg 

1,445 
2,903 
2,364 
1,813 
2,042 
2,126 
1,682 
2,479 
2,560 
2,335 

2,535 
2,245 
2,340 
2,177 
2,068 
2,203 
3,955 
2,156 
2,787 
2,641 

3,889 
2,125 
2,330 
3,384 
2,489 
3,728 
3,981 
4,224 
7,190 
5,676 

6,097 
6,918 
7, 810 
6,806 
6,908 
8,278 
8,226 
11,574 
8,613 
9,682 

11,127 
11,234 
10,963 
14,080 
13,841 
14,203 
13,493 
15,024 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


I960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


1967 


1968 


1969 


1970 


1971 


1972 


1973 


1974 


1975 


1976 


1977 


1978 


1979 


1980 


1981 


1982 


1983 


1984 


1985 


1986 


1987 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 



See footnotes at end of table. 



30 



U. S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



SUMMARY OF COMMERCIAL WHITING (MERLUCCIUS SPP.) LANDINGS, 
BY STATE, 1950-97 (1) - Continued 



Year 


Washi 


ngton 


Oregon 


Call 


Eornia 


1950 

1951 


Thousand 

716 

1,528 

11,700 

28,786 

9,386 

8,529 

9, 009 
10,660 
4,184 
2,482 
5,197 
3,353 
3,739 
3,621 
6,379 
9,782 

11,350 

9,435 

13,334 

15,102 

8,884 

7,762 

3,372 

876 

776 

199 

11,074 
406,248 
319,606 
218,268 
396,874 
228,618 
268,553 
330,127 


Th9v§?n4 
dollars 

11 
16 
113 
233 
89 
68 

78 

122 

40 

37 

102 

48 

57 

64 

128 

162 

245 
203 
336 

432 

282 

260 

116 

50 

53 

14 

823 
21,455 
17,578 
7,576 
14,281 
10,597 
12,674 
19,938 


,Tl>(?vg?n(^ 
pounds 

50 

1,499 

65 

18 

6 

9 

78 

36 

6 

472 

972 

858 

305 

605 
360 
3 
143 
746 
1,950 
927 
403 
543 
196 

5,058 
29,109 
107,939 
78, 970 
143,563 
147,355 
155, 588 
155,511 


,T}i(pv§?nd 

at?ii?r§, 

1 
15 

1 
(2) 

(2) 

(2) 

4 

4 



19 

58 

56 

19 

42 
25 

24 
59 
173 
60 
34 
41 
15 

219 
1,373 
5,078 
2,289 
4,298 
7,000 
4,145 
6,823 


Thousand 
pgync^g, 

1 

25 

6 

104 

612 

959 

1,376 

1,149 

1,135 

1,097 

325 

3 

112 

119 

69 

14 

1 

10 
35 
11 
34 
32 
39 
29 
87 
748 
1,836 

1,528 
1,467 
2,257 
2,161 
5,148 
6,605 
6,575 
9, 960 
14,402 
16,089 

12,167 

15,197 

10,868 

6,835 

7,965 

9,018 

6,396 

13,960 


Th9vi?an4 
cjoll^rg, 

(2) 
(2) 
(2) 
2 
9 
14 
22 
19 
19 
22 

6 
(2) 

2 
2 

1 
(2) 

(2) 

(2) 
1 

(2) 
1 
2 
2 
1 
5 

66 
147 

109 
114 
181 
162 
341 
396 
384 
611 
1,076 
1,052 

784 
882 
597 
343 
354 
456 
239 
583 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


I960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


1967 


1968 


1969 


1970 


1971 


1972 


1973 


1974 


1975 


1976 


1977 


1978 


1979 


1980 


1981 


1982 


1983 


1984 


1985 


1986 


1987 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





See footnotes at end of table . 



U. S. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS 



31 



SUMMARY OF COMMERCIAL WHITING (MERLUCCIUS SPP.) LANDINGS, 
BY STATE, 1950-97 (1) - Continued 



Year 


Pacific Total 


Grand 


Total 


1950 

1951 


1 

25 

6 

104 

612 

959 

1,376 

1,149 

1,135 

1,097 

325 
3 

878 

3,146 

11,834 

28,818 

9,386 

8,530 

9,019 
10,701 
4,204 
2,594 
5,265 
3,398 
4,240 
4,680 
7,985 
11,923 

13,483 
11,262 
15,594 
17,406 
14,778 
16,317 
10,874 
11,239 
15,721 
16,484 

28,299 
450,554 
438,413 
304,073 
548,402 
384,991 
430,537 
499,598 


dollars 

(2) 
(2) 
(2) 
2 
9 
14 
22 
19 
19 
22 

6 
(2) 

14 
33 
115 
233 
89 
68 

78 

123 

40 

42 

108 
50 
77 
127 
250 
328 

396 
342 
517 
618 
682 
829 
560 
695 
1,170 
1,081 

1,826 
23,710 
23,253 
10,208 
18,933 
18,053 
17,058 
27,344 


67,314 
120,100 
108,445 

89,729 

95,869 
119,832 

95,300 
134,190 
112,538 
116,289 

111,927 

100,732 

105,089 

92,643 

95,111 

85,720 

102,242 

98,362 

88,534 

53,858 

53,535 
44,284 
30,472 
45,108 
34,778 
45,712 
51,927 
49,995 
59,101 
46,439 

48,934 
47,132 
52,150 
54,490 
61,268 
60,878 
50,528 
45,875 
51,269 
57,000 

72,373 
487,105 
474,342 
342,457 
584,056 
417,617 
465,935 
533,726 


Thousand 

1,445 
2,903 
2,364 
1,815 
2,051 
2,140 
1,704 
2,498 
2,579 
2,357 

2,541 
2,245 
2,340 
2,177 
2,082 
2,236 
4,070 
2,389 
2,876 
2,709 

3,967 
2,248 
2,370 
3,426 
2,597 
3,778 
4,058 
4,351 
7,440 
6,004 

6,493 
7,260 
8,327 
7,424 
7,590 
9,107 
8,786 

12,269 
9,783 

10,763 

12,953 
34,944 
34,216 
24,288 
32,774 
32,256 
30,551 
42,368 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


I960 




1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 




1968 


1969 


1970 

1971 




1973 


1974 


1975 


1976 


1977 




1979 


1980 


1982 




1984 


1985 


1986 




1988 




1990 

1991 




1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





(1) 



(2) 



The scientific name of Pacific whiting (hake) is Merluccius productus while Atlantic 
whiting (silver hake) are M. bilinearis and M. albidus . Florida landings of 
18,900 pounds and $1,512 for 1950 are not included in summary. The 1990-97 
Washington landings include fishes caught in the EEZ or other waters principally 
off the coasts of Washington and Oregon that are processed by ships at sea. 
Less than 500 lb or $500. 



32 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



DATA COLLECTION . Data on commercial 
fisheries were collected for many years, yet 
before 1 979 there was no continuous, systematic 
collection of marine recreational fishery data. 
Detailed information on marine recreational 
fishing is required to support a variety of fishery 
management and development purposes and is 
mandated by the Sustainable Fisheries Act, 
Public Law 94-265. In 1979, NMFS began the 
comprehensive Marine Recreational Fishery 
Statistical Survey (MRFSS). Data collected 
through the MRFSS show that recreational 
fisheries have tremendous impacts on fish stocks. 
For several important species recreational 
landings surpass commercial landings. 

The MRFSS consists of an intercept 
survey of anglers in the field and a telephone 
survey of coastal county households. The 
intercept survey collects data on species 
composition, catch rates, and fish lengths and 
weights. The telephone survey collects data on 
the number of marine fishing trips. These 
independent data are combined to produce 
estimates of catch, effort, and participation. 
Estimates are generated by subregion, state, 
wave (bimonthly sampling period), species, mode 
and primary area fished. In addition, economic 
and demographic data are also obtained. 

The MRFSS is being conducted in 1998 
along the coast of the entire continental United 
States except the state of Texas. Sampling 
coverage varies across the time series (see 
figures). Detailed information and the ability to 
access data are available on the Fisheries 
Statistics and Economics web page 
(www.st.nmfs.gov/st1). Data from other NMFS 
and state surveys (SE head boats, Texas, 
California Passenger Fishing Vessels, 
OregonA/Vashington ocean boats. Pacific salmon, 
Alaska) are not included in this report. 

DATA TABLES . The estimated number of fish 
caught and weight of the harvest are presented 
for 64 commonly caught species. The estimated 
number caught includes a) fish brought ashore in 



whole form that were identified, weighed, and 
measured; and b) fish that were not available for 
identification. The latter type includes fish used 
for bait, discarded, filleted or released alive. 
Harvest does not include fish that were released 
alive. Estimated catch and harvest is presented 
by subregion and primary fishing area: inland 
[sounds, rivers, bays], state territorial seas [ocean 
to 3 miles from shore, except for Florida's Gulf 
coast, where state territorial seas extend 1 miles 
from shore], and Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) 
[ocean from the edge of the state territorial seas 
to 200 miles from shore]. The total number of 
estimated trips and participants are presented by 
state. 

All estimates are shown with proportional 
standard errors (PSE). The PSE's express the 
standard error of an estimate as a percentage of 
the estimate and are a measure of precision. A 
95% confidence interval indicates a 95% certainty 
that the true value lies between the lower and 
upper limits. The 95% confidence intervals are 
calculated as: 1) the lower limit is the estimate 
minus 1 .96 times the standard error, and 2) the 
upper limit is the estimate plus 1.96 times the 
standard error. For example, if the estimated trips 
equal 64 million with a PSE of 1 %, then the upper 
confidence interval would be 65,254,400 (64 
million + (1.96X640,000)). 

1997 MRFSS DATA . In 1997, almost 9 million 
people made 68 million marine recreational 
fishing trips to the Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific 
coasts. The estimated marine recreational finfish 
catch was 366 million fish. Over 50% percent of 
the catch was released alive. The estimated total 
weight of the harvest was 234 million pounds. 

The Atlantic and Gulf coasts accounted 
for 79% of the participants, 90% of the fishing 
trips, and 92% of the marine recreational finfish 
catch. Most ( 57%) of the catch came from inland 
waters, 32% from state territorial seas, and 1 1 % 
from the EEZ. The distribution is different for the 
Atlantic and Gulf coasts versus the Pacific coast. 
On the Atlantic and Gulf the majority of the catch 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



33 



was from inland waters, while on the Pacific coast 
the majority was from the state territorial seas. 



ATLANTIC AND GULF . The estimated number 
of Atlantic and Gulf coast trips made between 
1 993 and 1 997 remained at about 58 million. The 
estimated number of people engaged in marine 
recreational fishing on the Atlantic and Gulf coast 
ranged from a low of 6.6 million in 1 996 to a high 
of 7.6 million in 1994. In 1997, 7 million marine 
recreational fishing participants took 61 million 
trips and caught a total of 337 million fish. By 
subregion, the Gulf of Mexico accounted for the 
highest numbers of fish caught (45%) followed by 
the Mid-Atlantic (31%). Thirty percent of the 
recreational fishing trips were made in the South 
Atlantic, 30% in the Gulf of Mexico, 28% in the 
Mid-Atlantic, and 12% in the North Atlantic. 

The most commonly caught non-bait 
species (numbers of fish) were spotted seatrout, 
Atlantic croaker, summer flounder, striped bass, 
black sea bass, and bluefish. Top-ranked non- 
bait species (catch in numbers) by subregion 
were striped bass in the North Atlantic, summer 
flounder in the Mid-Atlantic, bluefish in the South 
Atlantic, and spotted seatrout in the Gulf of 
Mexico. By weight, the largest harvests were 
dolphin, striped bass, bluefish, red drum, king 
mackerel, summerflounder, and spotted seatrout. 
The average weight for all fish combined was 1 .6 
pounds while the average weights for the top 
species were 2.6 pounds for bluefish, 10.1 for 
striped bass, 5.1 for red drum, 10.1 for dolphin, 
1.1 for spotted seatrout, 1 .8 for summerflounder, 
and 10.1 for king mackerel. 

The catch of striped bass increased 
steadily and dramatically since 1 990 with a record 
catch of over 17 million fish in 1997. Over 91% 
of striped bass were released alive in 1997. 
Spotted seatrout, summer flounder, Atlantic 
croaker and black sea bass catches remained 
relatively steady from 1993-1997. Bluefish 
catches increased from 10 million in 1995 and 
1 996 to 1 3 million in 1 997. 



Eleven percent of the catch on the 
Atlantic and Gulf coasts came from the EEZ. The 
most commonly caught species in federally 
managed waters were black sea bass, Atlantic 
mackerel, dolphin, red snapper, Atlantic croaker, 
summer flounder and bluefish. 



PACIFIC. In 1 997, 1 .8 million marine recreational 
fishing participants took 7.2 million trips and 
caught a total of 29 million fish. Seventy-two 
percent of the trips were made in California, 
followed by 20% in Washington, and 8% in 
Oregon. 

The most commonly caught non-bait 
species (numbers of fish) were Pacific (chub) 
mackerel, surf smelt, white croaker, kelp bass 
and barred sand bass. The largest harvests were 
California halibut. Pacific mackerel. Pacific 
barracuda, black rockfish, barred sandbass, and 
lingcod. The average weight for all fish combined 
was 0.9 pounds. Average weights for some of the 
top species were: 9.0 pounds for California 
halibut, 0.9 pounds for Pacific (chub) mackerel, 
2.0 pounds for black rockfish, 1 .5 pounds for 
barred sandbass, and 7.1 pounds for lingcod. 

Surf smelt jumped from the 1993-1995 
average of a little over a million fish to almost 5 
million fish in 1996. California halibut catch has 
shown no real trend since 1 993, ranging from a 
low of 347,000 fish in 1 993 to a high of 924,000 
fish in 1 997. Pacific mackerel reached a 4-year 
high in 1 996 with 6.0 million fish caught. 

Seven percent of the total marine 
recreational catch on the Pacific coast came from 
the EEZ. The most commonly caught Pacific 
coast species in federally managed waters were 
Pacific mackerel, barred sand bass, yellowtail 
rockfish, blue rockfish. Pacific barracuda, kelp 
bass, and white croaker. The percent of the 
catch from the state territorial sea was about 60% 
in 1 997, while the inland catch increased from 1 3- 
1 7% in the early 1 990's to 33% for 1 997. 



34 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



MRFSS Sampling Coverage by Wave, State, and Mode, 1979-1997. 



Atlantic and Gulf Coast 



Wave 1 ME-TX 

Wave 1 FL-TX 

Wave 1 FL-LA 

Wave 1 GA 

Wave 1 SC 

Wave 1 NC 

Waves 2-5 ME-TX 

Waves 2-5 ME-LA 

Waves 2-5 MA-LA 

Waves 3-5 ME-NH 

Wave 6 MA-TX 

Wave 6 MA-LA 

Wave 6 ME-NH 

TX Shore 

TX Boats 

NC-TX Partyboats 



80 



85 



90 



95 



Pacific Coast 

Wave 1 WA-CA 

Wave 1 WA-CA 

Wave 1 OR-CA 

Wave 1 CA 

Wave 2-5 WA-CA 

Wave 2-5 OR-CA 

Wave 2-5 WA-CA 

Wave 6 WA-CA 

Wave 6 OR-CA 

Wave 6 CA 

Wave 6 OR 

Wave 6 WA-CA 



Note: Salmon trips are excluded on the Pacific coast. Ocean-boat trips were excluded in 
WA in 1989 and in Oregon during July-August duhngi 987-1 989 and 1993-1997. 



80 85 90 




95 
















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r^ 




^o 
























rH 








r-\ 


























UJ 
















UJ 
































c 

2 


CL 














o 

> 


CL 














(5 








c5 

> 












00 

o 


O 


00 


00 in 


00 


O 
00 


CTl 
rH 


CN 


00 

in 














(0 

LU 




U3 


\o 


VU 


lo oo 






0) 

UJ 




rH 


n 

•« 


O 




CN 
































































(0 

> 








■ 


U) c- 


> 








• 


.0 


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■ 








ri 




<* in VD t- 


•^ in vo r- 




























tr, 


CTl (ji en en 














CT, 


m 


(T> 


m Ol 






















(y\ <y\ o\ 'j\ 














iH 












■-1 


•-I 


"-I 


'-' 


■-1 






'-' 


rH rH rH rH 






^ 


rH rH rH rH 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



37 



ESTIMATED NUMBER OF PEOPLE PARTICIPATING IN MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHING 
AND PSE (%) BY STATE AND YEAR, 1993-1997 FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 



Year 


Pacific Coast sub-region 




1 


So. California 


No. California 


Oregon 


Washington 


Total(1) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSEr/o) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est iPSE(%) 


1993. . . 






Number O' thnii.<;anH.<5 






985 


6 


620 


7 


300 


8 


na 


na 


1,661 


4 


1994. . . 


1,285 


6 


449 


7 


216 


7 


na 


na 


1,671 


4 


1995. . . 


1,063 


7 


634 


7 


249 


7 


na 


na 


1,678 


4 


1996. . . 


958 


10 


523 


7 


219 


11 


447 


9 


1,783 


4 


1997. . . 


905 


5 


581 


5 


247 


6 


359 


6 


1,815 


3 



(1) Sub-region totals do not include out of state anglers since they can be counted multiple times, 
therefore, the sum of participants across states will not equal totals shown in the last column. 
Note:"Est = Estimate. PSE {%) = Proportional standard error. 
NA = Not available {Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey not conducted in Washington from 1993-1995). 



ESTIMATED NUMBER OF MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHING TRIPS AND PSE(%) BY 
STATE AND YEAR, 1993-1997 FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 



Year 


Pacific Coast sub-reoion 




1 


So. California 


No. California 


Oregon 


Washington 


Total(l) 


Est 1 PSEf%) 


Est IPSEf%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSEf%^ 


Est IPSE(%^ 






...... Miimhor r\f th,.MioonHc. 




1993. . . 

1994. . . 

1995. . . 

1996. . . 

1997. . . 


4,038 
4,748 
4,300 
3,682 
3,232 


4 
4 
4 
4 

4 


2,152 
1,968 
2,340 
1,934 
1,906 


5 
6 
5 
4 
5 


704 
471 
579 
491 
593 


6 
5 
5 
8 
7 


NA 
NA 
NA 
1,658 
1,455 


NA 

NA 

NA 

9 

6 


6,893 
7,187 
7,220 
7,765 
7,187 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Note:--Est = Estimate. PSE (%) = Proportional standard error. 

NA= Not available (Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Sun/ey not conducted in Washington from 1993-1995). 



ESTIMATED NUMBER OF PEOPLE PARTICIPATING IN MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHING 
AND PSE (%) BY COAST AND YEAR, 1993-1997 U.S. TOTALS 



Year 


1 1 .q Tntpl.«; 




1 


Atlantic Coast 


Gulf of Mexico 


Pacific Coast 


Total 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


1993 

1994 

1995 

1996 


5,186 
5,691 
5,022 
4,801 
4,963 


3 
2 
2 
3 
2 


1,877 
1,931 
2,009 
1,818 
2,029 


Number c 

3 
2 
2 
3 
2 


)f thousands 

1,661 
1,671 
1,678 
1,783 
1,815 


4 
4 
4 
4 
3 


8,724 
9,293 
8,709 
8,402 
8,807 


2 
2 
2 
2 
1 


1997 





Note: Est = Estimate. PSE(%) = Proportional standard error. Totals only include continental U.S. 
Texas data not included for all years and Washington not inlcuded for 1993-1995. 



ESTIMATED NUMBER OF MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHING TRIPS AND PSE(%) BY 
COAST AND YEAR, 1993-1997 U.S. TOTALS 



Year 



Atlantic Coast 



Est I PSE(%T 



U.S. Totals 



Gulf of Mexico 



Est 



PSE(%1 



Pacific Coast 



Est I PSE(%) 



Total 



Est |PSE(%; 



1993. 
1994. 
1995. 
1996. 
1997. 



38,311 
42,446 
40,843 
40,081 
42,850 



17,431 
17,504 
17,115 
16,319 
18,103 







3 


62,635 




1 


6,893 


1 


1 


7,187 


3 


67,137 


1 


1 


7,220 


3 


65,178 


1 


2 


7,765 


3 


64,165 


1 


2 


7,187 


3 


68,140 


1 



Note: Est = Estimate. PSE(%) = Proportional standard error. Totals only include continental U.S. 
Texas data not included for all years and Washington not inlcuded for 1993-1995. 



38 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) AND PSE (%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1993-1997 FOR THE 

ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 



Year 


Atlantic cod 






North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Total 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est |PSE{%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 






Numbers in thousands 




1993. . . 


2,270 


11 


423 


15 














2,693 


10 


1994. . . 


1,749 


8 


112 


23 














1,861 


8 


1995. . . 


1,747 


15 


195 


19 














1,942 


14 


1996. . . 


1,061 


10 


19 


24 














1,080 


10 


1997. . . 


841 


14 


22 


21 














863 


14 


Year 


Atlantic croaker 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est jPSE (%) 






Numbers in thousands 




1993. . . 








14,136 


6 


2,921 


5 


3,959 


7 


21,016 


5 


1994. . . 








17,472 


5 


5,753 


5 


3,445 


6 


26,671 


3 


1995. . . 

1996. . . 

1997. . . 












12,246 
12,082 
18,059 


6 
6 

7 


2,970 
2,245 
2,698 


7 
5 
6 


2,537 
2,539 
3,468 


6 
7 
6 


17,753 
16,867 
24,225 


4 
5 
5 


Year 


Atlantic mackerel 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est Ipse (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est jPSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 






Numbers in thousan 


as 




1993. . . 


2, 161 


10 


144 


35 














2,307 


10 


1994. . . 


4,690 


12 


170 


44 














4,860 


12 


1995. . . 


2,934 


13 


1,074 


35 














4,008 


13 


1996. . . 


3,001 


10 


647 


26 


1 


55 








3,650 


9 


1997. . . 


3,524 


13 


1,434 


17 





100 








4,959 


11 


Year 


Black drum 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 






Numbers in thousan 


js 




1993. . . 








12 


34 


253 


9 


1,268 


9 


1,534 


7 


1994. . . 








4 


41 


297 


8 


824 


3 


1,125 


6 


1995. . . 








27 


23 


505 


10 


1,063 


8 


1,595 


6 


1996. . . 








22 


29 


355 


8 


818 


7 


1,196 


6 


1997. . . 








9 


38 


326 


9 


1,344 


8 


1,678 


6 


Year 


Black sea bass 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE {%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 






Numbers in thousan 


JS 




1993. . . 


67 


14 


8,898 


14 


1,418 


7 


2,375 


7 


12,758 


10 


1994. . . 


33 


38 


6,995 


7 


2,131 


6 


2,735 


6 


11,892 


4 


1995. . . 


122 


12 


13,841 


7 


1,660 


6 


2,170 


6 


17,793 


6 


1996. . . 


195 


13 


9,807 


7 


1,312 


7 


1,435 


7 


12,750 


6 


1997. . . 


128 


16 


8,126 


6 


1,717 


6 


1,805 


8 


11,776 


4 



(1 ) Gulf of Mexico estimates do not include Texas data. 

Notei-Est = estimate. PSE (%) = Proportional standard error. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



39 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) AND PSE (%) BY 
MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1993-1997 FOR THE 






ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 




Year 


Bluefish 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 






Numbers in thousands 




1993. . . 


2,425 


5 


4,516 


5 


2,984 


4 


376 


12 


10,301 


3 


1994. . . 


2,220 


6 


6,190 


6 


3,510 


4 


484 


12 


12,405 


3 


1995. . . 


2,022 


6 


5,113 


5 


3,341 


5 


464 


12 


10,940 


3 


1996. . . 


2,810 


7 


5,135 


5 


1,954 


4 


471 


12 


10,370 


3 


1997. . . 


2,579 


6 


6,163 


5 


3,584 


4 


602 


10 


12,927 


3 


Year 


Dolphin 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est iPSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 






Numbers in thousands 




1993. . . 


18 


29 


246 


22 


951 


5 


675 


11 


1,927 


5 


1994. . . 


1 


54 


86 


20 


1,680 


7 


653 


11 


2,450 


6 


1995. . . 


11 


60 


74 


21 


1,523 


4 


963 


8 


2,613 


4 


1996. . . 


1 


100 


199 


35 


1,233 


5 


461 


9 


1,905 


5 


1997. . . 





53 


31 


42 


1,356 


7 


1,058 


11 


2,444 


6 


Year 


Gag 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est [PSE (%) 










- Numbers in thousan 












3§. 






1993. . . 














86 


19 


1,652 


6 


1,738 


6 


1994. . . 














137 


15 


2,095 


5 


2,232 


5 


1995. . . 














123 


12 


2,416 


5 


2,539 


5 


1996. . . 














96 


12 


1,494 


5 


1,590 


5 


1997. . . 














90 


14 


2,074 


5 


2,164 


5 


Year 


Gray snapper 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE{%) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 






Numbers in thousanc 


is 




1993. . . 














745 


7 


4,408 


4 


5,154 


4 


1994. . . 














1,312 


8 


3,534 


5 


4,845 


4 


1995. . . 














1,315 


12 


3,237 


5 


4,552 


5 


1996. . . 














1,084 


8 


3,330 


6 


4,413 


5 


1997. . . 














1,487 


10 


3,840 


5 


5,327 


4 


Year 


Gray triggerfish 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 






.Numbers in thousanc 


Is 




1993. . . 


1 


52 


89 


23 


154 


13 


661 


8 


906 


7 


1994. . . 


1 


53 


31 


27 


115 


10 


686 


8 


834 


6 


1995. . . 





100 


38 


28 


131 


13 


661 


8 


830 


7 


1996. . . 


1 


50 


106 


34 


162 


12 


392 


8 


662 


8 


1997. . . 


3 


82 


63 


28 


153 


14 


357 


8 


576 


7 



(1 ) Gulf of Mexico estimates do not include Texas data. 

Note:~Est = estimate. PSE (%) = Proportional standard error. 



40 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) AND PSE (%) BY 

MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1993-1997 FOR THE 

ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 



Year 


Greater amberjack 






North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Total 


Est |PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 






Numbers in thousands 




1993. . . 








694 


19 


67 


12 


380 


10 


1,141 


12 


1994. . . 








1 


52 


98 


13 


233 


11 


332 


9 


1995. . . 








2 


73 


35 


16 


126 


14 


164 


11 


1996. . . 








25 


37 


90 


13 


142 


9 


258 


8 


1997. . . 








2 


100 


47 


18 


95 


14 


144 


11 


Year 


King mackerel 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 






Numbers in thousands 




1993. . . 








17 


40 


506 


5 


500 


6 


1,023 


4 


1994. . . 








5 


47 


461 


6 


682 


6 


1,148 


4 


1995. . . 








1 


61 


628 


6 


622 


6 


1,252 


4 


1996. . . 








2 


59 


485 


5 


748 


7 


1,235 


4 


1997. . . 








23 


42 


704 


5 


643 


7 


1,369 


4 


Year 


Red drum 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 






Numbers in thousands 




1993. . . 








64 


36 


1,274 


7 


6,310 


4 


7,649 


4 


1994. . . 








12 


32 


1,683 


6 


5,913 


4 


7,609 


3 


1995. . . 








36 


37 


2,105 


7 


7,096 


4 


9,236 


3 


1996. . . 








3 


40 


1,130 


6 


5,952 


3 


7,085 


3 


1997. . . 








118 


35 


1,243 


6 


7,007 


4 


8,367 


3 


Year 


Red snapper 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 






Numbers in thousanc 


ds. 




1993. . . 














87 


23 


2,458 


5 


2,546 


5 


1994. . . 














95 


21 


1,916 


6 


2,011 


5 


1995. . . 














69 


16 


1,539 


6 


1,609 


6 


1996. . . 














34 


24 


1,700 


6 


1,733 


6 


1997. . . 














48 


35 


2,924 


5 


2,972 


5 


Year 


Sand seatrout 




Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE{%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 






.Numbers in thousanc 


Js. 




1993. . . 




















4,068 


7 


4,068 


7 


1994. . . 




















5,665 


5 


5,665 


5 


1995. . . 




















4,355 


7 


4,355 


7 


1996. . . 




















4,624 


6 


4,624 


6 


1997. . . 




















3,248 


9 


3,248 


9 



(1) Gulf of Mexico estimates do not include Texas data. 

Note:~Est = estimate. PSE {%) = Proportional standard error. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



41 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) AND PSE (%) BY 

MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1993-1997 FOR THE 

ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS - Continued 



Year 


Scup 






North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Total 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 






Numbers in thousand^ 




1993. . . 


4,337 


8 


2,723 


8 


17 


24 








7, 077 


6 


1994. . . 


2,431 


7 


3,192 


13 


39 


41 








5,662 


8 


1995. . . 


2,572 


7 


1,111 


20 


5 


27 








3,688 


8 


1996. . . 


3,533 


9 


1,321 


13 


4 


34 








4,858 


7 


1997. . . 


1,835 


11 


996 


17 


11 


40 








2,842 


9 


Year 


Sheepshead 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est jPSE (%) 










- Numbers in thousands 








1993. . . 








1 


74 


1,263 


14 


4,329 


5 


5,593 


5 


1994. . . 








4 


78 


1,715 


8 


2,663 


5 


4,383 


5 


1995. . . 








14 


42 


1,538 


8 


3,552 


6 


5,118 


5 


1996. . . 








2 


59 


944 


6 


2,593 


5 


3,542 


4 


1997. . . 








22 


71 


783 


8 


3,024 


6 


3,829 


5 


Year 


Southern flounder 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 










- Numbers in thousanc 


ds. 








1993. . . 








2 


73 


509 


6 


572 


8 


1,083 


5 


1994. . . 














830 


6 


539 


7 


1,369 


4 


1995. . . 














740 


7 


706 


6 


1,446 


5 


1996. . . 








1 


59 


454 


7 


738 


7 


1,192 


5 


1997. . . 








43 


31 


599 


6 


625 


7 


1,267 


5 


Year 


Spanish mackerel 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est IPSE {%) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 






Numbers in thousanc 


Js 




1993. . . 


1 


62 


197 


14 


949 


6 


2,506 


6 


3,653 


4 


1994. . . 








341 


13 


1,502 


6 


2,007 


5 


3,850 


4 


1995. . . 








147 


23 


847 


6 


1,574 


9 


2,568 


6 


1996. . . 








100 


35 


1,069 


6 


1,818 


7 


2,988 


5 


1997. . . 








91 


34 


1,299 


6 


2,066 


7 


3,456 


5 


Year 


Spot 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est |PSE{%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 






Numbers in thousanc 


Is. 




1993. . . 








7,713 


8 


5,562 


7 


988 


33 


14,263 


6 


1994. . . 








8,815 


5 


9,449 


6 


227 


33 


18,491 


4 


1995. . . 








5,343 


8 


6,039 


6 


185 


29 


11,567 


5 


1996. . . 








2,668 


10 


4,630 


9 


66 


27 


7,364 


7 


1997. . . 








6,916 


10 


2,827 


8 


103 


75 


9,846 


7 



(1) Gulf of Mexico estimates do not include Texas data. 

Note:-Est = estimate. PSE (%) = Proportional standard error. 



42 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) AND PSE (%) BY 

MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1993-1997 FOR THE 

ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS - Continued 



Year 


Spotted seatrout 






North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Total 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est jPSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 






Numbers in thousands 




1993. . . 








176 


16 


2,336 


5 


19,026 


3 


21,538 


3 


1994. . . 








425 


11 


2,319 


6 


19,438 


3 


22,181 


3 


1995. . . 








579 


19 


3,425 


5 


20,610 


3 


24,615 


3 


1996. . . 








304 


19 


1,976 


5 


18,282 


3 


20,563 


3 


1997. . . 








285 


15 


2,370 


6 


23,139 


3 


25,794 


3 


Year 


Striped bass 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE{%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE (%) 






Numbers in thousands 




1993. . . 


1,692 


9 


3,080 


9 


13 


40 


15 


25 


4,900 


6 


1994. . . 


3,243 


7 


5,241 


9 


22 


23 


15 


34 


8,636 


6 


1995. . . 


5,190 


7 


5,405 


8 


63 


13 


30 


30 


10,839 


5 


1996. . . 


6,799 


8 


6,987 


7 


297 


9 


18 


24 


14,101 


5 


1997. . . 


8,757 


5 


7,836 


7 


395 


8 


21 


39 


17,009 


4 


Year 


Summer flounder 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 






Numbers in thousands 




1993. . . 


551 


9 


21,815 


4 


553 


7 








22,919 


4 


1994. . . 


1,019 


7 


16,317 


4 


404 


7 








17,741 


3 


1995. . . 


833 


9 


15,244 


4 


162 


9 








16,239 


4 


1996. . . 


1,426 


7 


17,981 


3 


394 


7 








19,801 


3 


1997. . . 


1,698 


9 


17,249 


4 


304 


8 








19,251 


3 


Year 




Tautog 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 






Numbers in thousam 


3s- 




1993. . . 


718 


8 


3,491 


7 


5 


22 








4,215 


6 


1994. . . 


729 


10 


1,921 


8 


3 


32 








2,653 


7 


1995. . . 


583 


11 


3,228 


8 


4 


31 








3,816 


7 


1996. . . 


547 


9 


1,726 


8 


7 


31 








2,279 


6 


1997. . . 


387 


11 


1,245 


8 


12 


42 








1,643 


6 



(1) Gulf of Mexico estimates do not include Texas data. 

Note:-Est = estimate. PSE (%) = Proportional standard error. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



43 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (WITH RELEASED ALIVE) AND PSE (%) BY 

MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, SUB-REGION, 1993-1997 FOR THE 

ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS - Continued 



Year 


Vermilion snapper 






North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Total 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 






Numbers in thousands 




1993. . . 














139 


17 


1,090 


8 


1,228 


7 


1994. . . 














119 


13 


706 


9 


826 


8 


1995. . . 














171 


23 


1,029 


8 


1,200 


8 


1996. . . 














110 


18 


357 


9 


467 


8 


1997. . . 














117 


18 


348 


14 


465 


11 


Year 


Weakfish 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE{%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 






Numbers in thousands 




1993. . . 


2 


43 


1,828 


7 


388 


10 








2,219 


6 


1994. . . 


1 


100 


4,290 


6 


638 


9 








4,929 


5 


1995. . . 


2 


53 


5,359 


6 


378 


10 








5,739 


5 


1996. . . 


1 


53 


7,250 


5 


343 


10 








7,594 


5 


1997. . . 


3 


46 


5,850 


5 


601 


8 








6,455 


5 


Year 


Winter flounder 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE(%) 










- Numbers in thpusam 


















1993. . . 


651 


9 


2,930 


23 














3,582 


19 


1994. . . 


486 


9 


1,814 


13 














2,300 


11 


1995. . . 


473 


14 


1,851 


10 














2,324 


9 


1996. . . 


400 


10 


2,514 


14 














2,913 


12 


1997. . . 


556 


13 


1,340 


13 














1,896 


10 


Year 


All fishes 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est IPSE (%) 


Est [PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(7o) 


Est IPSE (%) 










- Numbers in thousanc 


Js 








1993. . . 


20,991 


3 


97,574 


2 


50,887 


2 


147,332 


2 


316,784 


1 


1994. . . 


25,880 


8 


94,945 


2 


72,173 


1 


148,856 


3 


341,854 


1 


1995. . . 


21,983 


5 


88,522 


2 


65,240 


1 


135,781 


3 


311,526 


1 


1996. . . 


23,427 


4 


86,419 


2 


51,257 


2 


118,625 


2 


279,728 


1 


1997. . . 


23,781 


3 


96,548 


2 


58,295 


1 


39,819 


2 


318,443 


1 



(1) Gulf of Mexico estimates do not include Texas data. 

Note:-Est = estimate. PSE (%) = Proportional standard error. 



44 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1993-1997 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 



Year 


Atlantic cod 




i 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf Of Mexico (1) 


Total 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE (%) 








-¥-L,- ^ J 


s of pound! 


















1993 . . . 


5,190 


17 


1,949 


20 














7,139 


14 


1994. . . 


4, 083 


25 


203 


27 














4,285 


24 


1995. . . 


3,437 


20 


1,164 


17 














4,601 


16 


1996. . . 


3,260 


21 


72 


27 














3,332 


20 


1997. . . 


2, 550 


25 


71 


11 














2,622 


24 


Year 


Atlantic croaker 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf Of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










s of poMncJ 












t. 






1993. . . 








2,481 


9 


537 


8 


593 


10 


3,611 


6 


1994. . . 








4,019 


6 


851 


9 


602 


17 


5,472 


5 


1995. . . 








3,374 


8 


661 


18 


392 


18 


4,426 


7 


1996. . . 








3,815 


8 


413 


9 


433 


12 


4,661 


7 


1997. . . 








7,258 


10 


492 


12 


328 


14 


8,078 


9 


Year 


Atlantic mackerel 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf Of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










s of Dound, 


L 








1993. . . 


1,255 


12 


66 


44 














1,326 


12 


1994. . . 


3,675 


16 


85 


52 














3,760 


16 


1995. . . 


1,847 


13 


907 


36 














2,754 


15 


199S. . . 


2,699 


12 


422 


25 


2 


59 








3,123 


11 


1997. . . 


2,636 


14 


1,190 


20 














3,826 


11 


Year 


Black drum 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf Of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










s of pound 












- 






1993 . . . 








2 


42 


428 


13 


1,478 


13 


1,908 


11 


1994. . . 








3 


74 


693 


13 


1,177 


20 


1,873 


13 


1995. . . 








155 


42 


658 


16 


1,307 


9 


2,121 


8 


1996. . . 








99 


67 


568 


13 


1,159 


8 


1,826 


8 


1997. . . 








48 





554 


14 


1,750 


12 


2,351 


9 


Year 


Black sea bass 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est |PSE (%) 






- Thousands of pound. 


. 












1993. . . 


49 


16 


4,776 


22 


560 


16 


509 


16 


5,894 


18 


1994. . . 


37 


53 


2,890 


13 


623 


17 


531 


11 


4,081 


10 


1995. . . 


64 


27 


6,099 


14 


588 


12 


288 


11 


7,040 


12 


1996. . . 


85 


19 


5,812 


15 


654 


13 


249 


11 


6,801 


13 


1997. . . 


67 


36 


4,178 


9 


526 


14 


304 


15 


5,075 


8 



(1) Gulf of Mexico estimates do not include Texas data. 

Note:-Est = estimate. PSE (%) = Proportional standard error. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



45 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1993-1997 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 



Year 


Bluefish 




1 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Total 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 


1993. . . 














9,209 


6 


8,735 


7 


2,348 


7 


349 


22 


20,641 


4 


1994. . . 


7,996 


8 


6,284 


8 


1,261 


6 


451 


21 


15,992 


5 


1995. . . 


5,992 


8 


6,973 


9 


1,209 


9 


600 


26 


14,775 


5 


1995. . . 


6,644 


14 


7,050 


10 


1,040 


8 


354 


14 


15,089 


8 


1997. . . 


4,881 


8 


7,405 


10 


1,958 


8 


250 


17 


14,494 


6 


Year 


Dolphin 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousands of pounds 












- 






1993. . . 


143 


21 


1,783 


40 


5,368 


6 


3,524 


13 


10,818 


9 


1994. . . 








393 


30 


9,619 


8 


2,765 


15 


12,778 


7 


1995. . . 








754 


27 


12,142 


5 


6,896 


9 


19,792 


5 


1996. . . 








522 


49 


7,387 


6 


4,640 


12 


12,549 


6 


1997. . . 








208 


44 


10,380 


7 


11,934 


14 


22,521 


8 


Year 


Gag 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousand? of pounds 


















1993. . . 














544 


22 


2,282 


8 


2,827 


8 


1994. . . 














561 


21 


1,947 


9 


2,507 


9 


1995. . . 














303 


19 


2,628 


8 


2,930 


8 


1996. . . 














278 


21 


1,964 


8 


2,242 


8 


1997. . . 














278 


32 


2,656 


9 


2,934 


9 


Year 


Gray snapper 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- ThPggands of pounds, 










1992. . . 














369 


12 


1,091 


7 


1,460 


6 


1993. . . 














245 


13 


1,124 


8 


1,369 


7 


1994. . . 














281 


10 


1,136 


9 


1,417 


8 


1995. . . 














320 


14 


1,058 


8 


1,378 


7 


1996. . . 














231 


13 


955 


8 


1,187 


7 


1997. . . 














373 


19 


877 


11 


1,249 


10 


Year 


Gray triggerfish 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf Of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE {%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










-.Thousands of pounds 










1993. . . 


1 





106 


25 


177 


17 


1,182 


11 


1,465 


9 


1994. . . 


2 


78 


39 


32 


142 


13 


1,165 


11 


1,348 


10 


1995. . . 








65 


32 


97 


15 


1, 017 


9 


1,179 


8 


1996. . . 


1 


65 


155 


43 


183 


15 


496 


11 


836 


11 


1997. . . 








167 


31 


168 


22 


589 


10 


925 


10 



(1 ) Gulf of Mexico estimates do not include Texas data. 

Note:~Est = estimate. PSE (%) = Proportional standard error. 



46 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1993-1997 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 



Year 


Greater amberjack 




1 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf Of Mexico (1) 


Total 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousands of pounds 


















1993. . . 








254 


23 


578 


21 


3,498 


17 


4,330 


14 


1994. . . 














1,626 


19 


1,562 


16 


3,188 


12 


1995. . . 














623 


21 


811 


15 


1,434 


13 


1996. . . 








6 


57 


970 


14 


994 


10 


1,970 


9 


1997. . . 














495 


21 


1,199 


22 


1,694 


17 


Year 


King mackerel 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousands of pounds 


















1993. . . 








141 


50 


4,285 


7 


4,119 


8 


8,545 


5 


1994. . . 








11 


41 


4,176 


7 


4,634 


8 


8,821 


5 


1995. . . 








15 





5,008 


7 


4,697 


7 


9,719 


5 


1996. . . 








7 


71 


4,314 


6 


5,700 


7 


10,020 


5 


1997. . . 








127 


50 


6,377 


6 


5,416 


8 


11,921 


5 


Year 


Red drum 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf Of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE{%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousands of pounds 


















1993. . . 








46 


11 


1,168 


8 


8,710 


5 


9,924 


5 


1994. . . 








4 





1,439 


9 


7,528 


5 


8,970 


4 


1995. . . 








66 





1,661 


11 


11,939 


4 


13,665 


4 


1996. . . 








2 





1,333 


8 


11,708 


5 


13,043 


4 


1997. . . 








2 





798 


10 


12,011 


5 


12,811 


5 


Year 


Red snapper 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousands of P9yn?l§ 


















1993. . . 














142 


27 


4,136 


7 


4,278 


7 


1994. . . 














201 


36 


3,734 


8 


3,935 


8 


1995. . . 














67 


20 


2,876 


8 


2,943 


8 


1996. . . 














102 


35 


2,617 


8 


2,719 


8 


1997 . . 














88 


44 


4,456 


11 


4,544 


11 


Year 


Sand seatrout 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf Of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousands of pounds 


















1993. . . 




















2,090 


10 


2,090 


10 


1994. . . 




















2,884 


6 


2,884 


6 


1995. . . 




















2,002 


8 


2,002 


8 


1996. . . 




















1, 889 


8 


1,889 


8 


1997. . . 




















1,453 


15 


1,453 


15 


(i) Su 


f of Mexico es 


timates do 


not include i 


exas data 















U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



47 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE {%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1993-1997 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 



Year 


Scup 




1 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf Of Mexico (1) 


Total 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est IPSE (%) 






1993. . . 


2,275 


13 


920 


12 


4 


18 








3,198 


10 


1994. . . 


1,542 


16 


1,076 


16 


10 


57 








2,629 


12 


1995. . . 


1,013 


13 


299 


29 


1 


54 








1,313 


12 


1996. . . 


1,618 


10 


621 


14 














2,239 


8 


1997. . . 


809 


14 


384 


28 


12 


41 








1,205 


13 


Year 


Sheepshead 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousands of oounds 


; 








1993. . . 














1,879 


13 


4,577 


6 


6,456 


6 


1994. . . 














2,902 


10 


2,734 


8 


5,636 


6 


1995. . . 








9 


77 


2,597 


11 


4,901 


6 


7,507 


6 


1996. . . 








5 


58 


1,702 


8 


3,348 


6 


5,055 


5 


1997. . . 








2 





1,060 


11 


3,790 


9 


4,852 


8 


Year 


Southern flounder 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf Of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousands of pounds 


















1993. . . 














693 


8 


655 


9 


1,348 


6 


1994. . . 














1,132 


7 


664 


8 


1,796 


. 5 


1995. . . 














924 


9 


715 


8 


1,639 


6 


1996. . . 








1 





478 


11 


780 


8 


1,258 


7 


1997. . . 








19 


57 


788 


9 


677 


8 


1,483 


6 


Year 


Spanish mackerel 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est IPSE (%) 






1993. . . 


1 





175 


18 


1,262 


7 


1,941 


7 


3,378 


5 


1994. . . 








214 


14 


1,158 


6 


1,762 


6 


3,135 


4 


1995. . . 








145 


29 


672 


8 


1,630 


9 


2,447 


6 


1996. . . 








81 


46 


986 


9 


1,637 


7 


2,704 


6 


1997. . . 








22 


35 


1,415 


8 


2,095 


9 


3,533 


6 


Year 


Spot 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf Of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousands of pounds 


















1993. . . 








1,591 


11 


1,780 


7 


108 


56 


3,479 


7 


1994. . . 








1,956 


6 


2,372 


8 


55 


42 


4,383 


5 


1995. . . 








1,571 


10 


1,536 


7 


50 


42 


3,158 


6 


1996. . . 








832 


12 


1,214 


12 


5 


51 


2,051 


9 


1997. . . 








1,724 


13 


976 


12 


3 


44 


2,703 


9 


(1) Gu 


f of Mexico es 


timates do 


fiot include "f 


exas data 















48 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1993-1997 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 



Year 


Spotted seatrout 




1 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Total 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 


1993. . . 




















214 


22 


1,554 


7 


8,295 


5 


10,064 


4 


1994. . . 








202 


14 


1,633 


6 


9,342 


4 


11,178 


3 


1995. . . 








178 


18 


2,030 


8 


10,361 


5 


12,569 


4 


1996. . . 








78 


22 


803 


8 


9,665 


5 


10,545 


4 


1997. . 








299 


21 


1,079 


8 


9,431 


5 


10,808 


5 


Year 


striped bass 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousands of pounds 


















1993. . . 


1,846 


10 


3,803 


12 


16 


38 


1 





5,666 


9 


1994. . . 


2,284 


10 


4,443 


9 


77 


31 


9 


37 


6,813 


7 


1995. . . 


2,657 


8 


8,365 


9 


237 


15 


5 


17 


11,264 


7 


1996. . . 


3,441 


9 


10,885 


6 


288 


13 


6 


36 


14,619 


5 


1997. . . 


5,132 


7 


10,214 


7 


765 


13 


13 


63 


16,125 


5 


Year 


Summer flounder 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf Of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousands of pounds 


















1993. . . 


552 


11 


7,812 


5 


479 


7 








8,844 


4 


1994. . . 


980 


9 


7,886 


4 


481 


7 








9,347 


4 


1995. . . 


858 


11 


4,394 


5 


251 


23 








5,503 


5 


1996. . . 


1,232 


8 


8, 777 


4 


407 


7 








10,416 


3 


1997. . . 


1,058 


13 


10,442 


5 


381 


9 








11,881 


4 


Year 




Tautog 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousands of pounds 


















1993. . . 


1,673 


10 


4,244 


11 


10 


64 








5,927 


8 


1994. . . 


1, 119 


14 


2,346 


19 


3 











3,468 


13 


1995. . . 


959 


16 


3,641 


10 


3 


33 








4,604 


9 


1996. . . 


918 


13 


2,336 


13 


12 


31 








3,266 


10 


1997. . . 


551 


15 


1,587 


14 


58 


52 








2,196 


11 



(1 ) Gulf of Mexico estimates do not include Texas data. 

Note:~Est = estimate. PSE (%) = Proportional standard error. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



49 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE RECREATIONAL 
ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1993-1997 FOR THE ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTS 



Year 


Vermilion snapper 




1 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Total 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousands of pounds 












- 






1993. . . 














98 


23 


759 


11 


857 


10 


1994. . . 














73 


19 


608 


13 


681 


12 


1995. . . 














44 


21 


564 


11 


608 


10 


199e. . . 














79 


45 


229 


14 


309 


15 


1997. . . 














73 


20 


342 


16 


415 


14 


Year 


Weakfish 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE {%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










-Thousands of pounds 


















1993. . . 


7 


59 


887 


11 


209 


13 








1,102 


9 


1994. . . 








1,471 


11 


324 


11 








1,796 


10 


1995. . . 








1,689 


8 


163 


18 








1,852 


7 


1996. . . 








2,849 


7 


102 


10 








2,951 


7 


1997. . . 


1 





3,424 


8 


261 


12 








3,687 


8 


Year 


Winter flounder 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousands of pounds 


















1993. . . 


559 


12 


1,570 


30 














2,130 


22 


1994. . . 


393 


12 


1,104 


17 














1,497 


13 


1995. . . 


389 


23 


1,161 


13 














1,549 


11 


1996. . . 


328 


12 


1,383 


14 














1,712 


11 


1997. . . 


501 


16 


1,000 


16 














1,501 


12 


Year 


All fishes 


Total 


North Atlantic 


Mid-Atlantic 


South Atlantic 


Gulf of Mexico (1) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est |PSE (%) 










- Thousands of pounds 


















1993. . . 


24,298 


5 


55,082 


4 


37,346 


2 


68,519 


2 


185,244 


2 


1994. . . 


23,915 


6 


45,859 


3 


50,089 


3 


63,572 


2 


183,436 


1 


1995. . . 


19,788 


6 


58,870 


8 


50,444 


2 


73,055 


2 


202,157 


3 


1996. . . 


21,286 


6 


55,744 


3 


43,757 


3 


64,567 


2 


185,354 


2 


1997. . . 


19,319 


5 


60,237 


3 


49,316 


3 


79,314 


3 


208,185 


2 



(1 ) Gulf of Mexico estimates do not include Texas data. 

Note:~Est = estimate. PSE (%) = Proportional standard error. 



50 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (INCLUDING RELEASED ALIVE) AND PSE (%) 
BY MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1993-1997 FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 



Year 


Barred sandbass 


barred surfperch 


Black rockfish 


Blue rockfish 


Bocaccio 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


1993. . 






- - Number in thousands- 






1,542 


4 


678 


9 


949 


6 


1,862 


7 


147 


14 


1994. . 


1,487 


5 


385 


11 


693 


7 


544 


7 


179 


14 


1995. . 


1,514 


6 


672 


10 


631 


6 


440 


7 


24 


18 


1996. . 


1,637 


4 


561 


12 


605 


7 


631 


7 


68 


14 


1997. . 


1,411 


6 


611 


13 


595 


9 


736 


13 


65 


23 


Year 


Brown rockfish 


Cabezon 


California halibut 


Canary Rockfish 


Chilipepper rockfish 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


1993. . 






- - Number in thousands- 






154 


9 


109 


7 


347 


7 


231 


7 


46 


25 


1994. . 


67 


14 


76 


9 


491 


6 


178 


8 


56 


18 


1995. . 


80 


11 


85 


11 


924 


6 


201 


10 


28 


26 


1996. . 


111 


9 


111 


8 


683 


6 


131 


8 


55 


18 


1997. . 


101 


19 


74 


12 


510 


7 


115 


14 


3 


39 


Year 


Copper rockfish 


Corbina 


Gopher rockfish 


Grass rockfish 


Kelp bass 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


1993. . 






- - Number in thousands- 






156 


9 


17 


18 


299 


10 


32 


13 


2,610 


5 


1994. . 


159 


11 


26 


17 


216 


10 


17 


17 


1,848 


4 


1995. . 


77 


10 


57 


17 


92 


12 


15 


18 


1,599 


6 


1996. . 


234 


8 


33 


15 


113 


10 


15 


16 


1,634 


5 


1997. . 


102 


11 


24 


19 


76 


13 


21 


20 


1,723 


7 


Year 


Kelp greenling 


Lingcod 


Pacific barracuda 


Pacific bonito 


Pacific cod 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


1993. . . 






- - Number in thousands- 






209 


8 


381 


5 


1,250 


6 


630 


7 








1994. . . 


101 


9 


262 


6 


1,765 


6 


346 


10 


1 


63 


1995. . . 


95 


9 


243 


6 


1,379 


6 


100 


13 








1996. . . 


226 


8 


356 


6 


566 


6 


140 


11 


12 


45 


1997. . 


176 


10 


282 


7 


849 


7 


202 


9 


2 


30 


Year 


Pacific chub 












mackerel 


Pacific sardine 


Pile perch 


Quilback rockfish 


Redtail surfperch 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


1993. . . 







- - Number in thousands- 






4,651 


4 


329 


17 


33 


19 


34 


34 


69 


17 


1994. . . 


5,313 


4 


368 


42 


31 


13 


9 


14 


90 


17 


1995. . . 


5,146 


5 


73 


38 


29 


25 


5 


24 


91 


14 


1996. . . 


5,931 


4 


288 


22 


159 


22 


58 


13 


112 


22 


1997. . 


5,721 


7 


164 


21 


46 


16 


48 


15 


41 


24 



Note:--Est = estimate. PSE (%) = Proportional standard error. 

1993-1995 Estimates do not Include Washington as the Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey 
was not conducted in Washington in those years. 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



51 



ESTIMATED TOTAL NUMBER OF FISH CAUGHT (INCLUDING RELEASED ALIVE) AND PSE (%) 
BY MARINE RECREATIONAL ANGLERS, BY SPECIES, 1993-1997 FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 



Year 


Sheephead (Gal.) 


Silver su 


rfperch 


Striped bass 


Striped seaperch 


Surf smelt 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 


PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


1993. . 





110 


17 


- Number in thousands — 




-- 


68 


11 


101 


13 


132 


9 


1,632 


26 


1994. . 


87 


11 


46 


19 


115 


12 


73 


13 


1,202 


28 


1995. . 


60 


14 


57 


16 


151 


12 


98 


19 


1,413 


25 


1996. . 


77 


12 


60 


20 


174 


9 


286 


12 


4,807 


25 


1997. . 


47 


19 


115 


21 


169 


11 


113 


19 


1,624 


45 


Year 


White croaker 


White sturgeon 


Yellowtall 


Yellowtail rockfish 


All fishes 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 


PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


1993. . 





22 


16 


- Number in thousands- - - 






2,019 


5 


120 


10 


284 


8 


30,922 


2 


1994. . 


900 


9 


5 


30 


24 


15 


164 


8 


27,169 


2 


1995. . 


1,408 


15 


47 


19 


30 


16 


140 


8 


27,609 


2 


1996. . 


1,958 


7 


22 


15 


64 


10 


83 


10 


34,047 


4 


1997. . 


1,063 


10 


26 


17 


855 


9 


352 


21 


7 


3 



Note:-Est = estimate. PSE (%) = Proportional standard error. 
1993-1995 Estimates do not include Washington state data as the Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey 
was not conducted in Washington In those years. 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (IN LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE 
RECREATIONAL ANGLERS BY SPECIES, 1993-1997 FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 



Year 


Barred sandbass 


barred surfperch 


Black rockfish 


Blue rockfish 


Bocaccio 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 


PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


1993. . 


















1,048 


6 


315 


13 


1,621 


7 


1,310 


7 


271 


14 


1994. . 


1,034 


7 


167 


14 


1,150 


8 


503 


8 


424 


17 


1995. . 


1,468 


8 


354 


12 


1,121 


7 


395 


8 


68 


21 


1996. . 


1,305 


6 


313 


15 


1,178 


7 


607 


8 


219 


16 


1997. . 


790 


12 


231 


15 


1,173 


9 


652 


12 


116 


25 


Year 


Brown rockfish 


Cabezon 


California halibut 


Canary Rockfish 


Chilipepper rockfish 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 


PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


1993. . 


















148 


11 


262 


8 


596 


11 


251 


7 


36 


41 


1994. . 


59 


14 


171 


9 


790 


9 


184 


8 


50 


20 


1995. . 


97 


12 


186 


13 


2,349 


8 


266 


9 


23 


26 


1996. . 


105 


10 


254 


9 


1,159 


9 


174 


9 


71 


20 


1997. . 


109 


20 


195 


13 


875 


10 


178 


14 


3 


31 



1993-1995 Estimates do not include Washington state data as the Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey 
was not conducted in Washington in those years. 



52 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



ESTIMATED WEIGHT (IN LBS.) AND PSE (%) OF FISH HARVESTED BY MARINE 
RECREATIONAL ANGLERS BY SPECIES, 1993-1997 FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 



Year 


Copper rockfish 


Corbina 


Gopher rockfish 


Grass rockfish 


Kelp bass 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE {%) 


1993. . 








Xkrt e^-^nA f\f nr4e- 




















218 


10 


12 


21 


224 


11 


38 


17 


1,434 


6 


1994. . 


203 


12 


14 


26 


174 


11 


22 


16 


1,395 


6 


1995. . 


116 


12 


37 


21 


82 


13 


15 


17 


1,131 


7 


1996. . 


350 


9 


33 


24 


83 


11 


21 


17 


816 


6 


1997. . 


166 


12 


15 


36 


56 


14 


21 


22 


767 


9 


Year 


Kelp greenling 


Lingcod 


Pacific barracuda 


Pacific bonito 


Pacific cod 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE {%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


1993. . 








XKrt, ^-^ Ar^ ^t ^ W,r4t> 




















195 


8 


1,605 


6 


1,688 


9 


707 


9 








1994. . 


95 


9 


906 


8 


2,016 


8 


519 


10 


1 


72 


1995. . 


85 


10 


856 


9 


2,491 


8 


177 


16 








1996. . 


206 


9 


1,127 


7 


1,027 


8 


91 


17 


16 


45 


1997. . 


164 


11 


878 


10 


1,700 


8 


412 


12 


2 





Year 


Pacific chub 












mackerel 


Pacific sardine 


Pile perch 


Quilback rockfish 


Redtail surfperch 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


1993. . 








— . At A 




















1,373 


6 


51 


20 


37 


23 


94 


41 


58 


19 


1994. . 


2,225 


8 


42 


34 


26 


14 


16 


15 


70 


18 


1995. . 


2,163 


8 


4 


69 


20 


23 


8 


20 


62 


15 


1996. . 


1,640 


5 


19 


30 


171 


24 


81 


15 


102 


23 


1997. . 


2,126 


20 


14 


28 


43 


18 


79 


17 


36 


27 


Year 


Sheephead (Gal.) 


Silver surfperch 


Striped bass 


Striped seaperch 


Surf snnelt 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE(%) 


1993. . 








XKrt e.nw.A^ ^f A 




















154 


21 


23 


17 


106 


18 


130 


10 


159 


27 


1994. . 


234 


17 


10 


21 


104 


19 


61 


16 


90 


28 


1995. . 


106 


19 


18 


19 


380 


15 


99 


21 


122 


24 


1996. . 


174 


16 


17 


23 


311 


13 


259 


13 


514 


29 


1997. . 


114 


28 


27 


26 


327 


15 


104 


18 


120 


44 


Year 


White croaker 


White sturgeon 


Yellowtail 


Yellowtail rockfish 


All fishes 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


Est 1 PSE (%) 


1993. . 








Xl-irt e^nw%f4^ nf r-./i /-(*» 




















425 


7 


207 


24 


943 


11 


249 


8 


20,935 


2 


1994. . 


174 


15 


44 


36 


209 


18 


179 


8 


17,924 


2 


1995. . 


410 


21 


764 


21 


308 


17 


198 


9 


24,313 


2 


1996. . 


614 


9 


641 


16 


660 


14 


237 


13 


23,191 


2 


1997. . 


328 


20 


549 


15 


3,234 


10 


451 


21 


26,007 


3 


Note:--Est = 


estimate. PSE (%) = Pro 


portional standard error. 








1993-1995 E 


Estimates do not include W 


ishington state data as the 


Marine Recreational Fishe 


ries Statistics Survey 




wasn 


ot conducted in 


Washingto 


1 in those years 

















U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



53 





























lO [^ 


00 


1.D 


ID 




CO 






CO 


m 


CD 


rH 


CO 




CO 








[- 


[^ VD VD 


00 






(D 


n? 




H 


H 


O) 


iH 


H 




0) 


S? 




CM (N 


ro 


H 


CM 




?s 










H 






?S 














E 


Ill 
















E 


Ill 














E 


III 
















E 


III 










to 




o 


CO 
Q. 
















eg 


CO 

a. 














CM 


CO 

Q. 
















S 


a. 










•a 

•H 

u 






o 


















o 
















O 


















o 














CO 



















CO 
















CO 


















CO 




1 


















00 




^^ 


<ri 










O (T\ 


o 


O 


H 




c 






'd* 


^ 


kD 


en 


00 




(- 






CO 


in CO r- 


ro 


rn 














r- 




H 




m 






vo ro 


1.0 


CM 


in 




CO 


. . 




00 


o 


r~ 


CO 


VD 




m 


^^ 




00 


O 00 CM 


■<* 








in 








1^ 




CO 






a> 














<u 


(0 




H 


a\ 


CO 


CM 


rH 




<u 


in 






m in 00 


00 






o 


III 












^ 




o 


III 














o 


III 




^ 






^ 


« 






Ml 






* 








O 














*"* 




^ 
















u 






rH 






rH 


H 




O 








rH 




MH 


(1) 














m 


o 








' 


in CO 


o 


on 


o 










^ 


^ 


in 


^ 


in 










CM 


(n O ITl 


o 




to 
a, 


ro 
o 
o 




n? 












i-H 


f- 




?ri 




rH 


rH 




H 




<n 


?r=! 
















(0 


Sv 




rH 


rH 


rH 




v--* 
















(1) 


^— ' 














0) 


■^-^ 
















0) 


^-^ 










E 


LU 
CO 














T3 


1 


LU 
CO 












1^ 


1 


LU 
CO 














O) 

m 


'E 


LU 
CO 










4J 




CO 

o 


Q- 














8 


^ 


CL 












CO 

o 


Q. 














O 


CO 

o 


CL 














' 














m 




































r 












Tl 










Oi 


in 


m 


in 


^ 










O lO 


111 


H 






m 






kO 


■* 


<M 


VU 






m 












< 








o 




in 


ro 


in 




(1) 


, ^ 




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CM 


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ro 




0) 


, , 




ro 


t^ 


U) 


O 


CM 




a> 


,^^ 




VD 


■* VD (n 


ro 


u 




o 


















o 






in CM 


111 


(N 


CM 




c> 


(0 




t^ 


r^ 




■Jf 


■a" 




o 


CO 




^ 








n 


Ml 
















O 


LU 














f) 


LU 




.. 


* 


* 


* 


* 




C) 


LU 










•H 
rH 










OJ 


■* 


oi 


m 


ro 


























"' 




^ 










































































^ 




m 


^ 


in 


U3 


ID 






g. 




CT\ CO 


CO 


[^ 


[^ 






^ 




^ 


in 


'I' 


m 


in 






g. 




m 

rH 


o o o 

H H rH 


CTl 






III 


















II.I 
















Ul 


















LU 










F 






(0 


















CO 
















CO 


















a) 














TJ 


Q. 
















c 

CO 


Q. 














T3 

C 
CO 


Q. 
















■o 

c 

CO 


a. 










ro 




CO 




<n 






























T1 
















■o 






n 




c 






"J 


r- 


lO 


o 


1J3 








r 


^ o 














r 


















r 
















en 


cn 


OJ 


en 


m 






^ 


m 


lO rH 


rH 


rH 


Oi 






^ , 


(Tl 


CO 


og 


o 


r- 


o 






, 


<o 


CO 


CO CO VD 














in 


H 


H 


in 








U) 


(fl 


Ol CO 


< > 


m 


<* 






</) 


M 


ro 


r~ 


CI 


VD 


in 






(0 


(0 


CM 


m ro ro 


in 


0) 

o 






Ill 


:: 








^ 








III 


D 




« 




.. 






III 


3 


^ 


«. 


.. 


.. 


.. 






III 


3 














c 






















H 




rH 










in 


1.0 


in 


in 


VO 






















x: 


H 


CM 


H 


H 


c^ 








j: 
















































c 

o5 

E 
r 
Z 


















c 

1 

E 

z 










































( ) 




(0 
0) 

1 

s 

CM 


LU 
CO 
Q. 


H 


ch 


in 




m 

rH 




CO 

1 
8 

CM 


LU 
CO 
CL 


H m 


in 

CM 


ID 

rH 


en 

rH 




10 

1 
o 
o 
eg 


LU 
CO 

CL 


0) 

E 
z 


o 

H 


00 


en 


CO 


r- 




CO 

1 

o 
o 

CM 


LU 
CO 

CL 


0) 

E 

3 
Z 


VD 


in ■^ VD 


[- 




>H 




O 
CO 


— 
















o 

CO 
















CO 


















O 
CO 














































T3 










O 


r~ 


in 


(N 


m 




r 






r~ 00 


ro 


1.0 


ro 




r 






t^ 


ro 


en 


m 


I- 




c 






O 


VD r- ■<3' 


CO 










in 


^ 


CN 


1.0 


r-j 




CO 


1 ^ 




ro [^ 


o\ 


ID 


CM 




(0 


, 




ro 


I" 


r- 


CO 


cn 




CO 


, r 




CM 


o en H 


ro 




01 








(N 


1^ 


m 


CO 




(1) 


<n 




[^ o 


^ 


in 


en 






CO 




■* 


■# 


■* 


CM 


CD 




0) 


(A 




VD 


CM CM [~- 


CM 






C) 


Ill 


















III 








». 


V 




o 


Ml 








> 


^ 


^ 






III 




^ 


...... 


^ 






o 






CM 


iH 


H 








O 






rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


CO 


•^ 






in 


in 


en 


I^ 


r- 




o 






rH 


CM CM rH 


CM 


rH 
(Tl 








in 


en 


in 


in 


0) 






in ct\ 


r~ 


in 


m 






■* 


vo 


i^ 


r- 


> 






'J' 


in cn CM 


>)• 





8 

o 




rr^ 




H 


■H 


iH 


iH 


OI 


(n 


rfi 




rH rH 


rH 


rH 


H 


ro 


(0 


SS 




CM 












(0 


?^ 




rH 


ro rH 


rH 


4-> 
U 




(1) 


'^—^ 














c> 


(U 


^-^ 














0) 
















c 


0) 


"-^ 










1 


111 

CO 














ro 

E 
o 


1 


lU 
CO 












ro 
(1) 


1 


LU 
CO 














n 


E 


Ol 
CO 










r 


CO 


D. 














CO 


a. 












(0 


CO 


CL 














o 


CO 


CL 













ro 


o 

















o 














o 


o 
















Q 


o 
















































< 


c 






m 


m 


■^ 


(Tl 


o 


ro 


c 






CM CO 


rH 


(-> 


CN 


OQ 


c 






tri 


rH 


CM 


in 


CM 




m 






in 


o in o^ 


■* 


11 




(11 






lO 


H 


in 


CO 


ro 


<C 


(J) 


, 




r- 00 


r~ 


O 


O 


(D 


, , 




og 


^ 


vo 


in 


in 




0) 


, . 




VD 


CM rH [^ 


CM 
















iH 




■H 




f/i 




^ rH 


<■> 




^ 




O 


U) 




^ 


rM 


VO 


r~ 


m 






CO 




CM 


CM ro rH 


CM 






O 


LU 
















° 


LU 




CM 


H 


H 


CM 




O 


LU 




■a- 


c^ 


r-i 


r^ 


CM 




O 


LU 










M 


























































^ 




CN 


in 


in 


VO 








S- 




ID ^ 
H rH 


ro 
IN 


ro 

H 


rH 






g. 




C~ 


1J3 


[^ 


o^ 


en 






S'i 




ro 


CO o en 

CM O CM 


rH 








III 


















III 
















m 
























rH 










fO 


















CO 
















CO 


















CO 














■D 

C 


CL 
















■a 

c 

CO 


CL 














c 

CO 


CL 
















c 

CD 


CL 










4J 




























































t 




c 






o 


[^ 


m 


<r\ 


in 










> in 


m 


ro 


[~ 










CM 


CO 


CM 


Ul 


VD 










o 


^ rH CM 










CO 


(Tl 


\o 


CM 


r^ 










en en 


'ji 


CO 


^D 






1 ^ 




en 


o 


m 


o 


CN 






, 




^ 


CM rH 




m 
w 






(/) 






fN 












(0 




o in 


"^ 


ID 


00 






(0 




00 


rM 


VD 


[~ 


VD 






(0 














III 


















III 




.. .. 


•. 










LU 




> 


.. 


* 


* 


% 






LU 




































H H 


H 














CM 


^ 


Ul 


ro 


ro 






































































































































m 




















































w 


^ 














^ 












^ 














^_ 










1 


(D 














CO 












CO 
























' 


0) 














<1> 












0) 














<u 












>- 




ro 


^ 


in 


1.0 


l^ 


>- 




ro <3< 


in 


1.0 


r~ 


>- 




ro 


^ 


m 


VD 


r~ 


>- 




ro 


^f in VD 










IT\ 


o^ 


m 


m 


a\ 






en iTi 


tn 


m 


m 






en 


en 


en 


en 


CTl 






en 


en (Tl <n 


cn 


4J 




















en <7i 


m 


rn 


en 






en 


m 


m 


o^ 


a\ 






o^ 


cn <n cn 


CTl 


() 






H 


H 


rH 


rH 


H 






H H 


H 


r-i 


rH / 






rH 


H 


rH 


rH 


H 






rH 


rH rH H 


H 


S 



54 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



























VD ^o in 


in 










vn 


tc vo vo 


vo 




to 






m 


vo 


m 


tH 


in 






0) 


^ 






H 


iH 




^ 


s? 












0) 


ss 












^ 




CM 


tH 


OJ 


CM 


H 






E 


III 












E 


Ill 












E 


III 












fc 


LU 














01 




o 
o 

CM 


CO 
Q. 












o 
o 

CNJ 


CO 
CL 












CM 


CO 
CL 












C<4 


CO 
CL 














(0 
T) 
H 






O 














o 














O 














O 


















CO 














CO 














CO 














CO 




























Ol 










00 


H U) CM 


CO 




c 






u> 


vo in ro 


in 




c 






C^J 


l/l 


m 


LIl 


C\ 


i< 










■* 


n ^ oi 


U3 




m 


^ 




■•a- 


m CM ^ 


O 




re 


^ , 




en 


in vo u) 






TO 


, ■ 




CM 






ro 








n 


CO 




in 


in in m 


m 




8 


to 

III 




'J* 


U) r~ t^ 


as 




s 


to 

III 




CM 


r- ro f^ 


•* 




s 


to 
LU 










m 


m 


UH 

n 


to 

(1) 

o> 


O 












(1) 


o 














o 






CM 


tH .H tH 


r-j 




o 






tH 










in 










^ 






lO 


v£) u) m 


oo 






U> 


CN ^D C^ 


o 




_ 


tn 


CM 


n 


n 


r~ 


m 
u 


E 


LU 
fO 




i-t 


iH H rH 


■H 


o 
m 


to 

1 


LU 
CO 










Q. 
Q. 
CO 


to 
E 


LU 
CO 




H 


tH tH tH 


tH 


CL 
O 


to 

1 


LU 
CO 




1-1 


H 


tH 


H 


tH 


CO 


Q. 










E 


CO 


CL 










tn 


CO 


CL 










CO 


















2 


o 

c 

(0 


— 










c 


o 

c 


— 










T3 


o 

c 














o 

c: 
re 
















(II 




u) CN in 


m 


in 


^ q. [^ 


•*■ 


in 


m >^ 00 


-* 


00 


[^ 


tH 


U) 


vo 


■a 

3 


V) 






r^ 


in vc cs 


o\ 


(1) 


, 




■<}' 


IJD t~ VD 


ro 




ll> 


, , 




o 


CM CM in 


^ 




o 


, . 










')' 




u 

C 

•H 

In 

0) 




n 










H 




t) 


to 




in 


•* ■* ^ 


^ 






to 




CM 


o) CM n 


^ 






to 












ID 




O 


LU 












O 


LLI 












O 


LU 












U 


LU 




iH 


tH 


tH 








S^ 










S? 


'S' 


H O rf 


■<3' 




^ 


CM 


^ CM m 


n 




s? 


U) 


H 


a\ 


a\ 


H 
























CM 


CM CM CM 


n 












CM m n 


CM 




















•H 






III 














Lil 










































F 






(D 














(0 














CO 














CO 


















T3 


a. 












c 

TO 


CL 












T3 

C 
TO 


CL 












c 

TO 


CL 














ro 




m 


" 


in 
























T 












■c 












O 




c 






a\ 


^ r^ m 


t^ 








r 


H 


^ CM in 


tH 








r 










r 




C 1^ 


CT\ 






























f*l 


in in CM 


^ 






, , 


re 


^ 




U) 






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(T 
































to 


VI 












to 


<r. 












to 


V. 




vo 








c 






III 


3 












III 


3 












LU 


r 












LU 




» 


- 


*. 


* 


- 








n 














n 






























^ 


m 




n 


CM 


(1) 
o 








J3 














^ 














JZ 
































c 














c 














c 














c 










































































E 
z 














(U 

E 

D 


O 


o m o^ 


CM 




to 

E 
o 
o 

CM 




E 

= 
z 


to 


r- CM en 


r~ 




to 

aj 

1 
o 
o 

CM 




S CM 


r- 


o 


CO 


in 






1 
o 
o 

CNJ 


LU 
CO 
Q. 


H 


iH iH .M 


rH 




1 
CM 


LU 
CO 

a. 


■H 


>H iH 


tH 




LU 
CO 


tH 


rH tH tH 


tH 




LU 
CO 
CL 


£ CM 

E 
r: 
Z 




CM 


tN 


m 




u 

0) 

-a 




o 

CO 














o 

CO 


— 












O 
CO 














O 
CO 












































TI 










o 


00 o in 


iH 




r 






rH 


CM \o r- 


r^ 




r 






o 


CM [^ CM 


t^ 




c 








in 


in 


in 


H 


r 












in rH CD 


m 




TO 


^ , 




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t^ H CO 


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TO 


, r 




in 


m m in 


m 




TO 


, f 




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n 


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m 












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o 


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m 





Q. 

a. 

01 

c 


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LU 










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to 

1 


g. 

LU 
CO 




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H CM H 




E 
■n 


to 

1 


m 

CO 










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ra 


to 

1 


g, 

LU 
CO 








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u 







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o 


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(1) 


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o 


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o 


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CO 

o 


CL 
















u 






























UL 
















































m 


r 












r 












(U 


r 


















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n o H 


r- 


1) 








^ 


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m 






^ 




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TO 


























a\ 


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m 




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Ol 


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oo 






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o 








tn r-t r- 


in 


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to 




00 








u 


to 




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in CM ^ 


r- 




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to 




in 


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^ 










n 


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fl 


LU 






•. •. ^ 


^ 




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LU 




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- 


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^ 












M 


iH CM iH 


r-j 
























H 


iH r-i tH 






















CO 


















































cf~ 




in 


U3 00 CO 


r~ 






^ 




^D 


O H Ol 


o 
o 






o>i 




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vl< 






o^ 




tj\ 


> 


a\ 


r~ 


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H 








III 














lU 








iH 






111 














LU 




















(D 














(O 














CO 














CO 


















T3 

C 
(0 


a. 












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C 
TO 


CL 












c 

TO 


CL 












c 
re 


CL 














4J 






















































E 

4J 
CO 

II 




c 






o 


m CM 00 


■H 










U) 


Ov •<J' O) 


o 










in 


u> n ■* 


00 














CM 


CM 










n 


•^ t^ m 


r~ 




_ 


^ 




H 


iH 








^ 




o 


tH O O) 


00 






^_. 




ro 


o 


00 


in 


<r» 






m 






^ <T» (T\ 


U) 






to 














to 




a\ 


cr> 00 in 


yo 






to 




O 


in 


m 


iH 


H 






III 




^ 


V » ^ 








III 














lU 




- 


^ * * 


- 






LU 




-. 


- 


- 


>» 


- 










CN 


CM iH rH 


CN 






















in 


in u) in 


lO 










D 


m 


CM 


CM 


H 














































to 
Da 


(0 










TO 










TO 










TO 
















0) 










<U 










ID 










0) 
















>- 






•^ tn VD 


r- 


> 




n 


ro m lo 


[^ 


>- 




n 


^ in v£) 




> 






•<)' 








(U 




CTl 


cr\ CTl CT\ 


o\ 






cr\ 


<Ti en m 


CTl 






o^ 


(Ti cr\ (T\ 


cr\ 






tT> 


<T\ 


a\ 


<T< 


tn 


4J 






cn 


(T\ cy^ CT^ 


a> 






CTi 


CT^ (T\ <T> 


m 






o\ 


tr^ CT^ (T\ 


a\ 






o^ 


(T\ 


a\ 


a\ 


m 









■H 


tH H rH 


iH 






H 


tH H H 


tH 






tH 


tH tH tH 


tH 






iH 


tH 


tH 


tH 


tH 


2 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



55 



r^ in ch cTi (Ti 



CS (Ti 0^ CN 00 



ro cr\ <Ti r^ ro 
rr in <J\ o [f) 

OJ {N <N (N m 



VD Lfl Lfl \D LD 



OJ LO CO Ln CTi 

oi CO c^ KD <y\ 
CD o H a^ 00 



m 00 CO in 'cf 



VO (N \£> Lfl in 



CN 00 CO O OJ 



o iH ro 00 v^ 

CO 0> t*^ ffi 00 
m CX) Oi (^ 00 



in in vi> in vfl 



o 


Ct\ 


^ 


ro 


ro 


in 


1.0 


00 


CTl 


■^ 


'S' 


m 


o\ 


u> 


CO 


•^ 


m 


m 


(N 


cs 



n Tj* ui VD t^ 
CTl o^ <T\ tr\ o> 

<7» Cr^ CT\ CT\ (Tl 



iTi o^ n r^ c^i 



ch c^ t^ H tn 



CD 


1.0 


CT\ 


CO 


•>}| 


in 


in 


in 


rN 


CTl 


o 


in 


i^ 


1-1 


in 


<j 


CO 


U) 


^ 


m 



U3 


«) 


in 


o\ 


m 


CO 


iH 


CTl 


m 


Oi 


H 


°l 


VD 


H 


<N 



o C7^ ^ m 'JJ 



m fN] m CO o 



■^ r^ m c^ ^ 



VO ^ Vi) »^ i^ 



CO 


H 


a\ 


o 


O) 


o 


m 


in 


n 


CTl 


O) 


(N 


U) 


n 


in 


CM 


OJ 


H 


H 


.H 



00 o cn o o 



n ^ in VD r^ 

O^ oS CTl lT\ CJ^ 
(Ti CTl (J^ CT\ CT^ 




00 00 00 ViJ V£> 



in 


o 


CTl 


in 


m 


CI 


CO 


in 


If) 


H 


w 


in 


00 


m 


IX> 


H 


H 


cs 


t») 


<* 



o\ CO > r~ 1X1 



in 


r~ 


__, 


ro 


■"ji 


[^ 


Ul 


■ai 


fN 




•* 


U) 


H 


n 


1J3 


m 


li) 


r~ 


m 


H 
H 



[^ ^ r~ ID r- 



-^ oj ^ m ^ 



in "a" ii •^ in 



(N 


ID 


in 


00 


^ 


O 


CO 


m 


CO 


■sC 


^ 


■* 


[~- 


m 


n 


in 


U) 


00 


kO 


r- 



^ n ro n ^ 



r-^ 


^ 


1.0 


in 


'J' 


o^ 


00 


1J3 


on 


in 


i^ 


CM 


in 


CO 


CN 



Lfi in t/1 ro 00 



m ^ Lf) u) r- 
(y\ <Ts a\ a\ (j^ 
a\ c\ <j\ <j\ (j\ 



•u 


tn 


01 





HI 


irt 




iH 


X 


in 


■H 


(1) 


14-t 


P. 


H 


CJ 








O 


(I) 


tn 


o 


Tl 


tt 


CM 


:3 



t) 


u 





c 


C) 


T) 


-H 




tn 


= 


0) 


o; 


Wl 


i-i 


4J 


0) 


■H 


m 




.C 


H 


-H 


?t 




H 




4J 




^... 


tn 


m 


to 
u 


w 


o 


9) 




jj 


4J 






(tf 


a) 


C 


s 


u 


m 




o 


111 


rH 


^ 


u 


(0 


to 



56 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 





(0 




< 




o 




o 




u. 




_l 




3 




o 




n 


g. 


z 
< 


UJ 


() 


V) 

a. 


Z 


a 

z 


^ 


< 


h- 




< 


UJ 

> 


UJ 

X 


_J 


H 


< 


q: 


a 


o 


UJ 


u. 


(0 

< 


at 


UJ 


a> 


-1 


T- 


UJ 


co 


oe. 


o> 


o 


a> 


? 


^ 


Q 


ffi 


3 
-1 


Of 

< 


z 


o 




z 


H 


T 


X 


(/> 


CD 


II 


3 
< 


o 


O 

(0 


z 
< 

(0 

UJ 


IL. 




U. 

O 


o 

Ul 

a. 


(k: 


V) 


UJ 


>■ 


CO 


ffl 


? 




-» 


(0 


z 


01 

ill 


_l 


_l 




z 
< 


o 

UJ 


-I 
< 



Ujg 
UJ 

a: 

UJ 

z 
q: 

< 

E 
>- 
OQ 



o in 00 (^ 

^ o ^i> CO 

in ko vo yj 



r^ t^ 'J' CO ro 



U3 Ln m CO 
^o Ln ^ o\ 

rO iH LTi m 






■^ fS tN 
o CO o^ 
m VD (T\ 



^ U1 "Ji O CT> 



CN m U> H 

Ul vc o\ vo 
^ vo 00 rn 



t~ vo t^ in i/i 



en 


1.0 


(N 


en 


H 


■^ 


Oi 


t^ 


vc 


VD 


U) 


m 


iH 


cr> 


00 


r- 


in 


n 


in 


in 



•^ 


m 


rH 


«) 


CN 


CM 


vo 


O 


m 


IN 


r~ 


CT\ 


"J- 


(Tl 


CO 


tj" 


iH 


(N 


(N 


CM 



rn "^ in VD r*- 

<T\ C\ <T\ (T\ a\ 



i> t^ <y\ ^ \o 



in o oj o m 



1^ rr* 00 ^ in 
'Tf '^ (j\ i> <y\ 
ro r^ CO <T^ ro 



r- vo vx> \^ in 



CO 


t^ 


m 


i^ 


<y\ 


ro 


00 


in 


rH 


•r 


t^ 


VO 


in 


(N 


o 



t-i m ^ KD If) 



00 GO Cr\ <T\ (N 



CTl ro H 
IT) 00 tt 
O VD 00 



C^ rO LO CT\ (T\ 
iH OJ rH H OJ 



Ln o in o cn 



m ^ in \D r- 
CT\ oS o^ o^ (T\ 

0> <T\ Cr» <Tl (T\ 



(N OJ ^ O) CN 



o 


00 


00 


00 


■* 


00 


tN 


CT\ 


ro 


CO 


o 


O 


in 


00 


<^ 


t- 


[^ 


r- 


r- 


00 


ro 


n 


t 


m 


m 



CM H m fS fN) 



(N 


o 


(N 


in 


m 


in 


C\ 


kO 


00 


■«< 


m 


vo 


•>3< 


kO 


rH 


r-t 


o 


O 


o 


00 


<T\ 


o 

H 


O 
H 


00 


cr\ 



CN r>) tN CN ro 



CN 


[-- 


kO 


m 


■* 


in 


m 


1.0 


o 


n 


r~ 


iH 


^ 


tN 


m 



r- ^ m rH o 



■^ ro r- in U) 

rH H rH rH rH 



o] fo oi in '^a* 
CO ro m m 00 

ro OJ rH rH r- 



o 


00 


«) 


m 


vo 


tN 


r^ 


o 


m 


o> 


iH 


o 


■H 


r- 


00 



to CN tN r>j H 



n ^ in ko 
o^ <Tt (Ti cr^ 

<Tl (T» (7» CTs 



to to 

- <D 
to Tl 



t) 


t> 


n 


a 


O 


■rt 


■H 




m 


= 


i> 


(U 


to 


r-{ 


jj 


(U 


■H 


trt 




x; 


h 


■H 


;* 


•H 


h 




4J 




, — . 


CO 


to 


to 


w 



a) rH X! 

o to m 

O -H 

= u E 



II 4J >. 
4-1 to rH 

to tU C 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



57 











CM 


t- 


H 


CD 


CD 




0) 






VD 


CM 


H 


CM 


■S" 




CO 






o 


"S" 


H 


r- 


ro 










en o 












S? 




m 


CN 


^ 


■H 


1-1 




^ 




ro 


ro 


ro 


CM 


•^ 




?S 




H 


H 


H 


rH 


rH 




a> 


?? 




H 






rH 






E 


Ill 
















E 


LU 
















E 


ill 
















E 


Ill 
















o 
o 


05 

Q. 
















CM 


CO 
















o 
o 

CM 


CO 
CL 
















8 

CM 


CO 
CL 












■a 

-H 




o 


















O 


















o 


















O 


















CO 


— 
















CO 


— 
















CO 



















CO 



























































r 






t/1 


rH 


CD 


t- 


c- 




c 






ro 


VD 


en 


•"J" 


H 




r 






>J3 


CM 


r~ 


'3' 


•^ 




r 






r- H 


ro 


cn 


00 






(D 


J , 




o 


rv) 


CD 


O 


m 




(0 


^ 




ro 


CM 


m 


'J' 


CO 




(0 


1 , 




■^ 


cn 


rH 


C3 






m 


. 




o ro 


en 


CO 


en 


, 




0) 


V) 




rH 


H 


r^ 


Ul 


CD 






(A 




■H 


H 


rH 




H 




8 


CO 




ei) 


CO 


in 


ro 


r- 




Cl> 














J 




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III 
















III 
















III 




^ 






^ 






o 


Ill 












■^ 




u 


















^ 


















o 






•* 


CM 


ro 


m 


ro 




O 






CM H 


CM 


"^ 


rH 


llH 

n 


OJ 




_ 




iH 


in 


CM 


iH 


in 






^ 




ID 


ro 


«li 


CM 


CD 










CO 


(10 


o 


m 


cr\ 


















CQ 


03 

2 

O 
O 

r 




?i^ 




>H 


H 


H 


H 


CM 


1- 




S^i 




CM 


CO 


rH 


H 


H 






;#i 








H 










n^^ 




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CM 


rH 


H 


u 


0) 


•^-^ 














3 


0) 


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£ 


<D 


















a> 


^-^ 












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CO 

o 


UJ 

a. 














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1 


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CO 

o 


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CO 
Q. 














3 

m 


1 
CO 

o 


LU 
CO 
CL 














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03 
O 


1 

CO 

o 


LU 
CO 
CL 












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CO 


03 


r 
















m 


r 


















r 
































3 


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ffl 


















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ro 




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m 






CD 


CM 


en 


cn 


ro 










en 00 


VO 


r~ 






0) 


, r 




CM 


in 


ro 


rj 


kO 




8 


, r 






10 


t- 


cu 


>* 






. . 




H 


> 


00 


H 


CM 










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H 






u 




o 


(/) 




m 


r- 


n 


in 


r- 




(fl 




1/1 


1.0 


111 


ro 


VO 












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en 






















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m 




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t^ 


kO 


l> 


CD 


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c!^ 




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r~i 


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ro 
















c 

TO 


Q. 


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C 
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c 

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n 








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3 


in 


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cr\ 


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r- 








n 
















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c 


cn 




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r 






vo 


CD 


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r- 


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c 






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r 






ro 


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CO 


en 


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t~- 






m 


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o 


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, 




CD 


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in 




m 


J . 




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in 


in 


in 


cn 




m 






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1 






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ro 


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in 




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cn 


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U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



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U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



59 



X IS. 



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60 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



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^ 


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3 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



61 













O O O 


o 




(A 






CN 


cTi r- o 


CO 




in 






CO 


CO "S" ^ CTl 




(0 






in 


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ro 






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o 

CM 


CO 












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o 

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o 
o 

CN 


CO 
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n 














n 














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ro 















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CO 


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o 


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o 




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m 


ro •<ii CO 


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r 






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o 






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u 












































































































































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rH 


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!_: ™ 



62 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 























(N m in 


UJ 










0000 
















000 









w 


















r^ r^ t-i rH 


(N 




m 












</j 
















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rfi 














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III 










E 


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o 
o 


CO 
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CO 












CM 


CO 












CM 


CO 

a. 














n 












n 










































CO 


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CO 












CO 


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CO 


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(A rs] ro ^ 










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H 










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<£ 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



63 











M H O O 


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64 



U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



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U.S. MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES 



65 



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66 



WORLD FISHERIES 



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WORLD FISHERIES 



67 



U.S. AND WORLD COMMERCIAL FISH CATCHES, 1958-96 





U.S. 


commercial catch 






World commercic 


1 catch 






and exvessel value 














Published 




















by U.S. 












Marine 






Year 


(excludes 
weight of 


Published 
by FAO 


Exvessel 
value 




Fresh- 
water 








Grand 
total 










mollusk 


(1) 








Peruvian 


Other (2) 


Total 






shells) 










anchovy 










-Million metric ton^- 


Billion 






- - -M-i 1 1 -i 


on metric 


. 






-flllll 


tons 7 - - 






Live 


weiaht 


i^gllars. 








;;.j.ve weight; 




1958. . 




2.2 


2.7 


0.4 




4.5 


0.8 


28.0 


28.8 


33.3 


1959. . 




2.3 


2.9 


0.4 




5.1 


2.0 


29.8 


31.8 


36.9 


1960. . 




2.2 


2.8 


0.4 




5.6 


3 .5 


31.1 


34.6 


40.2 


1961. . 




2.4 


2.9 


0.4 




5.7 


5.3 


32.6 


37.9 


43.6 


1962. . 




2.4 


3.0 


0.4 




5.8 


7.1 


31.9 


39.0 


44.8 


1963. . 




2.2 


2.8 


0.4 




5.9 


7.2 


33.5 


40.7 


46.6 


1964. . 




2.1 


2.6 


0.4 




6.2 


9.8 


35.9 


45.7 


51.9 


1965. . 




2.2 


2.7 


0.4 




7.0 


7.7 


38.5 


46.2 


53.2 


1966. . 




1.9 


2.5 


0.5 




7.3 


9.6 


40.4 


50.0 


57.3 


1967. . 




1.8 


2.4 


0.4 




7.2 


10.5 


42.7 


53.2 


60.4 


1968. . 




1.9 


2.5 


0.5 




7.4 


11.3 


45.2 


56.5 


63.9 


1969. . 




1.9 


2.5 


0.5 




7.6 


9.7 


47.1 


56.8 


64.4 


1970. . 




2.2 


2.8 


0.6 




8.4 


13.1 


44.1 


57.2 


65.6 


1971. . 




2.3 


2.9 


0.7 




9.0 


11.2 


45.9 


57.1 


66.1 


1972. . 




2.2 


2.8 


0.7 




5.7 


4.8 


51.5 


56.3 


62.0 


1973. . 




2.2 


2.8 


0.9 




5.8 


1.7 


55.2 


56.9 


62.7 


1974. . 




2.3 


2.8 


0.9 




5.8 


4.0 


56.0 


60.0 


65.8 


1975. . 




2.2 


2.8 


1.0 




6.0 


3.3 


56.4 


59.7 


65.7 


1976. . 




2.4 


3.0 


1.3 




5.7 


4.3 


59.1 


63.4 


69.1 


1977. . 




2.4 


3.0 


1.5 




5.8 


0.8 


61.6 


62.4 


68.2 


1978. . 




2.7 


3.4 


1.9 




5.7 


1.4 


63.1 


64.5 


70.2 


1979. . 




2.8 


3.5 


2.2 




5.9 


1.4 


63.6 


65.0 


70.9 


1980. . 




2.9 


3.6 


2.2 




6.2 


0.8 


65.1 


65.9 


72.1 


1981. . 




2.7 


3.8 


2.4 




6.6 


1.6 


66.4 


68.0 


74.6 


1982. . 




2.9 


4.0 


2.4 




6.8 


1.8 


68.2 


70.0 


76.8 


1983. . 




2.9 


4.3 


2.4 




7.5 


0.1 


69.9 


70.0 


77.5 


1984. . 




2.9 


5.0 


2.3 




8.0 


0.1 


75.8 


75.9 


83.9 


1985. . 




2.8 


4.9 


2.3 




8.7 


1.0 


76.7 


77.7 


86.4 


1986. . 




2.7 


5.2 


2.8 




9.7 


4.9 


78.2 


83.1 


92.8 


1987. . 




3.1 


6.0 


3.1 




10.4 


2.1 


81.9 


84.0 


94.4 


1988. . 




3.3 


5.9 


3.5 




11.1 


3.6 


84.4 


88.0 


99.1 


1989. . 




3.8 


5.8 


3.2 




11.4 


5.4 


83.3 


88.7 


100.1 


1990. . 




4.3 


5.9 


3.5 




12.2 


3.8 


83.0 


86.8 


99.0 


1991. . 




4.3 


5.5 


3.3 




12.3 


4.0 


82.6 


86.6 


98.9 


1992. . 




4.4 


5.6 


3.7 




13.1 


6.2 


82.4 


88.6 


101.7 


1993. . 




4.7 


5.9 


3.5 




14.6 


8.5 


82.1 


90.6 


105.2 


1994. . 




4.7 


5.9 


3.8 




16.2 


12.5 


84.8 


97.3 


113.5 


1995. . 




4.4 


5.6 


3.7 




18.2 


8.6 


90.5 


99.1 


117.3 


1996. . 




4.3 


5.4 


3.5 




19.9 


8.9 


92.2 


101.1 


121.0 



(1) Includes U.S. -flag vessel landings at foreign ports, transfer of catches onto foreign 
vessels within the U.S. EEZ (joint ventures), and the weight of mollusk shells. (2) Includes 
diadromous fishes including salmon and other anadromous fishes and catadromous fishes such 
as eels. 

Note: --There are 2,204.6 pounds in a metric ton. Prior to 1970, the world commercial catch 
of whales and seals is excluded. For the years 1970-1996, data for marine mammals and 
aquatic plants are excluded. 

Source: --Fishery Statistics of the United States; Fisheries of the United States; Food and 
Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) - Yearbook of Fishery Statistics, Rome; 
various volumns . 



68 



WORLD FISHERIES 



WORLD COMMERCIAL CATCH OF FISH, CRUSTACEANS, AND MOLLUSKS, BY COUNTRIES, 
1 992-96 (DOES NOT INCLUDE MARINE MAMMALS AND AQUATIC PLANTS) 



Country 


1992(1) 


1993(1) 


1994(1) 


1995(1) 


1996 






. _ - - - -Thousand metric t 
















Live-weiaht 








16,579 
7,508 
6,502 


19,708 
9,008 
6,035 


23,834 

12,005 

7,839 


28,418 
8,943 
7,591 


31,937 
9,522 
6,911 




Chile 


Japan 


8,502 


8,081 


7,398 


6,787 


6,793 


United States (2) . . . 


5,604 


5,940 


5,926 


5,638 


5,394 




4,233 
5,611 


4,546 
4,461 


4,738 
3,781 


4,906 
4,374 


5,260 
4,729 


Russian Federation. . 




3,439 
3,246 


3,685 
3,385 


3,917 
3,522 


4, 145 
3,756 


4,402 
3,648 


Thailand 


Norway 


2,561 


2,588 


2,551 


2,803 


2,963 




2,696 


2,649 


2,701 


2,688 


2,772 


Philippines 


2,272 


2,226 


2,233 


2,221 


2,133 




1,577 


1,718 


1,560 


1,616 


2,064 


North Korea (3) 


1,780 


1,782 


1,802 


1,850 


1,800 




1,997 


1,657 


1,916 


2,044 


1,723 


Mexico 


1,248 


1,201 


1,267 


1,359 


1,499 


Spain (3 ) 


1,255 


1,220 


1,310 


1,370 


1,289 


Bangladesh 


967 


1,047 


1,091 


1,173 


1,264 


Malaysia 


1,105 


1,155 


1,182 


1,245 


1,240 


Argentina 


705 


932 


950 


1,149 


1,239 




1,314 
1,080 


1,411 
1,100 


1,249 
1,150 


1,288 
1,100 


1,230 

1,000 


Viet Nam (3) 


United Kingdom 


870 


929 


964 


1,004 


978 


Canada 


1,337 


1,183 


1, 076 


933 


971 


Burma 


800 


837 


924 


832 


873 


Brazil (3) 


790 
821 


780 
830 


820 
854 


805 
882 


850 
828 


France 


Ecuador 


361 


328 


345 


612 


794 




548 


623 


752 


846 


640 


Italy 


558 


564 


576 


614 


560 




553 
454 


622 
559 


552 
603 


542 
652 


555 
555 


Turkey 




503 
334 


471 
397 


492 
441 


613 
505 


493 
490 


Venezuela 




427 


376 


336 


354 


477 


Netherlands 


487 


533 


529 


522 


463 


Ukraine 


526 


371 


311 


414 


450 


South Africa 


696 


565 


525 


578 


440 


Senegal 


370 


382 


350 


359 


436 


Iran 


334 


318 


332 


368 


382 


All others 

Total 


9,178 


9,003 


8,754 


9,379 


8,963 


101,728 


105,206 


113,458 


117,278 


121,010 





(1) Revised. 

(2) Includes the weight of clam, oyster, scallop, and other mollusk shells. This weight 

is not included in U.S. landings statistics shown elsewhere. 

(3) Data estimated by FAO. 

Source : --Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) 



WORLD FISHERIES 



69 



WORLD COMMERCIAL CATCH OF FISH, CRUSTACEANS, AND MOLLUSKS, BY CONTINENT, 
1992-96 (DOES NOT INCLUDE MARINE MAMMALS AND AQUATIC PLANTS) 



Continent 


1992 (1) 


1993(1) 1 1994(1) 


1995(1) 


1996 






. . _ - - -Thousand metric t 
J^iv?- weight. 














North America 


8,756 


8,871 


8,835 


8,528 


8,423 


South America 


16,574 


17,832 


22,745 


20,018 


20,216 




12, 739 


12,598 


12 , 835 


13 , 598 




Former USSR 


6,846 


5,411 


4,529 


5,216 


5, 570 


Asia 


50,468 


54,258 


58,300 


63,189 


67, 034 


Africa 


5,294 


5,200 


5,181 


5, 585 


5, 271 


Oceania 


917 


888 


894 


1,028 


880 


Other 

Total 


134 


148 


139 


116 


157 


101,728 


105,206 


113,458 


117,278 


121,010 









(1) Revised. 

Source: --Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAG) 



WORLD COMMERCIAL 
AREAS, 1992-96 



CATCH OF FISH, CRUSTACEANS, AND MOLLUSKS, BY MAJOR FISHING 
(DOES NOT INCLUDE MARINE MAMMALS AND AQUATIC PLANTS) 



(1) Revised. 



Area 


1992(1) 1 1993(1) 1 1994(1) | 1995(1) | 1996 


Marine Areas : 

Pacific Ocean 

Atlantic Ocean 




54,378 

24,343 

7,363 


56,393 

23,690 

7,869 


Live-weiaht 

63,057 

23,648 

7,737 


63,201 

24,827 

8,010 


64,903 

24,706 

8,242 


Total 


86,084 


87,952 


94,442 


96,038 


57,851 


Inland waters: 


584 

357 

504 

667 

11,668 

1,839 

25 


579 

375 

497 

544 

13,372 

1,864 

23 


573 

403 

509 

460 

15,245 

1,805 

21 


540 

425 

527 

416 

17,335 

1,974 

23 


561 

402 

513 

416 

19,326 

1,919 

22 








Asia 




Oceania 


Total 

Grand total 


15,644 


17,254 


19,016 


21,240 


23,159 


101,728 


105,206 


113,458 


117,278 


121,010 



Source: --Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) 



70 



WORLD FISHERIES 



WORLD COMMERCIAL CATCH OF FISH, CRUSTACEANS, AND MOLLUSKS, BY SPECIES 
GROUPS, 1992-96, (DOES NOT INCLUDE MARINE MAMMALS AND AQUATIC PLANTS) 



1992(1) I 1993(1) I 1994(1) | 1996(1) | 



Species group 



-Thousand metric tong - 



Carps, barbels, cyprinids 

Cods, hakes, haddocks 

Flatfish 

Herrings, sardines, anchovies... 

Jacks, mullets, sauries 

Mackerel, snoeks, cutlassf ishes . 

Redfish, basses, congers 

River eels 

Salmons, trouts, smelts 

Shads 

Sharks, rays, chimaeras 

Sturgeons, paddlefish 

Tilapias 

Tunas, bonitos, billf ishes 

Other fishes 

Crabs 

Krill 

Lobsters 

Shrimp 

Other crustaceans 

Abalones, winkles, conchs 

Clams, cockles, arkshells 

Mussels 

Oysters 

Scallops 

Squids, cuttlefishes, octopus.., 

Other mollusks 

Sea urchins, other echinoderms . . 
Miscellaneous 



7,081 
10,435 

1, 170 
21, 196 
10, 541 

3,452 

6, 060 

209 

1,467 

694 

728 

14 

1,064 

4, 512 

16,409 

1,062 

305 

214 

2, 970 
909 

85 
2, 125 
1,394 
1,711 

1, 056 

2, 737 
1, 511 

102 
515 



Total. 



102,728 



8,185 

9, 915 

1, 105 

21, 895 

10, 129 

4, 008 

5,819 

203 

1, 700 

656 

741 

9 

1,084 

4,556 



, 068 
89 
211 
, 924 
, 159 
94 
,473 
,368 
, 032 
,459 
, 715 
,833 
105 
320 



105,206 



,Live weight 

9,530 

9,641 

992 

25, 836 

10,061 

4, 514 

6,445 

206 

1, 803 

634 

752 



129 
623 



17,490 

1,259 

84 

222 

128 
299 
100 
635 
321 
821 
634 
773 
012 
117 
389 



113,458 



10,970 

10,606 

925 

21, 975 

11, 050 

4,688 

7,031 

202 

2,089 

685 

757 

7 

1,251 

4,708 

18,277 

1,267 

119 

228 

217 

515 

99 

729 

416 

248 

653 

861 

075 

127 

503 



117,278 



(1) Revised. 
Source :- -Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) 



DISPOSITION OF WORLD COMMERCIAL CATCH, 1992-96 
(DOES NOT INCLUDE MARINE MAMMALS AND AQUATIC PLANTS) 



1992 (1) 



1993 (1) 



1994 (1) 



1995 (1) 



Marketed fresh 

Frozen 

Canned 

Cured 

Reduced to meal and oil (2) 
Miscellaneous purposes 

Total 



25.7 
24.3 
12.3 
10.0 
26.0 
1.7 



25.3 
24.8 

12.2 
9.8 

26.1 
1.8 



-Percent of Total - 

25.8 
23 .6 
11.1 

9.8 
27.9 

1.8 



29 


5 


23 


3 


10 


9 


10 





24 


7 


1 


6 



(1) Revised. 

(2) Only whole fish destined for the manufacture of oils and meals are included. Raw material 
for reduction derived from fish primarily destined for marketing fresh, frozen, canned, cured, 
and miscellaneous purposes is excluded; such waste quantities are included under the other 
disposition channels. 



Source :- -Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) 



WORLD FISHERIES 



71 



WORLD IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF SEVEN FISHERY COMMODITY GROUPS, 
BY LEADING COUNTRIES, 1992-96 



Country 


1992 (1) 1 1993 (1) 1 1994 (1) | 1995 (1) | 1996 


IMPORTS: 


__.----_--- -Thousand U.S. dollars- ---------- 




12,831,760 

6,024,064 

2,934,588 

2,898,232 

2,643,440 

2,190,892 

1,906,861 

1,398,181 

1,197,370 

680,844 

686,876 

888,606 

498, 036 

828,086 

942,090 

734,928 

543,769 

491,029 

467,773 

4,467,246 


14,187,149 

6,290,233 

2,556,151 

2,629,799 

2,131,181 

1,884,301 

1,628,852 

1,376,856 

1,094,253 

575,929 

821,404 

791,608 

537,346 

730,459 

830,480 

627,713 

566,502 

544,243 

371,756 

4,390,343 


16,140,465 

7,043,431 

2,796,719 

2,638,737 

2,257,462 

2,316,449 

1,880,350 

1,647,106 

1,415,239 

855,706 

913,404 

1,017,635 

718,451 

920,918 

815,616 

669,888 

619,595 

560,799 

448,661 

5,394,255 


17,853,481 

7,141,428 

3,221,298 

3,105,684 

2,281,316 

2,478,817 

1,910,091 

1, 831,511 

1,573,732 

941,293 

1,034,070 

1,191,857 

824,817 

1,035,818 

825,606 

763,245 

659,681 

589,723 

546,076 

6,235,750 


17, 023,945 

7,080,411 

3,194,133 

3,134,893 

2,590,985 

254,957 

2,065,025 

1,928,143 

1,618,669 

1,184,170 

1,158,864 

1,141,647 

1,057,402 

966,333 

818,353 

782,858 

641,782 

612,945 

587,169 

9, 021,415 


United States 




Italy 




United Kingdom 
























Other Countries 

Total 


45,254,671 


44,566,558 


51,070,886 


56,045,294 


56,864,099 


EXPORTS : 


3,071,780 

2,436,832 

3,582,545 

1,559,977 

2,319,917 

1,802,097 

2,085,495 

1,252,364 

826,299 

1,178,552 

1,359,050 

1,405,567 

712,729 

1,252,713 

1,146,138 

517,119 

692,954 

955,379 

673,369 

11,383,320 


3,404,268 

2,302,346 

3,179,474 

1,542,429 

2,150,665 

2,369,422 

2,055,438 

1,124,679 

1,471,446 

1,419,492 

1,335,238 

1,296,340 

813,750 

1,137,638 

1,036,674 

685,004 

652,956 

857,752 

835,980 

11,728,959 


4,190,036 
2,735,485 
3,229,585 
2,320,125 
2,359,034 
2,213,259 
2,182,078 
1,303,974 
1,720,459 
1,583,416 
1,411,052 
1,435,824 
1,021,015 
1,264,615 
1,180,158 
979,502 
790,357 
909,734 
1,125,440 
13,659,341 


4,449,457 
3,122,662 
3,383,589 
2,835,021 
2,459,629 
2,328,105 
2,314,413 
1,704,260 
1,635,145 
1,666,752 
1,564,878 
1,447,239 
1,190,676 
1,342,552 
1,195,477 
869,727 
899,248 
993,364 
1,104,641 
15,597,714 


4,117, 865 
3,415,696 
3,147,858 
2,856,986 
2,698,976 
2,362,200 
2,291,261 
1,697,258 
1,686,162 
1,678,222 
1,512,992 
1,470,046 
1,461,486 
1,425,837 
1,307,859 
1,120,391 
1,055,756 
1,003,460 
978,352 
15,683,255 














Chile 


Russian Federation. . 










United Kingdom 

Peru 




France 


India 


Other Countries 


40,214,1$6 


41,399,950 


47,614,489 


52,104,549 


52,971,918 





(1) Revised. Note: --Data on imports and exports cover the international trade of 176 countries or areas. The 
total value of imports, probably because charges for insurance, freight, and similar expenses were included in 
the import value but not in the export value. The seven fishery commodity groups covered by this table are: 
l.Fish, fresh, chilled or frozen; 2. Fish, dried, salted, or smoked; 3 .Crustaceans and mollusks, fresh, dried 
salted, etc.; 4. Fish products and preparations, whether or not in airtight containers; 5. Crustacean and 
mollusk products and preparations, whether or not in airtight containers; 6. Oils and fats, crude or refined 
of aquatic animal origin; and 7. Meals, solubles and similar animal foodstuffs of aquatic animal origin. 
Source: --Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) 



72 



PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 



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PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 



73 



VALUE OF PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1996 AND 1997 
(Processed from domestic catch and imported products) 



(1) Preliminary. May not add due to rounding. 
Note: --Value is based on selling price at the plant. 




Item 


1996 


1997 


(1) 


Edible: 


dpll^rg 

5,767,519 

1,428,937 

196,441 


of total 

72 

18 

2 


ThQVSfina 
dollars 

4,743,917 

1,361,437 

142,843 


Percent 
of total 

69 

20 

2 


Canned 

Cured 

Total edible 

Industrial : 

Bait and animal food (canned) 


7,392,897 


92 


6,248,197 


92 


370,945 

187,968 

85,583 


5 
2 

1 


231,756 
238,760 
108,590 


3 
3 
2 


Other 

Total industrial 

Grand total 


544,496 


8 


579,106 


8:;i 


8,037,393 


100 


6,827,303 


100 ;; 



FISH STICKS, FISH PORTIONS, AND BREADED SHRIMP 
U.S. PRODUCTION OF FISH STICKS, FISH PORTIONS, AND BREADED SHRIMP, 1988-97 



Fish sticks 



Fish portions 



Breaded shrimp 



1988. 
1989. 
1990. 
1991. 
1992. 
1993. 
1994, 
1995. 
199S, 
1997 



Thousand 
pounds 

80,148 
89,112 
65,209 
63,286 
58,295 
67,959 
58,789 
74,066 
65,244 
69,149 



Thousand 
dollars 

113, 868 
116,440 
74,866 
77,877 
56,020 
67,975 
51,429 
73,478 
55,802 
64,281 



Thousand 
pounds 

301,450 
279,864 
242,776 
204,697 
194,307 
206,165 
196,289 
251,217 
213,962 
195,554 



Thousand 
JQXl^rg 

439,701 
400,351 
352,589 
313,400 
296,214 
313,195 
268,353 
356,518 
306,501 
285,348 



Thousand 
pounds 

99,471 
120,927 
110,760 
116,335 
122,266 
111,489 
113,461 
100,522 
108,486 
116,961 



Thousand 
dollars 

292,899 
404,535 
353,265 
335,880 
350,497 
316,722 
304,931 
299,355 
341,770 
333,294 



74 



PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 



FISH FILLETS AND STEAKS 



PRODUCTION OF FRESH AND FROZEN FILLETS AND STEAKS, BY SPECIES, 1996 AND 1997 



Species 



1996 


(1) 


1997 1 


Thwsand 


Thpussna 


Thousand 


Tli<?vs?n<? 


i>QvMs. 


dollars. 


,P9\An<S5 


<S<?ll?fa 


313 


1,059 


480 


1,894 


6,993 


15,426 


7, 042 


17,660 


108 


246 


132 


282 


67,203 


158,413 


78,793 


178,517 


222 


717 


117 


350 


2,812 


11,903 


4,305 


17,090 


76 


302 


62 


264 


29,178 


79,541 


25,507 


75,462 


2,276 


12,687 


2,789 


17,202 


3,682 


13,853 


6,772 


24,058 


33,960 


36,587 


18,783 


16,878 


3,746 


20,561 


4,295 


20,731 


972 


2,247 


710 


1,661 


564 


1, 900 


522 


1,634 


258 


706 


557 


1,741 


1,737 


4,297 


1,418 


2,786 


8 


12 


1 


2 


1,970 


5,004 


1,071 


2,336 


136,374 


157,814 


112,027 


128,594 


20,218 


41,913 


14,876 


30,008 


1,600 


3,603 


1,206 


2,741 


18,612 


65,719 


18,653 


68,281 


717 


4,248 


704 


4,138 


276 


1,136 


209 


890 


2,394 


5,992 


1,854 


5,432 


1,875 


11,515 


2,223 


11,364 


121 


223 


102 


204 


6,081 


34,196 


8,985 


49,706 


353 


946 


1,179 


3,457 


9,297 


59,881 


10,187 


64,169 


244 


1,196 


220 


1,021 


1,335 


3,755 


965 


2, 889 


66 


209 


58 


174 


16,744 


48,826 


18,995 


61,241 


372,385 


80e,633 


345,799 


814,857 


274 


1,084 


272 


1,077 


6,282 


27,207 


5,849 


23,332 


7 


22 


5 


12 


3,380 


9,900 


1,584 


3,313 


12 


27 


100 


212 


2,933 


12,725 


3,187 


14,408 


4,706 


14,669 


5,459 


15,787 


33,330 


31,753 


35,270 


35,894 


50,924 


57,387 


51,726 


94,035 


423,309 


904,020 


397,525 


908,892 



Fillets: 

Amber jack 

Anglerf ish 

Bluef ish 

Cod 

Cusk 

Dolphin 

Drum 

Flounders 

Groupers 

Haddock 

Hake 

Halibut 

Lingcod 

Marlin 

Ocean perch: 

Atlantic 

Pacific 

Ocean pout 

Pollock: 

Atlantic 

Alaska 

Rockf ishes 

Sablefish 

Salmon 

Sea bass 

Sea trout 

Shark 

Snapper 

Spanish mackerel . 

Swordf ish 

Tilapia 

Tuna 

Wahoo 

Whitef ish 

Wolffish 

Unclassified 

Total 



Steaks : 

Dolphin 

Halibut 

King mackerel . 

Salmon 

Shark 

Swordf ish 

Tuna 

Unclassified. . 

Total 

Grand total . . 



(1) Revised. 
Note: Some fillet production was 



further processed into frozen blocks. 



PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 
CANNED FISHERY PRODUCTS 



75 



PRODUCTION OF CANNED FISHERY PRODUCTS, BY SPECIES, 1996 AND 1997 









1996 






1997 




Species 


Pounds 
per 














Standard 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Standard 


Thousand 


Thousand 




case 


cases 


pound 


dollars 


cases 


pound 


dollars 


For human consumption: 
















Fish: 
















Herring 


23.4 


2Se,325 


6,232 


10,826 


250,855 


5, 870 


11,172 


Salmon: 
















Chinook 


44.25 


2,599 


115 


628 


678 


30 


174 


Chum 


44.25 


337,627 


14,940 


19,572 


175,864 


7,782 


7,039 


Pink 


44.25 


2,947,797 


130,440 


158, 969 


2,604,678 


115,257 


140,999 


Coho 


44.25 


61,876 


2,738 


5,594 


59,367 


2,627 


6,809 


Sockeye 

Total salmon 

Specialties 


44.25 
48 


1,105,763 


48,930 


99,582 


690,169 


30,540 


97,790 


4,455,661 


197,163 


284,345 


3,530,757 


162,106 


252,811 


10,521 


505 


4,272 


8,750 


420 


4,105 


Sardines, Maine 


23.4 


755,214 


17,672 


29,857 


682,735 


15,976 


29,027 


Tuna: (2) 
















Albacore : 
















Solid 


18 


7,798,889 


140,380 


310,999 


8,647,722 


155,659 


336,415 


Chunk 

Total 


18 


1,403,000 


25,254 


51,691 


1,646,333 


29,634 


58,177 


5,201,88? 


165,634 


362,690 


10,294,056 


185,293 


394,592 


Lightmeat : 














Solid 


18 


331,722 


5,971 


8,938 


408,833 


7,359 


11,233 


Chunk 

Total 

Total tuna 

Specialties 


18 
48 


28,011,722 


504,211 


585,296 


24,132,222 


434,380 


512,905 


28,343,444 


510,182 


554,234 


24,541,056 


441,735 


524,138 


37,545,333 


675,816 


956,924 


34,835,111 


627,032 


918,730 


146 


1 


80 


438 


21 


210 


Other 

Total fisb 

Shellfish: 


48 


324,063 


15,555 


12,169 


373,896 


17,947 


18,694 


43,357,262 


912,950 


1,258,473 


39,682,541 


817,632 


1,234,745 














Clam and clam 
















products: (3) 
















Whole and minced. 


15 


3,057,133 


45,857 


61,987 


2,911,800 


43,677 


62,698 


Chowder and juice 


30 


2,384,600 


71, 538 


46, 148 


2,330,433 


69,913 


43,175 


Specialties 


48 


249,042 


11,954 


9,100 


235,125 


11,286 


8,703 


Crabs, natural 


20 


4,769 


93 


380 


4,256 


83 


446 


Lobster meat and 
















specialties 


48 


7, 104 


341 


384 


7,417 


356 


439 


Oyster, specialties 


48 


167 


8 


131 


604 


29 


111 


Shrimp, Natural (4) . . 


6.75 


121,333 


819 


6,074 


173,037 


1,168 


4,557 


Other 

Total shell fiBb 

Total for human 


48 


194,771 


9,349 


6,260 


179,396 


8,611 


6,559 


6,018,919 


139,959 


130,464 


5,842,068 


135,123 


126,688 


















49,376,181 


1,052,909 


1,428,937 


45,524,610 


952,755 


1,361,437 


For bait .and animal 














food 

Grand total 


48 


17,168,625 


824,094 


370,945 


12,756,667 


612,320 


231,756 


66,544,806 


1,877,003 


1,799,882 


58,281,276 


1,565,075 


1,593,193: i 



(1) 

(2) 
(3) 

(4) 



Revised. 

Flakes included with chunk. 

"Cut out" or "drained" weight of can 

contents for other clam products. 
Drained weight . 



contents are given for whole or minced clams, and net 



76 



PROCESSED FISHERY PRODUCTS 



INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS 



PRODUCTION OF MEAL, OIL, AND SOLUBLES, 1996 AND 1997 



Product 


1996 


1997 1 




Thousand 


Thousand 


Thw5?n4 


Thousand 




pounds 


a<?ll?rs 


Dounds 


dollars 


Dried scrap and meal : 










Fish: 










Menhaden 


418,898 


87,064 


478,496 


115,690 


Tuna and mackerel 


56,770 


8,394 


56,108 


9,208 


Unclassified 

Total 


149,808 


41,290 


171,940 


47,775 


625,476 


136,748 


706,544 


172,673 


Shellfish 

Total, scrap and meal 
Solubles, total 

Body oil : 


17,648 


1,207 


18, 124 


1,263 


643,124 


137,955 


724,668 


173,936 


81,994 


6,068 


144,002 


9,537 










Menhaden 


246,536 


43,713 


278,042 


53,673 


Unclassified 

Total, oil 


1,863 


232 


5,337 


1,614 


24B,399 


43,945 


283,379 


55,287 



(1) Revised. 



Note: --To convert pounds of oil to gallons divide by 7.75. 
production in American Samoa and Puerto Rico. 



The above data includes 



PRODUCTION OF INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS, 1988-97 



Year 


Quantity 


Value 1 






Marine 


Meal, 


Other 






Meal 


Solubles 


animal 


solubles. 


industrial 


Grand 








oil 


and oil 


products 


total 




T 


tiousand pounds 




T 


thousand dollar 








1988 


643,796 


223,449 


224,733 


188,843 


46,737 


235,580 


1989 


618,382 


232,709 


225,478 


156,321 


49,756 


206,077 


1990 


577,498 


185,660 


281,949 


163,796 


42,759 


206,555 


1991 


612,716 


169,607 


267,345 


170,495 


37,707 


208,202 


1992 


644,512 


93,007 


184,725 


157,693 


45,310 


203,003 


1993 


750,744 


126,903 


293,452 


182,170 


43,689 


225,859 


1994 


807,833 


146,568 


291,882 


186,222 


61,992 


248,214 


1995 


667,240 


89,513 


241,941 


172,279 


74,264 


246,543 


1996 


643,124 


81,994 


248,399 


187,968 


85,583 


273,551 


1997 


724,668 


144,002 


283,379 


238,760 


108,590 


347,350 



Note: --Does not include the value of imported items that may be further processed. 



U.S. COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS 



77 




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78 



U.S. COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS 

FROZEN FISHERY PRODUCTS 

U.S. COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1997 



Species 


January 


February 


March 


April 


May 


June 


Elsh 


^V,„,,„,„^ „„,,„/!„ 1 






«Z i ■ ^ ■ 


1 r^ . ȣ 






Saltwater: 














Blocks and slabs: 














Cod 


3,869 


1,997 


1,545 


3,359 


5,101 


6,323 


Flounder and sole 


940 


803 


772 


747 


1,081 


1,042 




1,094 
174 


653 
111 


624 

96 


2,592 
1,027 


2,704 
40 


2,265 

65 


Ocean perch 


Pollock: 














Alaska (walleye) .... 


21,380 


17,656 


20,493 


18,697 


19,946 


24,623 


Atlantic or other. . . . 


9,515 


8,643 


10,082 


9,712 


9,650 


11,167 


Whiting: 














Silver (Atl) hake. . . . 


578 


819 


613 


1,026 


1,130 


1,230 


Pacific hake 


356 


172 


478 


298 


248 


244 


Minced 


10,237 


9,270 


9,164 


8,430 


10,103 


10,749 


Unclassified (3) 

Total, blocks and olaiss 

Fillets and steaks: 


2,816 


1,266 


1,440 


1,337 


1,212 


1,220 


50,355 


41,350 


45,307 


47,225 


51,215 


58,928 














Cod 


13,710 


14,753 


17,963 


23,938 


27,648 


26,640 


Flounder and sole 


3,701 


3,916 


2,249 


4,653 


3,935 


3,408 


Haddock 


3,162 


2,775 


2,633 


3,343 


3,118 


4,019 


Halibut 


3 74 


359 


352 


352 


431 


772 


Ocean perch 


4,374 


3,185 


2,259 


2,185 


1,713 


1,360 


Pollock: 














Alaska (walleye) .... 


6,117 


11,491 


14,935 


12,878 


11,953 


10,321 


Atlantic or other. . . . 


5,406 


4,327 


4,251 


4,743 


4,097 


4,868 


Rockfish 


395 


356 


305 


138 


162 


323 




2,691 


2,492 


2,087 


2,218 


2,172 


2,008 


Whiting: 


Silver (Atl) hake. . . . 


3,890 


3,717 


3,768 


2,059 


2,628 


4,113 


Pacific hake 


1,308 


1,106 


826 


668 


544 


899 


Unclassified 

Total, fillets and ateaks 
Round, dressed, etc.: 


19,323 


17,917 


19,510 


20,104 


21,053 


19,108 


64,451 


66,394 


71,138 


77,275 


75,454 


77,835 














Halibut (exc. California) . 


4,194 


3,746 


3,030 


2,874 


4,712 


8,243 


Sablefish 

Salmon: 


134 


98 


124 


292 


568 


678 














Chinook or king 


1,866 


1,565 


1,444 


1,042 


1,111 


1,182 


Silver or coho 


3,559 


2,590 


1,705 


1,200 


764 


562 


Chum or fall 


14,345 


10,180 


6,190 


3,406 


1,577 


1,158 


Pink 


1,944 
4,499 


1,259 
4,872 


1,317 
3,830 


1,020 
2,109 


211 
1,461 


219 
1,632 


Sockeye 


Unclassified 

Whiting: 


2,154 


1,731 


1,880 


1,886 


1,459 


2,633 


28,367 


22,157 


16,366 


10,663 


6,583 


7,386 














Silver (Atl) hake .... 


246 


175 


195 


98 


62 


109 


Pacific hake 


340 


100 


348 


525 


601 


699 


Unclassified (exc bait) . . 
Total, round, dressed, etc. 


47,148 


35,254 


40,108 


40,484 


32,075 


26,688 


80,429 


51,570 


60,171 


54,535 


44,601 


43,803 



See footnotes at end of table. 



(Continued on next page) 



U.S. COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS 



79 



FROZEN FISHERY PRODUCTS 



U.S. COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1997 - Continued 




Species 


January 


February 


March 


April 


May 


June 


Slsh 
Fish sticks and portions (2) : 

Analog products 

Surimi: Pollock 

Other 

Total, saltwater 

Freshwater : 

Fillets and steaks 

Catfish 


23,087 


19,810 


Thousand pounds 






24,391 


25,435 


18,960 


21,968 


4,824 

12,197 

4 


3,925 

15,347 

353 


3,G33 

18,194 

597 


4,108 

16,786 

24 


3,680 

12,557 

35 


4,089 

12,782 

70 


235,951 


208,789 


218,000 


222,326 


215,933 


222,946 


137 

12,711 

939 

894 


95 

12,076 

941 

302 


68 

11,398 

1,037 

385 


72 

11,477 

1,122 

352 


60 

10,534 

1,005 

271 


643 

10,143 

1,174 

123 


Unclassified (exc bait) .... 
Total, freshwater .... 
Bait & animal food 

Shellfish 

Clams and clam meats 

Crabs : 


14,681 


13,414 


12,888 


13,023 


11,870 


12,083 


12,864 


13,132 


10,709 


14,223 


14,143 


13,945 


2,028 


5,871 


5,823 


7, in 


8,058 


8,109 


1,494 

27 
5,036 

582 
2,195 
1,710 


1,980 

20 
4,813 

796 
4,929 
1,500 


597 

22 

5,747 

675 

17,244 

4,931 


623 

15 
5,583 

763 

20,290 

5,606 


517 

14 
4,332 

592 

17,646 

4,893 


584 

26 
4,856 

701 

13,375 

3,404 


King: 

Meat 


Snow: 




Unclassified 

Lobsters : 

Spiny (tails) 

Unclassified (whole & meat) . 


11,044 


14,038 


29,216 


32,880 


27,554 


22,946 


2,992 

1,363 

799 

2,023 

10,765 

5,658 

14,895 

12,129 


2,352 

1,160 

578 

2,601 

12,218 
4,725 
9,683 
8,940 


1,824 

1,137 

908 

2,844 

11,486 
4,039 
7,893 
8,098 


1,503 

924 

1,218 

2,881 

10,553 
5,987 
8,864 
8,127 


1,111 

746 

1,259 

2,885 

8,103 
5,998 
9,103 
7,650 


1,525 

587 

1,288 

3,097 

6,828 
4,647 
6,320 
7,640 




Shrimp : 

Raw, headless 


Peeled 


Unclassified 


Total, shrimp 


43,447 


35,566 


31,516 


33,531 


30,854 


25,435 


12,780 

3,035 

73,511 


17,026 

3,181 

82,373 


19,036 

3,004 

95,308 


13,403 

2,977 

96,734 


10,019 

2,798 

85,724 


7,691 

2,918 

73,55ff 


Unclassified shellfish 

Total, shellfish 

Total, fish and shellfish 
Cured fish (all categories) . . . 

Grand total 


343,007 


317,708 


336,905 


346,306 


327,670 


322,570 


801 


700 


1,152 


1,339 


770 


514 


343,808 


318,408 


338,057 


347,645 


328,440 


323,084 



See footnotes at end of table. 



(Continued on next page) 



80 



U.S. COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS 

FROZEN FISHERY PRODUCTS 

U.S. COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1997 - Continued 



Species 


July 


August 


September 


October 


November 


December 


Fish 






Thousand pounds - 










Saltwater: 














Blocks and slabs: 














Cod 


4,395 


6,477 


6,676 


7,544 


8,756 


8,632 


Flounder and sole 


669 


1,487 


2,344 


2,260 


2,265 


1,905 


Haddock 


2,063 


1,418 


1,074 


1,604 


1,395 


2,083 


Ocean perch 


59 


141 


51 


124 


218 


207 


Pollock: 














Alaska (walleye) .... 


25,422 


24,113 


25,369 


25,839 


24,677 


25,246 


Atlantic or other. . . . 


10,665 


11,081 


8,523 


8,627 


9,681 


8,866 


Whiting: 














Silver (Atl) hake. . . . 


1,081 


890 


577 


595 


855 


847 


Pacific hake 


172 


172 


282 


17 


16 







12,350 
1,385 


10,312 
1,290 


12,284 
1,801 


11,685 
2,179 


9,991 
2,043 


9,851 
2,652 


Unclassified (3) 

Total, blocks and slabs 

Fillets and steaks: 


58,261 


57,381 


58,581 


60,474 


55,857 


60,289 














Cod 


29,984 


25,285 


23,453 


21,339 


21,575 


25,521 


Flounder and sole 


4,056 


5,680 


4,432 


4,116 


6,753 


5,441 


Haddock 


5,621 


1,586 


3,187 


2,290 


1,081 


3,760 


Halibut 


1,052 


1,641 


1,451 


1,418 


2,062 


1,562 


Ocean perch 


1,526 


1,314 


1,757 


1,580 


1,505 


2,032 


Pollock: 














Alaska (walleye) .... 


9,542 


7,395 


8,523 


10,827 


10,255 


9,753 


Atlantic or other. . . . 


6,474 


4,392 


4,417 


4,124 


3,796 


3,157 


Rockfish 


238 


188 


222 


206 


356 


351 


Salmon 


2,211 


4,221 


4,605 


4,811 


4,622 


4,488 


Whiting: 














Silver (Atl) hake. . . . 


4,589 


4,329 


3,079 


2,440 


1,978 


1,704 


Pacific hake 


1,899 


2,541 


2,618 


3,053 


2,969 


3,068 


Unclassified 

Total, fillets and steaks 

Round, dressed, etc.: 


21,555 


21,828 


21,250 


26,060 


24,407 


22,198 


88,747 


80,400 


78,994 


82,264 


81,359 


83,035 














Halibut (exc. California) . 


10,539 


12,748 


14,762 


15,745 


16,241 


14,439 


Sablefish 


1,451 


1,614 


2,195 


1,744 


1,738 


1,448 


Salmon: 














Chinook or king 


3,084 


2,680 


4,096 


4,098 


3,778 


3,076 


Silver or coho 


1,238 


1,864 


3,694 


5,543 


5,162 


4,445 


Chum or fall 


14,785 


26,418 


25,919 


26,743 


28,872 


24,698 


Pink 


1,100 


7,578 


13,180 


11,196 


9,580 


7,654 


Sockeye 


3,288 


5,370 


6,521 


5,661 


4,655 


4,372 


Unclassified 

Total, salmon 


2,776 


3,669 


4,984 


4,209 


4,389 


3,693 


26,271 


47,575 


58,394 


57,450 


56,436 


47,538 














Silver (Atl) hake .... 


91 


224 


279 


204 


133 


15 


Pacific hake 


973 


2,33i 


2,063 


1,089 


1,042 


978 


Unclassified (exc bait) . . 
Total, round, dressed, etc. 


26,461 


35,010 


39,495 


40,192 


42,579 


35,053 


65,786 


99,514 


117,188 


116,424 


118,169 


55,871 



See footnotes at end of table. 



(Continued on next page) 



U.S. COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS 



81 



FROZEN FISHERY PRODUCTS 



U.S. COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1997 -Continued 



Species 


July 


August 


September 


October 


November 


December 


Fish 

Fish Sticks and Portions (2) : 
Analog products 




20,326 


22,020 






30,354 


31,966 


24,803 


26,875 


4,260 


4,192 


4,844 


4,199 


4,102 


3,375 


Surimi: Pollock 


11, 190 


11,851 


13,351 


19,892 


19,780 


18,398 


Other 

Total, Saltwater 

Freshwater : 


102 


58 


57 


51 


54 


145 


248,672 


275,415 


258,218 


310,179 


313,715 


257,075 














Fillets and steaks 


117 


181 


164 


262 


167 


219 


Catfish 


10,120 


10,243 


9,551 


10,295 


11,039 


12,648 




1,602 
182 


674 
343 


645 
185 


611 
124 


1,055 
33 


1,245 
253 


Unclassified (exc bait) .... 
Total, Freshwater .... 
Sait £ Animal Food 

Shellfish 


12,021 


11,441 


10,545 


11,292 


12,294 


14,355 


11,230 


11,458 


11,271 


11,749 


12,102 


11,271 














Clams and clam meats 

Crabs : 


7,192 


6,822 


6,481 


2,447 


2,665 


2,993 
















930 


1,060 


1,225 


1,318 


1,297 


2,643 


King: 














Meat 


48 


54 


35 


66 


61 


69 




5,483 


4,399 


4,808 


8,773 


8,697 


8,581 


Snow: 




746 

10,060 

1,786 


667 
7,692 
2,119 


699 
6,362 
2,569 


785 
5,287 
2,766 


905 
5,400 
3,057 


918 
2,799 
2,359 




Unclassified 

Total/ crabs 

Lobsters : 


19,053 


15,551 


15,698 


18,995 


15,417 


17,369 














Spiny (tails) 


2,139 


3,211 


3,560 


4, 174 


4,470 


4,740 


Unclassified (whole Se meat) . 


952 


1,297 


1,437 


1,553 


1,470 


1,832 




1,274 


1,256 


1,164 


1,118 


703 


699 


Scallop meats 


3,246 


2,957 


2,887 


2,691 


2,259 


2,313 


Shrimp : 














Raw, headless 


7,037 


9,408 


11,336 


13,244 


11,055 


15,199 




5,168 
8,584 
8,211 


5,567 
8,714 
7,740 


5,813 

10,684 

8,348 


5,882 
11,190 
11,334 


6,112 
16,522 
12,119 


6,412 
12,417 
13,664 


Peeled 


Unclassified 

Total, shrimp 


29,000 


31,429 


36,181 


41,550 


45,808 


47,552 


7,412 
2,906 


6,004 
3,151 


4,768 
3,266 


4,254 
6,876 


3,867 
7,080 


3,066 
6,546 


Unclassified shellfish 

Total, shell fiBb 

Total, fish and Bhellfiab 
Cured fish (all categories) . . . 
Crand total 


73,174 


72,118 


75,442 


83,758 


87,739 


87,250 


345,097 


370,433 


355, 47ff 


416,978 


425,850 


409,965 


1,025 


712 


571 


90,815 


742 


1,051 


346,122 


371,145 


355,447 


507,793 


426,592 


411,016 



(1) Unclassified may also include blocks and slabs made from species listed separately. 

(2) Fish sticks and portions include all species that are either cook or uncooked. 



NOTE: --Data includes imported fishery products. Data for these tables were collected from 
public and private warehouses where fishery products are normally stored for 30 days or more. 



82 



FOREIGN TRADE 

IMPORTS 



U.S. IMPORTS OF EDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1997 
FROM MAJOR MARKETS 



Millions of Dollars 
1,500 



1,000 - 



500 - 





_l_^^^B»^J- 



Canada Thailand Ecuador Mexico China Chile Russia Japan Iceland E.U. 



Millions of Dollars 
3,000 



U.S. IMPORTS OF EDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1997 
BY MAJOR GROUP 




Shrimp Tuna Lobsters Salmon Groundfish Canned Scallops Fish blocks 

fillets tuna 



FOREIGN TRADE 



83 



IMPORTS 



FISHERY PRODUCTS IMPORTS, BY PRINCIPAL ITEMS, 1996 AND 1997 



Item . 


1996 


1997 1 


Edible fishery products: 
Fresh and frozen: 
Whole or eviscerated: 


Th9v§?n4 
pounds 

64,923 

31,371 

59,760 

142,258 

528,703 

228,211 

26,133 

45,091 
178,209 
227,036 
234,210 

29,312 
578,908 

11,272 

37,948 

25,082 

58,686 

219,702 


M^trig 

29,449 
14,230 
27,107 
64,528 
239,818 
103,516 

11, 854 

20,453 

80,835 

102,983 

106,237 

13,296 

262,591 

5,113 

17,213 
11,377 
26,620 
99,656 


Thousand 
c^plj^rg 

68,072 

56,929 

47,080 

304,612 

509,783 

274,515 

74,688 

96,092 
310,417 
448,706 
213,323 

15,956 
2,448,468 

50,043 

220, 988 
224,872 
197,855 
481,321 


Thousand 

ppvnd? 

76,224 

36,993 

63,700 

162,803 

438,493 

253,280 

30, 719 

42,679 
176,125 
265,282 
233,972 

22,553 
644,702 

14,462 

40, 798 

24,674 

60,146 

273,933 


Metric 
tpng 

34,575 
16,780 
28,894 
73,847 
198,899 
114,887 

13,934 

19,359 

79, 890 

120,331 

106,129 

10,230 

292,435 

6,560 

18,506 

11, 192 

27,282 

124,255 


Thousand 
dollars 

72,031 

70,861 

52,363 

344,427 

494,181 

330,870 

83,563 

92,067 
334,206 
551,753 
231,008 

10,879 
2,942,635 

66,918 

238,881 
242,181 
237,078 
626, 023 


Flatfish 


Groundfish 


Tuna (1) 


Other 


Fillets and steaks: 

Freshwater 

Flatfish 


Other 










Lobster: 






Other fish and shellfish. 
Total, fresh and frozen.. 

Canned : 


2,726,817 


1,236,876 


6,043,720 


2,861,538 


1,297,985 


7,021,925m 


7,050 

1,563 
20,274 

2,266 
40, 926 
193,037 
11,054 
12,773 
798 
10,198 

3,563 

8,344 
42,602 


3, 198 

709 

9,196 

1,028 

18,564 

87,561 

5,014 

5,794 

362 

4,626 

1,616 

3,785 
19,324 


23,197 

2,458 
10,758 

6,219 

46,532 

215,892 

12,410 

48,719 

7,271 
28,753 

9,032 

13,948 
48,517 


6,942 
1,488 

28,779 
1,228 

42,771 

212,171 

9,855 

15,871 

176 

9,934 

3,620 

8,523 
45,732 


3,149 

675 

13,054 

557 

19,401 

96,240 

4,470 

7,199 

80 

4,506 

1,642 

3,866 
20,744 


22,247 
2,078 

15,912 
4,793 

49,302 
249,963 

10,807 

66,521 
1,595 

24, 795 

10, 954 

14,512 
51,832 






















Balls, cakes, and 


Other fish and shellfish... 
Total, canned 

Cured: 


354,449 


160,777 


473,706 


387,090 


175,583 


525,311 , 


22,064 

36,971 

8,382 


10,008 

16,770 

3,802 


60,201 
47,057 
24,462 


21, 914 
36,887 
10,234 


9,940 

16,732 

4,642 


58,030 
46,698 
26, 875 


Pickled or salted 

Smoked or kippered 

Total, cured 


67,417 


30,580 


131,720 


69,035 


31,314 


131,603 


b,UBy 

2,661 
13,355 


2,30B 
1,207 
6,058 


lib, 30b 

8,252 

36,911 


3,336 
13,565 


1,944 
1,513 
6,153 


ji,iby 

12,243 
31, 992 




Other fish and shellfish. . 
Total edible fishery 
products 

Nonedible fishery products: 


3,169,737 


1,437,806 


6,729,614 


3,338,849 


1,514,492 


7,754,243 


135,561 
35,622 


61,490 
16,158 


33,981 

18,967 

e, 211 ,193 


142,049 
25,622 


64,433 
11,622 


36,484 

23,388 

6,714,211 


Fish oils 


Other 


Total nonediJble fishery- 
fishery products 






6,330,741 




. 


6,774,083 




- 


- 


13,060,355 


- 


- 


14,528,326 





(1) Includes loins and discs. 
Note: --Data include imports into the United States and Puerto Rico and landings of tuna by fore 
American Samoa. Statistics on imports are the weight of individual products as exported, i.e 
whole, headed, etc. 

Imports and Exports of Fishery Products, Annual Summary, 1997, Current Fishery Statistics 
No. 9702 provides additional information. 
Source : --U. S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



ign vessels at 
fillets, steak 



84 



FOREIGN TRADE 



IMPORTS 
EDIBLE AND NONEDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS IMPORTS. 1988-97 



Year 




Edible 


1 Nonedible 


Total 


1988 


Thousand 
pounds 

2,967,755 
3,243,022 
2,884,596 
3,014,819 
2,893,954 
2,917,160 
3,034,841 
3,066,458 
3,169,787 
3,338,849 


1,346,165 
1,471,025 
1,308,444 
1,367,513 
1,312,689 
1,323,215 
1,376,595 
1,390,936 
1,437,806 
1,514,492 


----- -Thousand do],iars- 

5,441,628 3,430,369 
5,497,849 4,106,507 
5,233,167 3,814,513 
5,671,887 3,763,173 
5,705,876 4,165,386 
5,848,738 4,773,649 
6,645,132 5,341,740 
6,791,690 5,659,933 
6,729,614 6,330,741 
7,754,243 6,774,083 


8,871,997 

9,604,356 

9,047,680 

9,435,060 

9,871,262 

10,622,387 

11,986,872 

12,451,623 

13,060,355 

14,528,326 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 

1996 

1997 



Source: --U. S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 




Millions of Dollars 

16,000 

14,000 

12,000 

10,000 

8,000 

6,000 

4,000 

2,000 




U.S. FISHERY PRODUCT IMPORTS 
1988-1997 



^ ^ ^ i 

i ^ ^ i i i I H 



:i i i i 



s s 




D Edible value □ Nonedible value 



1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 



FOREIGN TRADE 



85 



IMPORTS 
EDIBLE AND NONEDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS IMPORTS, 1997 



Continent and Country 




Edible 


1 


Nonedible 1 


Total 


North America: 


Thws^nd 

pounds 

562,222 
146,520 
42,663 
29,705 
35,571 
82,421 


N?tri? 

255,022 
66,461 
19,352 
13,474 
16,135 
37,386 


1,306,292 
492,190 
116,727 
73,591 
111,281 
271,644 


Thousand dollars- - - - - 

783,825 2,090,117 

201,478 693,668 

6,495 123,222 

47,742 121,333 

8 111,289 

140,171 411,815 










Other 


Total 


399,102 


407,830 


2,371,725 


1,175,715 


3,551,444 


South America: 


240,460 
164,278 
29,048 
18,206 
72,754 
68,806 


109,072 
74,516 
13,176 
8,258 
33,001 
31,210 


714,923 

316,744 

65,773 

69,577 

88,785 

190,446 


9,316 
18,985 
62,489 
43,609 
15,853 
59,864 


724,239 
335,729 
128,262 
113,186 
104,638 
250,310 


Chile 








Other 


Total 


593,551 


269,233 


1,446,248 


210,116 


1,656,364 


Europe : 

European Union: 


1,243 
1,885 
1,248 
8,675 
9,056 
24,187 


564 

855 

566 

3,935 

4,108 

10,971 


3,878 

4,281 

2,460 

19,501 

25,137 

49,540 


1,318,889 
567,169 
258,469 
150,872 
65,982 
171,303 


1,322,767 
571,450 
260,929 
170,373 
91,119 
220,843 






United Kingdom. . . 

Netherlands 

Other 




46,294 


20,999 


104,797 


2,532,684 


2,637,481 


Other : 

Russian Republic. . 


129,154 

84,859 

70,975 

613 

4 

10,714 


58,584 

38,492 

32,194 

278 

2 

4,860 


230,124 

184,299 

125,497 

1,617 

69 

19,399 


3,194 

6,181 

24,825 

116,354 

92,228 

45,810 


233,318 
190,480 
150,322 
117,971 
92,297 
65,209 






Switzerland 

Other 




296,320 


134,410 


561,005 


288,592 


849,597 




348,047 
99,121 
72,456 

233,163 
9,134 

569,907 


157,873 
44,961 
32,866 

105,762 
4,143 

258,508 


1,166,988 

212,238 

170,858 

321,185 

14, 880 

1,048,848 


383,335 
537,006 
362,665 
184,885 
419,097 
543,449 


1,550,323 
749,244 
533,523 
506,070 
433,977 

1,592,297 










Other 


Total 


1,331,828 


604,113 


2,534,557 


2,430,437 


5,365,434 




75,135 
6,878 
1,155 
6,651 
7,928 

12,926 


34,081 
3,120 
524 
3,017 
3,596 
5,863 


140,705 

54,337 

2,210 

12,479 

8,961 

9,335 


7,979 
49,909 
27,145 

2,113 
29 

1,913 


148,684 

104,246 

29,355 

14,592 

8,990 

11,248 




French Polynesia. . . . 


Western Samoa 

Other 


Total 


110,673 


50,201 


228,027 


89,088 


317,115 


Africa: 

South Africa 


16,903 
12,890 

6,808 
11,731 

1,689 
11,060 


7,667 
5,847 
3,088 
5,321 
766 
5,0l7 


31,249 
30,854 
18,115 
14,541 
3,021 
9,66.4 


20,973 

693 

4,837 

202 

5,209 

11,533 


52,222 
31,547 
22,952 
14,743 
8,230 
21,197 








Other 

Total 


61,081 


27,705 


107,444 


43,447 


150,891 


Grand total . . . 


3,338,849 


1,514,452 


7,754,243 


6,774,083 


14,528,326 



Source: --U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



86 



FOREIGN TRADE 



IMPORTS 



REGULAR AND MINCED FISH BLOCKS AND SLABS IMPORTS, 
BY SPECIES AND TYPE, 1996 AND 1997 



Species and type 


1996 


1997 




Th<?vssn<S 


M?tri? 


TiiQvs?n<^ 


1hW§?Ti^ 


I^?t}ri? 


Thousand 




PPUD'SS 


t<?PS 


(^Qll^XS 


P'?Mn<?s 


t<?PS 


dollars 


Regular blocks and slabs: 














Cod 


23,439 


10,632 


33,755 


32,723 


14,843 


49,872 


Flatfish 


3,433 

12,740 

1,111 

144,234 


1,557 

5,779 

504 

65,424 


6,461 

18,122 

1,872 

109,985 


6,951 

14,650 

578 

133,528 


3,153 

6,645 

262 

60,568 


11,050 

21,378 

863 

101,772 






Pollock 


Whiting 


16,830 


7,634 


14,310 


17,368 


7,878 


16,339 


Other 


6,903 


3,131 


6,450 


9,630 


4,368 


12,069 


Total 

Minced blocks and slabs. . . . 


208,690 


S4,661 


190,955 


215,427 


97,717 


213,343 


25,520 


11,576 


22,368 


18,545 


8,412 


17,665 


234,210 


106,237 


213,323 


233,572 


106,129 


231,008 




Source: --U.S. Department of 


Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 









REGULAR AND MINCED FISH BLOCKS AND SLABS IMPORTS, 
BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN, 1996 AND 1997 



Country 


1996 


1997 1 




Th<?ussn<A 


M?tri<; 


Thwssn<^ 


T}ig)yg?nc? 


N?tri? 


Th<?vs?n<S 




Dounds 


tws 


dollars 


Dounds 


tPPS, 


dollars 




81,120 
74,848 
12,335 


36,796 

33,951 

5,595 


59,366 
61,670 
17,485 


81,052 
67,833 
18,219 


36,765 

30,769 

8,264 


61,042 
58,146 
26,415 




Norway 


Canada 


15,227 


6,907 


15,454 


13,774 


6,248 


16,587 


Iceland 


16,380 


7,430 


22,859 


9,806 


4,448 


14,917 


Denmark 


5,333 


2,419 


8,296 


6,252 


2,836 


10,404 


Argentina 


9,257 


4,199 


6,890 


10,487 


4,757 


8,827 




3,084 
642 


1,399 
291 


4,274 
757 


3,602 
3,444 


1,634 
1,562 


5,248 
4,535 


New Zealand 


Other 

Total 


15,983 


7,250 


16,272 


19,502 


8,846 


24,887 


234,210 


106,237 


213,323 


233,972 


106,129 


231,008 



Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



GROUNDFISH FILLET AND STEAK IMPORTS, BY SPECIES, 1996 AND 1997 (1) 



(1) Does not include data on fish blocks and slabs. 

(2) Includes some cjuantities of cusk, hake, and pollock fillets. 



Species 


1996 


1997 1 


Cod 


TJigus^pe^, 
pounds 

74,191 
79,031 
24,987 


tpng 

33,653 
35,848 
11,334 


Th(?vg?n(^ 
depll^rg 

163,986 

102,752 

43,679 


95,051 
59,848 
21,226 


N?tri?, 

43,115 

27,147 

9,628 


dollars 

210,068 
84,788 
39,350 


Haddock (2) 


Ocean perch 

Total 


178,209 


80,835 


310,417 


176,125 


75,850 


334,206 





Source : --U. S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Cenus . 



FOREIGN TRADE 



87 



IMPORTS 



CANNED TUNA NOT IN OIL, QUOTA AND IMPORTS, 1988-97 



Quota 
(1) 



Over quota 
(2) 



1988. 
1989. 
1990. 
1991. 
1992. 
1993. 
1994. 
1995. 
1996. 
1997. 



Thousand 
pounds 
85, 186 
76, 733 
87, 157 
75, 093 
73,724 
72,681 
73,294 
73,367 
80, 027 
78,620 



Metr 




Thousand 
pounds 
193,784 
234,323 
171,472 
237,237 
259,739 
144,287 
168,224 
126,176 
117,205 
139,715 



Metric 

tons 
87,900 

106,288 
77, 779 

107,610 

117,817 
65,448 
76,306 
57,233 
53, 164 
63,374 



Thousand 
pounds 
278,970 
311,056 
258,628 
312,330 
333,463 
216,968 
241,518 
199,543 
197,232 
218,335 




109,552 
90,512 
89,464 
99, 036 



(1) Imports have been subject to tariff quotas since April 14, 1956, and are based on 20 
percent of the previous year's domestic pack, excluding the pack in American Samoa. 
Dutiable in 1956 to 1967 at 12.5 percent ad valorem; 1968, 11 percent; 1969, 10 percent; 
1970, 8.5 percent; 1971, 7 percent; and 1972 to 1997, 6 percent. 



(2) Dutiable in 1972 to 1997, 12.5 percent. 

Note: --Data in this table will not agree with tuna import data released by the U.S. Department 
of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Any tuna entered for consumption or withdrawn from a 
warehouse for consumption during the calendar year, except for receipts from insular 
possessions of the U.S., is subject to this quota. 

Source: --U.S . Department of the Treasury, U.S. Customs Service. 




CANNED TUNA, BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN, 1996 AND 1997 



Country 



Thailand 

Philippines 

Indonesia 

Malaysia 

Mexico 

Namibia 

Ecuador 

Fiji 

Spain 

Other 

Total 

Source : --U.S . Department of 



Thousand 
pounds 

95, 869 

64,639 

28, 168 

2, 079 

375 

906 

64 

247 

690 



193,037 



Metric 
tons 

43,486 

29,320 

12,777 

943 

170 

411 

29 

112 

313 



87,561 



Thousand 
dollars 

113,345 

60,569 

35,150 

3,753 

111 

852 
106 
675 

1,165 



Thousand 
pounds 

99,513 

80,677 

20, 911 

2,784 

4, 868 

825 

1,058 

536 

196 

802 



215,892 



212,171 




96,240 



Thousand 
dollars 



129 
80 
27 
4 
3 
1 
1 



, 163 
, 161 
,215 
,894 
,789 
,342 
,033 
756 
499 
, 111 



Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



88 



FOREIGN TRADE 



IMPORTS 



SHRIMP IMPORTS, BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN, 1996 AND 1997 



Country 


1996 


1997 1 


North America: 


Thousand 
pounds 

67,873 

19,092 

19,559 

12,079 

7,432 

19, 744 

9,178 

3,364 

1, 105 

939 

64 


t<?ng 

30,787 

8,660 

8,872 

5,479 

3,371 

8, 956 

4, 163 

1,526 

501 

426 

29 


Thpvs^rid 
dollars 

327,720 

68,574 

69,564 

38,624 

25,298 

26,611 

29,595 

15, 511 

4,292 

2, 503 

246 


Thpvs^na 
Dounds 

74, 864 

23,236 

18,027 

7,390 

7,564 

11,254 

4,773 

3,951 

1,625 

820 

79 


Metric, 

33,958 

10,540 

8,177 

3,352 

3,431 

5,105 

2,165 

1,792 

737 

372 

36 


Thousand 
dollars 

374,102 

87,128 

70,177 

29,974 

28,663 

26,326 

19, 055 

15, 870 

7,399 

1,873 

235 






El Salvador 

Nicaragua 








Greenland 

Other 


160,429 


72,770 


608,538 


153 583 


69 665 


660,802 


South America: 

Ecuador 

Venezuela 






97,194 
15,119 
4,469 
6, 695 
8, 814 
1, 997 

664 


44,087 
6, 858 

2, 027 
3,037 

3, 998 
906 

301 


369,817 
47,862 
18, 196 
26, 506 
22,220 
6, 528 

2,353 


140,517 

19,098 

9,883 

7,172 

9,453 

1,215 

1,396 

750 

42 


63,738 

8,663 

4,483 

3,253 

4,288 

551 

633 

340 

19 


583,262 

76,162 

45,577 

28,539 

25,675 

4,856 

4,255 

2,740 

46 




Guyana 

Brazil 


Chile 


Europe : 

European Union: 


134,952 


61,214 


493,482 


189,525 


85,968 


771,112 


787 
2 

256 

7 

22 

291 


357 
1 

116 

3 

10 

132 


2,112 

7 

567 

20 

48 

931 


397 
44 
53 
35 
11 
20 


180 

20 

24 

16 

5 

9 


798 

241 

204 

68 

29 

74 




United Kingdom 

Germany 

Netherlands 

Other 

Total 

Other: 

Iceland 

Norway 

Other 

Total 

Asia : 

Thailand 


1,365 


619 


3,685 


560 


254 


1,414 


494 

291 

2 


224 

132 

1 


1,636 

1,032 

20 


313 
119 


142 
54 


999 
372 


787 


357 


2,688 


432 


196 


1,371 


160,310 

21,792 

41,773 

20,357 

17,077 

5,686 

2,676 

5,355 

1,312 

1, 958 

6,069 


72,716 
9,885 

18,948 
9,234 
7, 746 
2,579 
1,214 
2,429 
595 
888 
2,753 


888,410 

110, 711 

118, 590 

109,623 

35,407 

28,226 

12,332 

14,089 

5,363 

5,976 

19,301 


161, 822 

28,272 

44,103 

21,539 

28,393 

7,837 

2,617 

2,967 

1,398 

811 

4,070 


73,402 

12,824 

20,005 

9,770 

12, 879 

3,555 

1,187 

1,346 

634 

368 

1,846 


920,946 

161,615 

138,698 

132,487 

67,763 

46,234 

12,983 

11,111 

6,763 

4,341 

15,189 




Bangladesh 


Viet Nam 




Burma 


Other 


Total 


284,365 


128,587 


1,348,028 


3 03,829 


137,816 


1,518,130 


60 
514 


27 
233 


435 
644 


35 
357 


16 
162 


276 
484 


Africa 


Grand total 


582,471 


264,207 


2,457,500 


648,322 


294,077 


2,953,589 



Note :- -Statistics on imports are the weights of the individual products as received, 

raw headless, peeled, etc. 

Source :- -U.S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



FOREIGN TRADE 
IMPORTS 

SHRIMP IMPORTS, BY TYPE OF PRODUCT, 1996 AND 1997 



89 



Type of product 


1996 


1997 1 


Shell-on (heads off) 

Peeled: 

Canned 

Not breaded: 


Thousand 
pounds 

318,000 

3,563 

206,670 

53,766 

472 


144,244 

1,616 

93,745 

24,388 

214 


Thousand 
dollars 

1,393,216 

9,032 

763,008 

289,809 

2,435 


Thousand 
Dounds 

343,642 

3,620 

235,550 

65,060 

450 


Metric 
tons 

155, 875 

1,642 

106,845 

29,511 

204 


Thousand 
dollars 

1,626,734 

10,954 

952,130 

361,538 

2,233 


Other 


Breaded 

Total 


SS2,471 


2S4,207 


2,457,500 


648,322 


294,077 


2,953,589 





Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 




FISH MEAL AND SCRAP IMPORTS, BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN, 1996 AND 1997 



Country 



Peru. . . 
Mexico. 
Canada . 
Iceland 
Panama . 
Chile. . 
Japan. . 
France . 
Ukraine 
Other. . 



Total 



Thousand 
pounds 

16,883 

38,197 

13,419 

11,243 

11, 155 

30,554 

73 

24 

152 

13,860 



m 5,361 



tons 

7,658 

17,326 

6, 087 



5, 

5, 

13, 



100 

060 

859 

33 

11 

69 

287 



€1,490 



Thousand 
dollars 



633 
968 
281 
302 
965 
076 
84 
20 
102 
550 



TtT9ygan4 

pounds 

47,862 

32,968 

16, 788 

17,485 

20, 046 

6,276 

106 

165 

141 

212 



33,981 



142,049 



Metric 
tons 



21,710 
14, 954 



615 

931 

093 

847 

48 

75 

64 

96 



64,433 



Thousand 
dollars 



11, 017 
7, 858 



671 
229 
923 
602 
671 
120 
94 
299 



36,484 



Source: --U.S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



90 



FOREIGN TRADE 

EXPORTS 

















U.S. EXPORTS OF EDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1997 
TO MAJOR MARKETS 






Millions of Dollars 


















1,250 


■ 






1,000 


I 






750 


1 






500 


1 






250 



1 ■ 1 _ _ I _ 






Japan Other Asia Canada Mexico Latin E.U. Other 

America Europe 


Oceania 

















U.S. EXPORTS OF EDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1997 
BY MAJOR GROUP 




Millions of Dollars 






400 


' ^ ■ 




300 


III 




200 
100 

Q 


lllllll 


I 




Roe Surimi Salmon Lobsters Flatfish Canned Shrimp 

salmon 


Crabs 



\ 



FOREIGN TRADE 
EXPORTS 

FISHERY PRODUCTS EXPORTS, BY PRINCIPAL ITEMS, 1996 AND 1997 (1) 



91 



Item 


1996 


1997 1 


Edible fishery products: 


Th<?ussn<A 


M?tri? 


Thpusand 


Th<?y§aud 


M^tri? 


Thousand 


Fresh and frozen: 


Dounds 


t9n§ 


dpllars 


ppunds 


t<?ns 


dollars 


Whole or eviscerated: 
















4,749 
179,161 


2,154 
81,267 


6,742 
140,753 


7,972 
238,637 


3,616 
108,245 


8,330 
148,158 


Flatfish 


Groundf ish 


139,840 


63,431 


112,375 


129,915 


58,929 


97,640 


Herring 


79,866 


36,227 


53,131 


87,633 


39,750 


48,245 


Sablef ish 


37,716 


17,108 


93,756 


28,770 


13,050 


64,314 


Salmon 


276,973 


125,634 


469,812 


189,942 


86,157 


307,521 


Tuna 


31,382 


14,235 


38,278 


24,092 


10,928 


34,527 


Other 


299,058 


135,652 


245,564 


264,612 


120,027 


226,043 


Fillets, and steaks: 
















710 
41,691 


322 

18,911 


2,206 
44,399 


379 
23,367 


172 
10,599 


747 
25,820 


Groundf ish 


Other 


31,967 


14,500 


52,887 


31,268 


14,183 


47,608 


Blocks and slabs 


64,229 


29,134 


60,481 


64,101 


29,076 


61,786 


Surimi 


284,702 


129,140 


269,754 


310,242 


140,725 


330,976 


Fish sticks 


21,729 


9,856 


29,555 


25,009 


11,344 


31,508 


Clams 


2,661 


1,207 


4,594 


1, 803 


818 


3,867 


Crabs 


46,742 


21,202 


162,403 


43,133 


19,565 


108,661 


Crabmeat 


3,106 


1,409 


6,094 


3,399 


1,542 


7,818 




41,398 
6,191 


18,778 
2,808 


195,261 
22,318 


47,249 
9,861 


21,432 
4,473 


208,646 
37,116 


Scallops (meats) 




5,622 
38,638 


2,550 
17,526 


12,998 
145,064 


7,321 
34,813 


3,321 
15,791 


19,177 
133,442 


Shrimp 


Squid 


137,042 


62,162 


69,419 


169,509 


76,889 


91,996 


Other fish and shellfish 
Canned : 


28,342 


10,702 


56,654 


34,081 


11,843 


60,784 


1,798,76$ 


815,915 


2,294,498 


1,769,136 


802,475 


2,104,730 
















95,530 
12,207 


43,332 
5,537 


154,093 
9,623 


81,621 
9,321 


37,023 
4,228 


135,437 
8,115 


Sardines 


Tuna 


9,866 


4,475 


14,937 


9,967 


4,521 


15,649 


Abalone 


805 


365 


5,427 


392 


178 


7,884 


Crabmeat 


337 


153 


1,358 


608 


276 


1,332 


Shrimp 


2,665 


1,209 


11,581 


1,470 


667 


7,029 


Squid 


7,608 


3,451 


4,404 


5,725 


2,597 


3,504 


Other fish and shellfish 


26,389 


11, 970 


22,393 


20,386 


9,247 


23,761 


155,407 


70,492 


223,816 


129,492 


58,737 


202,711 


Cured: 














Dried 


9,431 


4,278 


19,653 


3,221 


1,461 


10,347 


Pickled or salted 


12,665 


5,745 


19,090 


6,691 


3,035 


8,048 


Smoked or kippered 


1,096 


497 


3,150 


679 


308 


2,503 


23,192 


10,520 


41,893 


10,591 


4,804 


20,898 y 


Caviar and roe : 














Herring 


34,806 


15,788 


51,638 


18,483 


8,384 


19,763 


Pollock 


29,284 


13,283 


154,633 


37,209 


16,878 


162,422 


Salmon 


27,952 


12,679 


SI , lis 


17,491 


7,934 


63,487 


Sea urchin 


7,167 


3,251 


107,384 


6,049 


2,744 


87,090 


Other 

Total, caviar and roe. . . . 
Prepared meals 


11,680 


5,298 


39,467 


10,725 


4,865 


36,361 


110,889 


50,299 


450,897 


89,959 


40,805 


369,123 


1, 975 


555 


2,S4S 


i,S52 


840 


2,551 


Other fish and shellfish. 
Total edible fishery 


21,826 


9,900 


18,330 


17,859 


8,101 


13,029 














products 


2,112,055 


958,022 


3,032,282 


2,018,889 


915,762 


2,713,082 


Nonedible fishery products: 














Meal and scrap 


186,412 


84,556 


52,931 


216,289 


98,108 


57,197 


Fish oils 


187,294 


84,956 


36,423 


215,255 


97,639 


53,716 


Other 

Total nonedible fishery- 


- 


- 


5,568,238 


- 


- 


6,583,336 
















- 


- 


5,621,169 


- 


- 


6,640,533 


Grand total 




- 


8,653,451 


- 


- 


9,353,615 





(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-exports) 
Source : --U.S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



92 



FOREIGN TRADE 



EXPORTS 





FISHERY PRODUCTS EXPORTS, 1988-97 (1) 




Year 


Edible | Nonedible 


Total 


1988 


Thgusand 

1,085, 935 
1,405, 977 
1,947,292 
2,058,594 
2,087,606 
1,986,027 
1,978,507 
2,047,181 
2,112,055 
2,018,889 


Metri? 
tQns 

492,577 
637,747 
883,286 
933,772 
946,932 
900,856 
897,445 
928,595 
958,022 
915,762 


2,213,326 
2,355,603 
2,881,262 
3,155,771 
3,465,667 
3,076,813 
3,126,120 
3,262,242 
3,032,282 
2,713,082 


Thousand dollars 

125,061 
2,582,538 
3,084,677 
3,386,037 
3,653,965 
3,847,911 
4,254,741 
5,005, 878 
5,621,169 
6,640,533 


2,338,387 
4,938,141 
5,965,939 
6,541,808 
7,119,632 
6,924,724 
7,380,861 
8,268,120 
8,653,451 
9,353,615 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 


(1) Figures reflect 


both domestic and foreign (re-exports) . 







NOTE: --The increase in the nonedible value beginning in 1989 is due to re -examination of 
commodities that are considered to be based on fishery products including fish, shellfish, 
aquatic plants and animals and any products thereof, including processed and manufactured 
products . 

Source: --U.S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



Millions of Dollars 



U.S. FISHERY PRODUCT EXPORTS 
1988-1997 




1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 



I Edible value □ Nonedible value 



FOREIGN TRADE 



93 



EXPORTS 



Continent and Country 



EDIBLE AND NONEDIBLE FISHERY PRODUCTS EXPORTS, 1997 (1) 

Edible I Nonedible 



North America: 

Canada 

Mexico 

Panama 

Dominican Republic. . . 
Netherlands Antilles. 

Other 

Total 

South America: 

Brazil 

Argentina 

Venezuela 

Colombia 

Chile 

Other 

Total 

Europe : 

European Union: 

United Kingdom 

Netherlands 

France 

Germany 

Italy 

Other 

Total 

Other : 

Switzerland 

Russian Federation. 

Norway 

Poland 

Turkey 

Other 

Total 

Asia: 

Japan 

Hong Kong 

South Korea 

Taiwan 

Singapore 

Other 

Total 

Oceania: 

Australia 

New Zealand 

French Polynesia 

New Caledonia 

Fiji 

Other , 

Total 

Africa: 

South Africa 

Egypt 

Nigeria 

Zimbabwe 

Mauritius 

Other 

Total 

Grand total. . . 



Thousand 
pounds 

278,216 

26,197 

2,262 

5,214 

1,567 
14,755 



328, 212 



1,700 
860 

2,498 

1,806 
196 

2,873 



9,932 



48,933 
17,471 
58,012 
14,597 
22,291 
91, 121 



252,424 



1,060 
5,243 
14,295 
1,627 
686 
8, 944 



31,854 



879, 181 
21,107 

134,547 

20,818 

3,602 

286,360 



1,345,615 



42,606 

2,297 

897 

42 

Bll 

939 



47,659 



2,018,889 



Metric 
tons 

126,198 

11,883 

1,026 

2,365 

711 
6,693 



148,876 



390 
,133 

819 

89 

,303 



4,505 



22,196 
7,925 

26,314 
6,621 

10,111 

41,332 



114,455 



492,650 

45,271 

2,641 

6,001 

2,320 

23,323 



-Thousand dollars- 

1,343,513 

441,049 

63,687 

55,023 

55,913 

209,399 



572,206 



,575 
823 

,410 

,887 
445 

,568 



11,708 



86,250 
22,936 
82,596 
22,242 
37,453 
100,770 



352,247 



481 

2,378 

6,484 

738 

311 

4,057 



14,449 



398,794 

9,574 

61,030 

9,443 

1,634 

129,892 



610,367 



19,326 

1,042 

407 

19 

398 

426 



21,618 



878 
403 



1,448 



915,762 



2,773 

8,124 

13,276 

653 

586 

5,515 



30,927 



2,168,584 



174,743 
72,323 
66,133 
56,725 
57, 050 
86,480 



513,454 



257,875 
197,435 
129,958 
147,191 
121,231 
312,205 



1,165,895 



567,743 

18,844 

13,639 

9,477 

7,488 

33,481 



650,672 



1,304,639 

48,710 

125,190 

61,305 

9,804 

159,562 



1,705,210 



28,537 

2,655 

1,096 

49 

484 

895 



33,716 



2,025 
689 



3,068 



2,713,082 



610, ill 
356,023 
180,333 
142,356 
177,926 
448,886 



1,916,001 



137,618 

23,479 

1,334 

903 

294 

1,414 



165,042 



40,205 
6,880 
3,305 
2,823 
1,516 
6,156 



60,885 



6,640,533 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-exports) 
Source: --U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



,836,163 

486,320 

66,328 

61,024 

58,233 

232,722 



2,740,750 



179,318 
73,146 
67,543 
58,612 
57,495 
89, 048 



525,162 



344,125 
220,371 
212,554 
169,433 
158,684 
412,975 



1,518,142 



570,516 
26,968 
26, 915 
10,130 
8,074 
38,996 

681,599 



1,915,116 
404,733 
305,523 
203,661 
187,730 
608,448 

3,625, 21X 



166,155 

26,134 

2,430 

952 

778 

2,309 



198,758 



42,230 
7,569 
3,305 
2,823 
1,516 
6,510 



63,953 



9,353,615 



94 



FOREIGN TRADE 
EXPORTS 



FRESH AND FROZEN SHRIMP EXPORTS, 
BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION, 1996 AND 1997 (1) 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-export) . 
Source :- -U. S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



Country 


1996 


1997 1 




Thousand 
pounds 

19, 015 

7,211 

2,284 

1,975 

904 

340 

1, 687 

820 

500 

3, 902 


Metric 
tons 

8,625 

3,271 

1,036 

896 

410 

154 

765 

372 

227 

1,770 


Thousand 
dollars 

74,828 

24,123 

11,286 

5,071 

3,869 

752 

6, 086 

3, 567 

2, 027 

13,455 


Thpy^^nd 
PQVnds 

17,381 

8,023 

1,620 

1,495 

935 

988 

809 

628 

267 

2,668 


Metric 
.tpn? 

7,884 
3,639 
735 
678 
424 
448 
367 
285 
121 
1,210 


Thousand 
dollar? 

71,724 
24,772 
9,366 
4, 119 
3,558 
3,261 
2, 958 
2,684 
1,258 
9,742 




















Total 


38,638 


17,526 


145,064 


34,813 


15,791 


133,442 






CANNED SHRIMP EXPORTS, 
BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION, 1996 AND 1997 (1) 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-export) 
Source : --U. S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



Country 


1996 


1997 1 


Canada 


Thousand 
pounds 

963 
132 
437 

57 
207 

71 

538 

84 

176 


.tons 

437 
60 

198 
26 
94 
32 

244 
38 
80 


Thpvs^nd 
d<?ll?r? 

4,739 
818 

2,281 
348 

1,315 
197 

427. 
520 
936 


ThpMs^nd 
poynd? 

423 

247 

229 

163 

75 

49 

24 

220 

13 

26 


Metric 
tons 

192 

112 

104 

74 

34 

22 

11 

100 

6 

12 


Thousand 
dollars 

2,462 

1,460 

1,271 

577 

403 

218 

206 

175 

74 

183 


Thailand 


Ecuador 








Other 


Total 


2,665 


1,209 


11,581 


1,470 


667 


. 7,025 





FOREIGN TRADE 



95 



EXPORTS 



FRESH AND FROZEN SALMON EXPORTS, WHOLE OR EVISCERATED, 
BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION, 1996 AND 1997 (1) 



Country 



Japan . . . 
Canada . . 
France . . 
Belgium. 
Denmark . 
Spain. . . 
Taiwan. . 
Germany . 
China . . . 
Other. . . 



Thousand 
pounds 

176,441 

55, 565 

11, 180 

4,559 



337 
293 
901 
057 
156 



14,484 



276,973 



Metric 
tons 



80, 033 
25,204 



071 
068 
421 
040 
316 
933 
978 
570 



125,634 



Thousand 
dollars 



Thousand 
pounds 



344, 

73, 

11, 

5, 

5, 

1, 

5, 

2, 

3, 

16, 



756 
794 
068 
288 
973 
866 
333 
337 
182 
215 



113, 

35, 

11, 

3, 

3, 

3, 

1, 

2, 

2, 

13, 



477 
289 
058 
662 
366 
186 
382 
899 
533 
089 



Metric 
tons 



51,473 
16, 007 



016 
661 
527 
445 
627 
315 
149 
937 



86,157 



Thousand 
dollars 

208,038 

52,136 

12, 750 

4,383 



566 
231 
230 
849 
513 



14, 825 



307,521 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign 
Source : --U.S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of 



(re 
the 



exports) 
Census . 




CANNED SALMON EXPORTS, 
BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION. 1996 AND 1997 (1) 



Country 



United Kingdom. 

Canada 

Australia 

Netherlands. . . . 
New Zealand. . . . 

Belgium 

France 

Japan 

Ireland 

Other 

Total. . . 



Thousand 
pounds 

40,809 

29,297 

12,225 

6,329 

672 

1,270 

611 

522 

650 

3,144 



95,530 



Metric 
tons 



18,511 
13,289 



545 
871 
305 
576 
277 
237 
295 
426 



43,332 



Thousand 
dollars 

73,252 

42, 845 

18, 103 

10, 148 

881 

1, 826 

1, 085 

761 

966 

4,226 



Thousand 
pounds 



35, 

20, 

11, 

5, 

1, 

1, 



075 
763 
565 
479 
664 
612 
831 
589 
388 
654 



154,053 



15, 910 
9,418 



246 
939 
755 
731 
377 
267 
176 
204 



37,023 



Thousand 
dollars 

67,228 
29,277 
18,415 
10, 192 



140 
108 
139 
910 
668 
360 



135,437 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-exports) 
Source: --U. S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 



96 



FOREIGN TRADE 



EXPORTS 



FRESH AND FROZEN CRAB EXPORTS, 
BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION, 1996 AND 1997 (1) 



Country 



Japan 

Canada 

Thailand 

China 

Taiwan 

Hong Kong 

Mexico 

United Kingdom. 

Belgium 

Other 

Total. . . 



Thousand 
pounds 

35, 044 

8,702 

216 

1, 962 

117 

51 

79 

104 

7 

461 



45,742 



Metric 
tons 

15, 896 

3, 947 

98 

890 

53 

23 

36 

47 

3 

209 



21,202 



Thousand 
dollars 

137, 529 

15,535 

951 

5,849 

167 

284 

244 

528 

65 

1, 251 



Thousand 
pounds 

28, 955 

10,571 

897 

1,349 

421 

163 

123 

55 

49 

549 



162,403 



43,133 



Metric 
tons 

13, 134 

4,795 

407 

612 

191 

74 

56 

25 

22 

249 



25,555 



Thousand 
dollars 



82,230 
17,712 



658 
228 
722 
418 
401 
332 
313 
647 



108,661 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-exports) 
Source : --U.S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 




FRESH AND FROZEN CRABMEAT EXPORTS, 
BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION. 1996 AND 1997 (1) 



Country 



Japan 

Russian Federation... 

China 

Hong Kong 

Canada 

Philippines 

Switzerland 

Mexico 

South Korea 

Other 

Total 



Thousand 
pounds 

853 
547 
97 
236 
126 

2 

26 

198 

1, 021 



3,106 



Metric 
tons 

387 
248 

44 
107 

57 

1 

12 

90 

463 



1,405 



Thousand 
dollars 

2,636 
499 
130 
245 
397 

3 

86 

331 

1,767 



Thousand 
pounds 

1,497 

875 

183 

159 

150 

51 

15 

86 

15 

368 



5,054 



3,399 



Metric 
tons 

679 

397 

83 

72 

68 

23 

7 

39 

7 

167 



1,542 



Thousand 
dollars 



813 
206 
598 
459 
443 
200 
168 
149 
102 
680 



7,818 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-export 
Source :- -U.S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Censu 



s) . 



I 



FOREIGN TRADE 



EXPORTS 



97 



FISH AND MARINE ANIMAL OIL EXPORTS, 
BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION, 1996 AND 1997 (1) 



Country 



Thousand 
pounds 



Netherlands . . . . 

Canada 

Mexico 

South Korea . . . . 

China 

Hong Kong 

Japan 

Spain 

United Kingdom. 

Other 

Total . . . 



99, 
55, 
14, 



,416 
,904 
,888 
,719 
,003 
51 
,673 
, 864 

776 



187,294 



Metric 
tons 

45,095 

25,358 

6,753 

3, 955 

455 

23 

1,666 

1,299 



352 



84,956 



Thousand 
dollars 



16,248 
13,013 



,229 
,905 
631 
91 
657 
395 

254 



Thousand 
pounds 

116,249 
46, 806 
22,716 
10,452 



099 
018 
762 
643 
185 
325 



36,423 



215,255 



52, 730 

21,231 

10,304 

4,741 

2,313 

1,369 

3,067 

1,199 

84 

601 



97,639 



Thousand 
dollars 



26,420 
13,244 



131 
688 
068 
619 
251 
772 
108 
415 



53,715 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re-exports) 
Source : --U. S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 




FISH MEAL EXPORTS, BY COUNTRY OF DESTINATION, 1996 AND 1997 (1) 



(1) Figures reflect both domestic and foreign (re 
Source : --U.S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of the 



exports) 
Census . 



Country 


1996 


1997 1 




Thousand 


Metric 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Metric 


Thousand 




povnd? 


t<?np 


dpllars 


pounds 


tons 


dollars 


China 


24,486 
49,456 
31,274 


11,107 
22,433 
14,186 


7,653 

13,882 

7,224. 


73,318 
43,651 
39,169 


33,257 
19,800 
17,767 


13,995 
10,897 
10,463 




Canada 


Japan 


20,719 


9,398 


5,683 


22,123 


10,035 


6,108 


Hong Kong 


6,261 


2,840 


1,688 


10,373 


4,705 


2,421 


Philippines 


19,868 


9,012 


4,567 


7,474 


3,390 


2,386 


Thailand 


1,164 


528 


2,651 


494 


224 


2,190 




2,981 
30,203 


1,352 
13,700 


755 
8,828 


1,887 

5,615 

12,185 


856 
2,547 
5,527 


2,093 
1,721 
4,923 




Other 

Total 


186,412 


84,556 


52,931 


216,289 


98,108 


57,197m 





98 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



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SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



99 



U.S. SUPPLY OF EDIBLE AND INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1988-97 

(Round weight) 



Year 


Domestic commercial 
landings (1) 


Imports 
(2) 


Total 


1988 


Million 

7,192 
8,463 
9,404 
9,484 
9,637 
10,467 
10,461 
9,788 
9,565 
9,846 


49.2 
54.7 
57.5 
58.0 
59.8 
51.5 
54.2 
59.4 
58.1 
57.5 


Mi,lJ.i9n, 
pounds 

7,436 
7,022 
6,945 
6,879 
6,469 
9,867 
8,848 
6,696 
6,909 
'7,286 


Percent 

50.8 
45.3 
42.5 
42.0 
40.2 
48.5 
45.8 
40.6 
41.9 
42.5 


Million 
pounds 

14,628 
15,485 
16,349 
16,363 
16, 106 
20,334 
19,309 
16,484 
16,474 
17,132 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





(1) Preliminary. 

(2) Excludes imports of edible fishery products consumed in Puerto Rico, but includes landings 
of foreign- caught tuna in American Samoa. 

Note: --The weights of U.S. landings and imports represent the round (live) weight of al] 
except univalve and bivalve mollusks (conchs, clams, oysters, scallops, etc.) which are 
in weight of meats (excluding the shell) . 



LI items 
shown 



U.S. SUPPLY OF EDIBLE COMMERCIAL FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1988-97 
(Round weight) 



Domestic commercial 
landings (1) 



Imports 
(2) 



1988. 
1989. 
1990. 
1991. 
1992. 
1993. 
1994. 
1995. 
1996. 
1997. 



Million 
pounds 



4,588 
6,204 
7,041 
7,031 
7,618 
8,214 
7,936 
7,667 
7,474 
7,248 



Percent 



Million 
pounds 



43 .7 
50.6 
55.6 
54.0 
57.5 
59.4 
57.9 
56.4 
54.9 
52.8 



5,917 
6,064 
5,621 
5,989 
5,624 
5,607 
5,778 
5,917 
6,150 
6,491 



Percent 

56. 
49. 
44, 
46. 
42. 
40. 
42. 
43. 



45.1 
47.2 



Million 


pounds 




10 


505 


12 


268 


12 


662 


13 


020 


13 


242 


13 


821 


13 


714 


13 


584 


13 


624 


13 


739 



(1) Preliminary. 

(2) Excludes imports of edible fishery products consumed in Puerto Rico, but includes landi 
of foreign- caught tuna in American Samoa. 



U.S. SUPPLY OF INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1988-97 
(Round weight) 



Domestic commercial 
landings (1) 



Imports 



1988 

1989 

1990 

1991 

1992 

1993 

1994 

1995 

1996 

1997 

(1) Preliminary 



Million 
pounds 

2,6 

2, 

2, 

2, 

2, 

2, 

2, 

2, 

2, 

2, 



604 
259 
363 
453 
019 
253 
525 
121 
091 
898 



Percent 



Million 
pounds 



63.2 
70.2 
64.1 
73.4 
70.5 
34.6 
45.1 
73.1 
73.4 
78.5 



,519 
958 
324 
890 
845 
260 
070 
779 
759 
795 



36.8 
29.8 
35.9 
26.6 
29.5 
65.4 
54.9 
26.9 
26.6 
21.5 



Million 
pounds 

4, 
3, 
3, 
3, 
2, 
6, 
5, 
2, 
2, 
3, 



123 
217 
687 
343 
864 
513 
595 
900 
850 
693 



100 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



U.S. SUPPLY OF COMMERCIAL FINFISH AND SHELLFISH, 1996 AND 1997 



Item 


Domestic commercial 
landings 


Imports (1) 


Total 


1996 1 1997 


1996 


1997 


1996 


1997 


Edible fishery products: 




lion pounds - 

4,494 
1,656 


-round weiql 

4,608 
1,883 






6,204 
1,271 


5,969 
1,279 


10,698 
2, 927 


10,577 
3,162 


Shellfish 


Total 


7,475 


7,248 


6,150 


6,491 


13,625 


13,739 


Industrial fishery- 
products : 


2,069 
21 


2,428 
169 


759 
(3) 


795 
(3) 


2, 828 

21 


3,223 
169 


Shellfish 


Total 


2,090 


2,557 


755 


795 


2,849 


3,392 


Total : 


8,273 
1,292 


8,397 
1,448 


5,253 
1,656 


5,403 
1,883 


13,526 
2,948 


13,800 
3,331 


Shellfish 


Total 


9,565 


9,845 


6,909 


7,286 


16,474 


17,131 





See footnotes below. 



VALUE OF U.S. SUPPLY OF COMMERCIAL FINFISH AND SHELLFISH, 1996 AND 1997 



Item 


Domestic commercial 
landings 


Imports (1) 


Total 


1996 


1997 


1996 


1997 


1996 


1997 


Edible fishery products: 

Finfish 

Shellfish 


1,667 
1,688 


1,570 
1,733 


- -Million 

2,974 
3,756 








3,288 
4,458 


4,641 
5,444 


4,858 
6,191 


Total 


3,355 


3,303 


6,730 


7,746 


10,085 


11,049 


Industrial fishery- 
products : 


124 
8 


152 
11 


34 

(3) 


36 
(3) 


158 
8 


188 
11 


Shellfish 


Total 


132 


163 


(2) 34 


i2) 36 


166 


199 


Total : 


1,791 
1,696 


1,722 
1,744 


3,008 
3,756 


3,324 
4,458 


4,799 
5,452 


5,046 
6,202 


Shellfish 


Total 


3,487 


3,466 


6,764 


7,782 


10,251 


11,248 



(1) Excludes imports of edible fishery products consumed in Puerto Rico, but includes landings 

of foreign-caught tuna in American Samoa. 

(2) Includes only quantity and value of fish meal. 

(3) Not available. 



Note: --Value of domestic commercial landings is exvessel value. 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



101 



U.S. SUPPLY OF ALL FILLETS AND STEAKS, 1988-97 
(Edible weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
production (1) 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1988 


378,236 
371,082 
440,692 
472,668 
448,664 
420,169 
425,022 
385,293 
423,309 
397,525 


517,709 
517,620 
458,413 
440,018 
408,059 
440,354 
439,059 
477,483 
476,469 
514,805 


Thousand pounds 






100,301 
68,931 
51,599 
69,086 
52,247 
48,847 
43,252 
50,785 
74,368 
55,014 


795,644 
819,771 
847,506 
843,600 
804,476 
811,676 
820,829 
811,991 
825,410 
857,316 


895,945 
888,702 
899,105 
912,686 
856,723 
860,523 
864,081 
862,776 
899,778 
912,330 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





Includes fillets used to produce blocks. 




U.S. SUPPLY OF GROUNDFISH FILLETS AND STEAKS, 1988-97 
(Edible weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
production (1) 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 
(2) 


Total 
supply 


1988 


206,786 
211,498 
258,809 
264,323 
252,358 
233,755 
220,357 
216,699 
245,406 
219,538 


253,187 
265,001 
200,980 
202,409 
172,755 
186,516 
189,097 
184,845 
178,209 
176,125 


Thousand pounds 






14,417 
9,652 
6,944 
34,442 
17,507 
12,242 
17,639 
24,606 
41,691 
23,367 


445,556 
466, 847 
452,845 
432,290 
407,606 
408,029 
391, 815 
376,938 
381,924 
372,296 


459,973 
476,499 
459,789 
466,732 
425,113 
420,271 
409,454 
401,544 
423,615 
395,663 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


2994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





(1) Includes fillets used to produce blocks. Species include: cod, cusk, haddock, hake, 
pollock, and ocean perch. (2) Species include: cod 1988-96; pollock 1991-96. 



102 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



U.S. SUPPLY OF FRESH AND FROZEN TUNA, 1988-97 
(Round weight) 



1988. 
1989. 
1990. 
1991. 
1992. 
1993 . 
1994. 
1995. 
1996. 
1997. 



U.S. commercial landings (1) 



For 
canning 



Other 



Total 



Imports (2) 



For 
canning 



Other 



Thousand pounds 



486,640 
452,278 
391,954 
346,322 
435, 924 
426, 036 
401,732 
407,036 
364,652 
354, 074 



122,935 

87, 823 

119,955 

178,025 

137, 933 

62, 933 

157,695 

86, 956 

91,612 

102,567 



609,575 
540, 101 
511, 909 
524,347 
573,857 
488, 969 
559,427 
493, 992 
456,264 
456,641 



538,588 
625,738 
526,496 
579, 556 
482,677 
453, 046 
469, 514 
531,266 
567,266 
467,526 



18, 900 

38,564 

37,826 

50,290 

63, 524 

92, 965 

92,352 

105,304 

119,247 

105, 806 



557,488 
664,302 
564,322 
629, 846 
546,201 
546,011 
561,866 
636,570 
686,513 
573,332 



Exports 
Total 



(3) 

17,478 
19,773 
17,714 
20,011 
21,660 
28,512 
28, 869 
31,382 
24,092 



Total 
supply 



167,063 
186,925 
056,458 
136,479 
100, 047 
013,320 
092,781 
101,693 
111,395 
005,881 



(1) Includes a quantity of fish landed at other ports by U.S. -flag 

(2) Includes landings in American Samoa of foreign caught fish. 

(3) Not reported. 



vessels . 



Millions of Pounds 
1,400 



1,200 
1,000 



800 



600 



400 



200 



U.S. SUPPLY OF FRESH AND FROZEN TUNA 
(Round weight) 




1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 

[For canning B Other j 



1996 



1997 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



103 



U.S. SUPPLY OF CANNED SARDINES, 1988-97 
(Canned weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
pack 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1988 


18,611 
13,221 
13,240 
13,986 
17,437 
14,354 
15,560 
13,567 
17,672 
15,976 


53,359 
56,379 
56,963 
48,515 
36,511 
39,111 
43,942 
42,280 
40,926 
42,771 


-Thousand pound 

71, 970 
69,600 
70,203 
62,501 
53,948 
53,465 
59,502 
55,847 
58,598 
58,747 






8, 717 

9, 070 
9,048 

10,668 
12,690 
12,275 
11,010 
11,773 
12,207 
9,321 


63,253 
60,530 
61,155 
51, 833 
41,258 
41, 190 
48,492 
44, 074 
46,391 
49,426 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 



U.S. SUPPLY OF CANNED SALMON, 1988-97 
(Canned weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
pack 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1988 


88,419 
197,044 
196,383 
195,744 
149,453 
198,344 
206,841 
243,568 
197,163 
162,106 


3,528 

2,943 

1,378 

983 

974 

428 

1,093 

1,202 

2,266 

1,228 


-Thousand pounds 

91,947 
199,987 
197,761 
196,727 
150,427 
198,772 
207,934 
244,770 
199,429 
163,334 






32,993 
40,497 
49,546 
66,134 
77,895 
84,610 
90,915 
98,197 
95,530 
81,621 


58, 954 
159,490 
148,215 
130,593 

72,532 
114,162 
117,019 
146, 573 
103, 899 

81,713 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





U.S. SUPPLY OF CANNED TUNA, 1988-97 
(Canned weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
pack 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1988 


598,181 
686,267 
580,601 
592,786 
608,981 
618,743 
609,514 
666,581 
675,816 
627,032 


244,504 
348,212 
284,593 
351,744 
323,413 
224,419 
249,043 
215,365 
193,037 
212,171 


-Thousand pounds 

842,685 
1,034,479 
865,194 
944,530 
932,394 
843,162 
858,557 
881,946 
868,853 
839,203 






(1) 
6,495 
9,039 
11,310 
10, 141 
8,534 
8,391 
7,385 
9,866 
9,967 


842,685 
1,027,984 
856,155 
933,220 
922,253 
834,628 
850,166 
874,561 
858,987 
829,236 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995. 


1996 


1997 





104 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



U.S. SUPPLY OF KING CRAB, 1988-97 
(Round weight) 



Year 


U.S. commercial 
landings 


Imports 
(1) 


Total 


Exports 

(1) 


Total 
supply 


1988 


20,973 
26,391 
33,917 
28,140 
19,056 
24,732 
11,960 
14,673 
21,000 
18,027 


(2) 

5,150 

4,925 

7,087 

11,958 

7,395 

15,035 

18,360 

26,533 

39,666 


-Thousand pounds 

20,973 
31,541 
38,842 
35,227 
31,014 
32,127 
26,995 
33,033 
47,533 
57,693 






10,554 
(3) 13,196 
(3) 19,486 
15,320 
16,241 
24,372 
15,013 
11,847 
17,650 
12,516 


10,419 
18,345 
19,356 
19,907 
14,773 
7,755 
11,982 
21,186 
29,883 
45,177 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 



(1) Imports, exports, foreign exports converted to round (live) weight by using these 
conversion factors: frozen, 1.75; meat, 4.50; and canned, 5.33 (2) Not reported. 
(3) Estimated, based on available foreign import data. 



U.S. SUPPLY OF SNOW (TANNER) CRABS, 1988-97 
(Round weight) 



Year 


U.S. commercial 
landings 


Imports 
(1) 


Total 


Exports 
(2) 


Total 
supply 


1988 


146,326 
164,643 
213,395 
357,122 
350,039 
255,733 
159,574 
80,817 
67,867 
118,898 


6,765 
3,927 
10,772 
19,091 
18,882 
31,224 
27,446 
20,969 
28,336 
41,959 


-Thousand pounds 

153,091 
168, 570 
224,167 
376,213 
368,921 
286, 957 
187,020 
101,786 
96,203 
160,857 


122,741 

(3) 111,028 

(3) 187,069 

(3) 316,162 

281,214 

220,618 

147,006 

59,805 

50,509 

50,604 


30,350 
57,542 
37,098 
60,051 
87,707 
66,339 
40,014 
41,981 
45,694 
110,253 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





(1) Converted to round (live) weight by multiplying fresh and frozen by 1.50; meat, 4.50; 
and canned, 5.00. (2) Domestic merchandise converted to round (live) weight by 
multiplying frozen weight by 2.13 (belived to be mostly sections); meat, 4.50; and c 
Foreign exports converted using the same factors as imports. (3) Estimated, based 
available foreign import data. 



anned, 5. 
on 



U.S. SUPPLY OF CANNED CRABIVIEAT, 1988-97 
(Canned weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
pack 


Imports 


Total 


Export s 


Total 
supply 


1988 




1 


359 
504 
695 
77 
99 
70 
17 
65 
93 
83 


7,720 

8,280 

8,563 

11,385 

9,577 

9,817 

9,852 

12,441 

12,773 

15, 871 


8,079 

8,784 

9,258 

11,462 

9,676 

9,887 

9,869 

12,506 

15,866 

15,954 


250 
930 
434 
525 
789 
668 
511 
276 
337 
608 


7,829 

7,854 

8,824 

10,937 

8,887 

9,219 

9,358 

12,230 

12, 529 

15,346 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



105 



U.S. SUPPLY OF AMERICAN L0BSTERS,1 988-97 
(Round weight) 



Year 


U.S. commercial 
landings 


Imports 
(1) 


Total 


Exports 
(2) 


Total 
supply 


1988 


48,643 
52,926 
61,017 
63,337 
55,841 
56,513 
66,416 
66,406 
71,641 
83, 921 


72,638 
42,530 
49,592 
65,381 
59,335 
55,570 
65,949 
62,923 
65,379 
73,033 


Thousand pounds 






(3) 
10,310 
15,274 
21,485 
20,332 
20,354 
31,646 
35,587 
39,919 
45,262 


121,281 
85,146 
95,335 

107,233 
94,844 
91,729 

100,719 
93,742 
97,101 

111,692 


121,281 
95,456 
110,609 
128,718 
115,176 
112,083 
132,365 
129,329 
137,020 
156,954 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





(1) Only imports from Canada and St. Pierre and Miquelon are considered American lobster and 
were converted to round (live) by using these conversion factors: 1.00, Whole; 4.50, meat; 
and 4.64, canned. (2) Domestic exports converted to live weight by 1.00, whole; 4.00, meat; 
and 4.50, canned. Foreign exports converted using import factors. (3) Not reported. 




U.S. SUPPLY OF SPINY L0BSTERS,1 988-97 
(Round weight) 



Year 


U.S. commercial 
landings 


Imports 
(1) 


Total 


Exports 
(2) 


Total 
supply 


1988 


7,166 
8,125 
7,120 
7,096 
4,872 
6,076 
8,104 
7,123 
8,308 
7,240 


132,071 
87,793 
88,426 
81,332 
77,848 
70,884 
68,787 
86,900 
75,595 
74,120 


Thousand pounds 






(3) 
6,373 
6,948 
3,388 
2,001 
1,306 
1,304 
5,035 
3,033 
5,842 


139,237 
89,545 
88,598 
85,040 
80,719 
75,654 
75,587 
88, 988 
80,870 
75,518 


139,237 
95,918 
95,546 
88,428 
82,720 
76,960 
76,891 
94,023 
83,903 
81,360 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





(1) Imports were converted to round (live) weight by using these conversion factors: 
whole; 3.00, tails; 4.35, other; and 4.50 canned. (2) Domestic exports converted to 
weight by using: 1.00, whole; 3.00, tails, 4.00, other; 4.50, canned. Foreign exports 
using import factors. (3) Not reported. 



1.00, 
round 
conver 



106 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



U.S. SUPPLY OF CLAMS, 1988-97 
(Meat weight) 



Year 


U.S. commercial 
landings (1) 


Imports 
(2) 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1988 


131, 740 
138, 166 
139,198 
134,243 
142,449 
147,752 
131,427 
134,224 
123,239 
114,180 


14,872 
13,254 
15,830 
12,291 
14,262 
9,579 
15,507 
12,645 
14,340 
13,184 


Thousand pounds 

146,612 
151,420 
155,028 
146,534 
156,711 
157,331 
146,934 
146,869 
137,579 
127,364 






1,458 
1,863 
2, 961 
2,948 
1,662 
1,809 
2,617 
2,853 
3,448 
3,651 


145,154 
149,557 
152,067 
143,586 
155,049 
155,522 
144,317 
144,016 
134,131 
123,713 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 



(1) For specific breakout see table on page 1. 

(2) Imports and exports were converted to meat weight by using these conversion factors:0.40 
in shell or shucked; 0.30, canned chowder and juice; and 0.93, other. 



U.S. SUPPLY OF OYSTERS, 1988-97 
(Meat weight) 



Year 


U.S. commercial 
landings 


Imports 
(1) 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1988 


31,892 
29,250 
29,193 
31,859 
36,156 
33,575 
38,086 
40,380 
38,007 
39,652 


46,414 
37,662 
27,546 
30,547 
26,529 
28,244 
24,694 
24,200 
21,708 
20,533 


Thousand pounds 

78,306 
66,912 
56, 739 
62,406 
62,685 
61,819 
62,780 
64,580 
59,715 
60,185 


(2) 

1,090 
1,004 
739 
797 
1,131 
1,988 
1,908 
1,648 
2,191 


78,306 
65,822 
55,735 
61,667 
61, 888 
60,688 
60,792 
62,672 
58,067 
57,994 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





(1) Imports and exports were converted to meat weight by using these conversion fact 
0.93, canned; 3.12, canned smoked; and 0.75, other. (2) Not reported. 



U.S. SUPPLY OF SCALLOPS, 1988-97 
(Meat weight) 



Year 


U.S. commercial 
landings (1) 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1988 


42,994 
40,611 
41,591 
39,740 
33,884 
18,638 
25,469 
19,526 
18,197 
15,474 


32,039 
40,874 
39,839 
29,528 
38,682 
51,973 
56,676 
48,331 
58,686 
60,146 


Thousand pounds 

75,033 
81,485 
81,430 
69,268 
72,566 
70,611 
82,145 
67,857 
76,883 
75,620 






1,369 
2,498 
7,099 
7,083 
3,589 
4,147 
5,990 
5,926 
6,191 
9,861 


73,664 
78,987 
74,331 
62,185 
68,977 
66,464 
76,155 
61,931 
70,692 
65,759 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





Lfic breakout see table on page 1. 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



107 



U.S. SUPPLY OF ALL FORMS OF SHRIMP, 1988-97 
(Heads-off weight) 



Year 


U.S. commercial 
landings (1) 


Imports 
(2) 


Total 


Exports 
(3) 


Total 
supply 


1988 


203,350 
215,825 
213,899 
198,115 
207,086 
180,687 
174, 969 
190,208 
195, 902 
179,084 


598,210 
563,523 
579,427 
632,775 
694,254 
708,683 
749,993 
719,463 
720,852 
810,696 


Thousand pounds 

801,560 
779,348 
793,326 
830,890 
901,340 
889,370 
924,962 
909,671 
916,754 
989,780 






34,784 
36,056 
59,683 
87,186 
81,604 
81,447 
77,755 
77,677 
75,130 
66,674 


766,776 
743,292 
733,643 
743,704 
819,736 
807,923 
847,207 
831, 994 
841,624 
923,106 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





(1) Commercial landings were converted to heads-off weight by using these conversion 
South Atlantic and Gulf, 0.629; and New England, Pacific and other, 0.57. 



(2) Imports were converted to heads-off weight by using these conversion factors : breaded, . 63 
shell-on, 1.00; peeled raw, 1.28; canned, 2.52; and other, 2.40. 

(3) Exports were converted to heads-off weight by using these conversion factors : domestic 
fresh and frozen, 1.18; canned, 2.02; other, 2.40; foreign- -fresh and frozen, 1.00; 
canned, 2. 52; and other, 2.40. 




U.S. SUPPLY OF CANNED SHRIMP, 1988-97 
(Canned weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
pack 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1988 


4,476 
2,623 
710 
632 
640 
658 
463 
912 
819 
1,168 


14,138 
11,315 
9,735 
9,361 
9,273 
8, 170 
6,314 
6,570 
3,563 
3,620 


Thousand pounds 

18,614 
13,93 8 
10,445 
9,993 
9,913 
8,828 
6,777 
7,482 
4,382 
4,788 






2,187 
2,128 
2,670 
2,352 
1,931 
2,557 
1,841 
3,250 
2,665 
1,470 


16,427 
11,810 
7,775 
7,641 
7,982 
6,271 
4,936 
4,232 
1,717 
3,318 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





108 



SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



U.S. SUPPLY OF FISH MEAL AND SOLUBLES, 1988-97 
(Product weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
production (1) 


Imports 
(2) 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply- 


1988 


755,520 
734, 736 
670,328 
697,520 
691,016 
814,196 
880,852 
711,996 
684,121 
796,669 


265,310 
171,112 
239,426 
158,916 
150,911 
760,664 
548,288 
139,101 
135,561 
142,049 


Thousand Dounds 






153,946 
107,350 
141,888 
206,320 
258,511 
212,859 
159,937 
176,981 
186,412 
216,289 


see, 884 
798,498 
767, 866 
650,116 
583,416 
1,362,001 
1,269,203 
674,116 
633,270 
722,429 


1,020,830 
905,848 
909,754 
856,436 
841,927 
1,574,860 
1,429,140 
851,097 
819,682 
938,718 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 

1997 





(1) Includes shellfish meal production plus the production of U.S. 
include imports of fish solubles. 



(2) Data do n 



Note: --Wet weight of solubles has been converted to dry weight by reducing its poundage by 
one-half . 



U.S. SUPPLY OF FISH MEAL, 1988-97 
(Product weight) 



Year 


U.S. 
production (1) 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1988 


643,796 
618,382 
577,498 
612,716 
644,512 
750,744 
807,833 
667,240 
643,124 
724,668 


265,310 
171,112 
239,426 
158,916 
150, 911 
760,664 
548,288 
139,101 
135,561 
142,049 


Thousand Dounds 


153,946 
107,350 
141, 888 
206,320 
258,511 
212,859 
159,937 
176,981 
186,412 
216,289 


755,160 
682,144 
675,036 
565,312 
536,912 
1,298,549 
1,196,184 
629,360 
592,273 
650,428 


909,106 
789,494 
816,924 
771,632 
795,423 
1,511,408 
1,356,121 
806,341 
778,685 
866,717 


1989 


1990 


1991 .... 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





(1) Includes shellfish meal. 



U.S. SUPPLY OF FISH OILS, 1988-97 



Year 


U.S. 
production 


Imports 


Total 


Exports 


Total 
supply 


1988 




. _. ... 1 








224,733 
225,478 
281,949 
267,345 
184,725 
293,452 
291,189 
241, 941 
248,399 
283,379 


27,667 
25,449 
36, 702 
21, 828 
23,772 
26,052 
40,642 
23,913 
35,622 
25,622 


252,400 
250,927 
318,651 
289,173 
208,497 
319,504 
331,831 
265,854 
284,021 
309,001 


150,002 
198,009 
236,589 
254,525 
177,444 
184,488 
242,788 
260,394 
187,294 
215,255 


102,398 
52, 918 
82,062 
34,648 
31,053 

135,016 

89,043 

5,460 

96,727 

93,746 


1989 


1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 





SUPPLY OF FISHERY PRODUCTS 



109 




N. 




o> 




o> 




^■ 




(O 




o> 




o> 




"*" 




u> 




a> 




o> 




^— 






^^^^ 


Tt 


tf> 


a> 


r 


o> 


o 


T- 


a 




E 








B 


n 


(0 




c 








■D 




C 




10 




_1 




75 


o> 






fci 




0) 




E 




E 


^~ 


o 


O) 


O 


^ 


m 


o 




o> 




a> 




'" 




o> 




00 




o> 




'" 




00 




00 




o> 





110 



PER CAPITA 



U.S. CONSUMPTION 



Annual per capita consumption of seafood products represents the pounds of edible meat 
consumed from domestically-caught and imported fish and shellfish adjusted for beginning and 
ending inventories, and exports, divided by the civilian population of the United States as 
of July 1 of each year. 

U.S. ANNUAL PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION OF COMMERCIAL FISH AND SHELLFISH, 1909-97 



Civilian 

resident 

population 

July 1 (1) 



Per capita consumption 



Million 
persons 



Fresh and 
frozen (2) 



Canned 
(3) 



Cured 
(4) 



Total 



1909 (5) 

1910 

1911. . . . 

1912. . . . 

1913. . . . 

1914. . . . 

1915. . . . 

1916. . . . 

1917. . . . 

1918. . . . 

1919. . . . 

1920 

1921. . . . 

1922. . . . 

1923 . . . . 

1924 . . . . 

1925. . . . 

1926. . . . 

1927. . . . 

1928. . . . 

1929. . . . 

1930 

1931. . . . 

1932. . . . 
1933 . . . . 

1934. . . . 

1935. . . . 

1936. . . . 

1937. . . . 

1938. . . . 

1939. . . . 

1940 

1941. . . . 

1942. . . . 

1943 . . . . 

1944 . . . . 

1945. . . . 

1946. . . . 

1947. . . . 

1948. . . . 

1949. . . . 

1950 

1951. . . . 

1952. . . . 

1953 . . . . 

1954 . . . . 
1955. . . . 
1956 . . . . 

1957. . . . 

1958. . . . 

1959. . . . 



90.5 

92.2 
93 .9 
95.3 
97.2 
99.1 



100. 
102. 
103. 
103. 
104. 



106.5 
108.5 
110.0 
111.9 
114.1 
115.8 
117.4 
119.0 
120.5 
121.8 

122.9 

123 .9 

124 .7 
125.4 
126. 
127. 
127. 
128. 
129. 
130. 



132 
132 
131 
128 
127 
128 
138 
143 , 
145 
148, 



150.8 

151.6 

153 .9 

156.6 

159. 

163 . 

166, 

169. 

172. 

175. 



-Pounds, edible meat- 



4.3 

4.5 
4.8 
5.0 
5.3 



.6 
.8 
.0 
,2 
.4 
.4 

,3 
.2 
,1 
,0 
,1 
,3 
,6 
,0 
.1 
9 

,8 
9 
3 
2 
3 
1 
2 
6 
2 
3 

7 
3 
2 
5 
5 
6.6 
5.9 
5.8 
6.0 
5.8 



2.7 

2.8 
2.8 
2.9 
2.9 
3 
2.4 
2 .2 
2 .0 
2 .0 
2.8 



3 .9 

3 .4 
3 .2 
3 .4 



3 .9 

4 .2 
4.7 

"5.8 
5.3 
4 .8 
4 .7 

4 .6 
4 .2 

2 .9 
1.8 
2.6 
2.6 
4 .2 

3 .8 

4 .4 
4.5 



3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

2.8 

2 .7 

2 .5 

2.4 

2.3 

2.1 
2.0 
1.8 
1.7 
1.6 



1.4 
1.3 

1.1 
1.1 

1.0 
0.7 
0.7 
0.6 
0.7 
0.7 
0.7 
0.9 
0.8 
0.7 



11. 
11. 
11. 
11. 
8. 
11. 
11. 
10. 
10. 
11. 

11. 

10. 

11. 

10. 

11. 

11. 

11.4 

12.2 

12.1 

11.9 

10.2 

8.8 

8.4 

8.7 

9.2 

10.5 

11.7 

11.8 

10.8 

10.7 

11.0 
11.2 



7. 
8. 
9. 

10. 
10. 

11. 
10. 



11.8 
11.2 



11 



11, 

11. 

10. 

10. 

10. 

10.6 

10.9 



See notes at end of table. 



(Continued) 



PER CAPITA 



111 



U.S. CONSUMPTION 



U.S. ANNUAL PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION OF COMMERCIAL FISH AND SHELLFISH, 1909-97 - Continued 



Civilian 

resident 

population 

July 1 (1) 



Million 
persons 



Per capita consumption 



Fresh and 
frozen (2) 



Canned 
(3) 



Cured 
(4) 



1960. 

1961. 
1962. 
1963 . 
1964. 
1965. 
1966. 
1967. 
1968. 
1969. 

1970. 

1971. 
1972. 
1973 . 
1974. 
1975. 
1976. 
1977. 
1978. 
1979. 

1980. 

1981. 
1982. 
1983 . 
1984. 
1985. 
1986. 
1987. 
1988. 
1989. 

1990. 

1991. 
1992. 
1993 . 
1994. 
1995. 
1996. 
1997. 



78.1 
81.1 
83 .7 
86.5 
89.1 
1.6 
93.4 
95.3 
97.1 
99.1 



201.9 
204.9 
207.5 
209.6 
211.6 
213 .8 
215.9 
218.1 
220.5 
223 .0 



5.6 
7.8 
0.0 
2.1 
4.1 
6.2 
8.4 
0.6 
2.8 
5.1 



250 
253 
256, 
259, 
261, 
264, 



5.7 
5.9 

5.8 
5.8 
5.9 



5 
8.2 
7.7 
8.1 
7.8 

7.9 

7.8 

7.9 

8.4 

9.0 

9.8 

9.8 

*10.7 

10.0 

10.2 



9. 

9. 

9. 
10 
10 
10, 
10.0 

9.9 



-Pounds, edible meat- 



4 .0 
4 .3 
4 .3 
4.4 
4.1 
4.3 
4.3 
4.3 
4.3 
4 .2 



4.3 

4.6 

4 .3 

4.7 

4 . 

5. 

5. 

5. 

4 . 

5. 



5.1 
4 .9 
4 .6 



0.4 
0.5 
0.5 
0.4 
0.5 
0.4 
0.5 
0.4 
0.3 
0.4 

0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 

0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 
0.3 



10.3 
10.7 
10.6 
10.7 
10.5 
10.8 
10.9 
10.6 
11.0 
11.2 



11.8 
11.5 
12.5 
12.8 
12.1 

12 .2 
12.9 
12.7 

13 .4 
13 .0 



12.5 
12.7 
12.5 

13 .4 

14 .2 
15.1 
15.5 

1^16.2 
15.2 
15.6 



15. 
14. 
14 . 
15. 
15. 



15.0 
14.8 
14.6 



TT) Resident population for 1909 to 1929 and civilian resident population for 1930 to dat 

(2) Fresh and frozen fish consumption from 1910 to 1928 is estimated. Beginning in 1973, 
data include consumption of artificially cultivated catfish. Domestic landings used in 
calculating consumption are preliminary after 1977. 

(3) Canned fish consumption for 1911 to 1920 is estimated. Beginning in 1921, it is based 
on production reports, packer stocks, and foreign trade statistics for individual years. 

(4) Cured fish consumption for 1910 to 1928 is estimated. 

(5) Data for 1909 estimate based on the 1908 census and foreign trade data. 
♦Record. 



112 



PER CAPITA 



U.S. CONSUMPTION 





U.S. ANNUAL PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION OF CANNED FISHERY PRODUCTS, 1977-97 


Year 


Salmon | Sardines | Tuna | Shellfish | Other 


Total 




Pounds 


- 


1977 


0.5 


0.3 


2.8 


0.6 


0.4 


4.6 


1978 


0.6 


0.3 


3.3 


0.5 


0.3 


5.0 


1979 


0.5 


0.3 


3.2 


0.5 


0.3 


4-. 8 


1980 


0.5 


0.3 


3 .0 


0.4 


0.1 


4.3 


1981 


0.5 


0.4 


3.0 


0.4 


0.3 


4.6 


1982 


0.5 


0.3 


2.8 


0.4 


0.3 


4.3 


1983 


0.5 


0.2 


3.2 


0.4 


0.4 


4 .7 


1984 


0.6 


0.2 


3.2 


0.4 


0.5 


4.9 


1985 


0.5 


0.3 


3.3 


0.5 


0.4 


5.0 


1986 


0.5 


0.3 


3.6 


0.5 


0.5 


5.4 


1987 


0.4 


0.3 


3 .5 


0.5 


0.5 


5.2 


1988 


0.3 


0.3 


3.6 


0.4 


0.3 


4.9 


1989 


0.3 


0.3 


3.9 


0.4 


0.2 


5.1 


1990 


0.4 


0.3 


3.7 


0.3 


0.4 


5.1 


1991 


0.5 


0.2 


3.6 


0.4 


0.2 


4.9 


1992 


0.5 


0.2 


3.5 


0.3 


0.1 


4.6 


1993 


0.4 


0.2 


3.5 


0.3 


0.1 


4.5 


1994 


0.4 


0.2 


3.3 


0.3 


0.3 


4.5 


1995 


0.5 


0.2 


3.4 


0.3 


0.3 


4.7 


199G 


0.5 


0.2 


3.2 


0.3 


0.3 


4.5 


1997 


0.4 


0.2 


3.1 


0.3 


0.4 


4 .4 



-Domestic landings data used in calculating these data are preliminary after 1977. 



U.S. ANNUAL PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION OF CERTAIN FISHERY ITEMS, 1977-97 





Fillets 




Sticks 




Shrimp 




Year 


and 




and 




all 






steaks (1) 




portions 




preparation 


• 
























1977 




2.5 




2.0 




1.6 


1978 




2.7 




2.2 




1.5 


1979 




2.7 




*2.2 




1.3 


1980 




2.4 




2.0 




1.4 


1981 




2.4 




1.8 




1.5 


1982 




2.5 




1.7 




1.5 


1983 




2.7 




1.8 




1.7 


1984 




3.0 




1.8 




1.9 


1985 




3.2 




1.8 




2.0 


1986 




3 .4 




1.8 




2.2 


1987 




*3.6 




1.7 




2.4 


1988 




3.2 




1.5 




2.4 


1989 




3.1 




1.5 




2.3 


1990 




3.1 




1.5 




2.2 


1991 




3.0 




1.2 




2.4 


1992 




2.9 




0.9 




2.5 


1993 




2.9 




1.0 




2.5 


1994 




3.1 




0.9 




2.6 


1995 




2.9 




1.2 




2.5 


1996 




3.0 




1.0 




2.5 


1997 




3.0 




1.0 




*2.7 



(1) Data include groundfish and other species. Data do not include blocks, but fillets could 
be made into blocks from which sticks and portions could be produced. 

(2) Product weight of fillets and steaks and sticks and portions, edible (meat) weight of shrimp. 
♦Record. 



Note :- -Domestic landings data used in calculating tl.ese data are preliminary after 1977. 



PER CAPITA 
U.S. USE 



113 



Per capita use of commercial fish and shellfish is based on the supply of fishery products, 
both edible and nonedible (industrial), on a round weight equivalent basis, without 
considering the beginning or ending stocks, defense purchases, or exports. 

Per capita use figures are not comparable with per capita consumption data. Per capita 
consumption figures represent edible (for human use) meat weight consumption rather than round 
weight consumption. In addition, per capita consumption includes allowances for beginning and 
ending stocks and exports, whereas the use does not include such allowances. 

Per capita use is derived by using total population including U.S. Armed Forces overseas. 
The per capita consumption is derived by using civilian resident population. 



U.S ANNUAL PER CAPITA USE OF COMMERCIAL FISH AND SHELLFISH, 1960-97 (1) 



Total population 

including armed 

forces overseas 

July 1 



u 


.S. 


supply 


Million 


pounds 


8 


223 


9 


570 


10 


408 


11 


434 


12 


031 


10 


535 


12 


469 


13 


991 


17 


381 


11 


847 


11 


474 


11 


804 


13 


849 


10 


378 


9 


875 


10 


164 


11 


593 


10 


652 


11 


509 


11 


831 


11 


357 


11 


353 


12 


Oil 


12 


352 


12 


552 


15 


150 


14 


368 


15 


744 


14 


628 


15 


485 


16 


349 


IS 


363 


IS 


106 


20 


334 


19 


309 


IS 


484 


16 


474 


17 


131 



Commercial 
landings 



Imports 



1960. 

1961. 
1962. 
1963 . 
1964. 
1965. 
1966. 
1967. 
1968. 
1969. 

1970. 

1971. 
1972. 
1973 . 
1974. 
1975. 
1976. 
1977. 
1978. 
1979. 

1980. 

1981. 

198 

198 

198 

198 

198 

198 

198 

198 



1990. 

1991. 
1992. 
1993 . 
1994. 
1995. 
1996. 
1997. 



Million 
persons 



80.7 
83 .7 
86.5 
89.2 
91.9 
94.3 
96.6 
98.7 
00.7 
02.7 



205.1 
207.7 
209.9 
211.9 
213 .9 
216.0 
218.0 
220.2 
222.6 
225.1 



7.7 
0.0 



249. 
252. 
255. 
258. 
260. 
263. 
265. 
268. 



27. 
28. 
28. 
25. 
23 . 
24. 
22. 
20. 
20. 
21. 

24. 

24. 

22. 

22. 

23 . 

22. 

24. 

23. 

27.1 

27.9 

28.5 
25.0 
27.4 
27.5 
27.3 
26.2 
25.1 
28.4 
29.3 
34.2 



37.6 
37.5 
37.7 
40.6 
40.1 
37.2 
36.1 
36. 7 



18.2 
23 .9 
27.1 
34.8 
39.0 
29.6 
41.2 
50.0 
65.9 
37.0 

31.9 
32.7 



43 
26 
23 
24 
28 
24 
24 
24 



21.4 
23 .4 
24.3 
25.2 
25.8 
37.3 
34.6 
36.4 
30.4 
28.4 



27. 
27. 
25. 
38. 
34. 
25. 
26. 
27. 



45.5 
52.1 
55.8 
60.4 
62.7 
54 .2 
63 .4 
70.4 
86.6 
58.4 

55.9 
56.8 
66.0 
49.0 
46.2 
47.1 
53 .2 
48.3 
51.7 
52.6 

49.9 
49.4 
51.7 
52.7 
53 .1 

63 .5 
59.7 

64 .8 
59.7 
62.6 

65.4 
64.8 
63 .0 
78.8 
74.1 
62.7 
62.1 
63.9 



(1) Data include U.S. commercial landings and imports of both edible and nonedible (industria 
fishery products on a round weight basis. "Total supply" is not adjusted for beginning and 
ending stocks, defense purchases, or exports. 



114 



PER CAPITA 



WORLD CONSUMPTION 

ANNUAL PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION OF FISH AND SHELLFISH FOR HUMAN FOOD, 

BY REGION AND COUNTRY, 1993-95 AVERAGE 



Estimated live wei 
equivalent 



gEF 



Worth America: 



Region 

and 
Country 



Canada 

Greenland 

St. Pierre and 

Miquelon 

United States . . 



Caribbean : 



Antigua 

Aruba 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

Cayman Islands 

Cuba 

Dominica 

Dominican Republic. 

Grenada 

Guadeloupe 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Martinique 

Netherland Antilles. 

Saint Lucia 

St . Vincent 

Trinidad-Tobago 

Turks & Caicos 



Latin America: 



Argentina 

Belize 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Costa Rica . . . . 

Ecuador 

El Salvador. . . 
French Guiana. 

Guatemala 

Guyana 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Suriname 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 



Estimated live weight 
equivalent 



Kilograms 



Europe : 



Albania 

Armenia 

Austria 

Azerbaijan 

Belarus 

Belgium and Luxembourg 
Bosnia-Hercegovina . . 



23 .2 
82.0 



31.2 
21.9 



28.2 
9.1 
23 .7 
27.1 
38.8 
31.4 
11.4 
27.0 
7.2 
40.1 
41.5 
2.3 
16 
48 
21 
21 
16 



.1 
.4 
.4 
.4 
.6 
8.3 
35.8 



10.1 
6.8 
1.5 
6.4 

28.4 
3 .9 
6.0 
7.2 
2.3 



Pounds 



2 
8.2 

17.6 



51.1 
180.8 



68.8 
48.3 



62.2 
20.1 
52.2 

59.7 
85.5 
69.2 
25.1 
59.5 
15.9 
88.4 



91. 
5. 
35. 
106. 
47. 
47. 
36, 
18, 



22.3 
15.0 

3.3 
14.1 
62.6 

8.6 
13.2 
15 

5 
74 

2 
92 

3 
24 

3 



9 
1 
3 
4 
8 
3 
3 
1 

36.2 
8.4 
52.5 
42.3 
18.1 
38.8 



2.0 
2.9 

22.9 
4.9 
2.4 

42.3 
2.6 



Region 

and 
Country 



Europe - Continued: 



Bulgaria 

Croatia 

Czech Republic. 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Faeroe Island. . 

Finland 

France 

Georgia 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Kazakhstan 

Kyrgyzstan 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Macedonia 

Malta 

Moldova 

Netherlands ... 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal 



Romania . 

Russian Federation. 

Slovakia 

Slovenia 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Taj ikistan 

Turkmenistan 

Ukraine 

United Kingdom 

Uzbekistan 

Yugoslavia 



Near East: 



Afghanistan 

Bahrain 

Cyprus 

Egypt 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Jordan 

Kuwait 

Lebanon 

Libya 

Oman 

Qatar 

Saudi Arabia 

Sudan 

Syria 

Turkey 

United Arab Emirates. 
Yemen Republic 



Kilograms 



2.8 

2.5 

4.8 
20.0 
33,9 
86.4 
33 .0 
27.1 

2.1 
12.7 
25.0 

4.0 
91.2 
19.2 
21.6 

2.7 

0.1 
36.6 
20.1 

2.9 
22.1 

2.6 
14.0 
47.5 
14.2 
58.8 

1.8 
14.6 

6.6 



5.7 
42.7 
28.5 
13 .1 

0.3 

3 .6 

4 .4 
19.1 

0.8 
0.7 



0.1 

16.8 

18.2 

7.3 

5.2 

0.9 

19.8 

3 .7 



11 



6, 

22, 

18, 
6, 
1.7 
0.8 
8.4 

24 .5 
6.1 



See note at end of table. 



(Continued on next page) 



PER CAPITA 



115 



WORLD CONSUMPTION 

ANNUAL PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION OF FISH AND SHELLFISH FOR HUMAN FOOD, 

BY REGION AND COUNTRY, 1993-95 AVERAGE 



Estimated live weight 
equivalent 



Region 

and 
Country 



Estimated live weight 
equivalent 



Region 

and 
Country 



Kilograms 



Pounds 



Kilograms 



Pounds 



Bangladesh. 

Brunei 

Burma 

Cambodia. . . 

China 

Hong Kong . . 

India 

Indonesia. . 

Japan 

Laos 

Macao 

Maldives . . . 
Malaysia . . . 
Mongolia. . . 

Nepal 

North Korea 
Pakistan. . . 
Philippines 
Singapore . . 
South Korea 
Sri Lanka . . 

Taiwan 

Thailand. . . 
Vietnam. . . . 



Algeria 

Angola 

Benin 

Botswana 

Burkina 

Burundi 

Cameroon 

Cape Verde 

Central African Rep 

Chad 

Comoros 

Congo (Brazzaville) 
Congo (Kinshasa) . . . 

Dj ibouti 

Equatorial Guinea.. 

Eritrea 

Ethiopia 

Gabon 

Gambia 

Ghana 

Guinea 

Guinea-Bissau 



9.1 
26.5 
15.9 

8.5 
19.1 
56.8 

4.4 
17.1 
69.9 

6.6 

38.1 

139.8 

54.5 

0.7 

0.8 
46.0 

2.1 
33.8 
31.8 
50.7 
18.9 
38.2 
25.9 



13.4 



4.2 

.6 

.6 

.6 

.3 

.7 

.9 

4 

4 

3 



17 

4 

6 

22.7 
25.9 

6.7 

1.8 
22.8 

0.8 


37 
17 
21 

9 

5 



20.1 
58.4 
35.1 
18.7 
42.1 

125.2 

9.7 

37.7 

154, 
14 
84 

308 
60. 
1. 
1.8 

101.4 

4.6 

74.5 

70.1 

111.8 
41.7 
84.2 
57.1 
29.5 



9.3 
19.0 
23.4 
12.3 

2.9 

8.2 
19.6 
38.4 

9.7 
13 .9 
50.0 
57.1 
14.8 

4.0 
50.3 

1.8 

0.2 
81.6 
39.5 
46.5 
21.8 
11.0 



Africa - Continued: 

Ivory Coast 

Kenya 

Lesotho 

Liberia 

Madagascar 

Malawi 

Mali 

Mauritania 

Mauritius 

Morocco 

Mozambique 

Namibia 

Niger 

Nigeria 

Reunion 

Rwanda 

Sao Tome 

Senegal 

Seychelles 

Sierra Leone 

Somalia 

South Africa 

St. Helena , 

Swaziland 

Tanzania 

Togo , 

Tunisia 

Uganda 

Zambia , 

Zimbabwe , 



Oceania: 

Australia 

Cook Island 

Fiji 

French Polynesia 

Kiribati 

New Caledonia. . . 

New Zealand 

Papua New Guinea 
Solomon Islands. 

Tonga 

Vanuatu 

Western Samoa. . . 

World 



12.2 
5.9 
2.7 
4 .5 
6.5 
6.3 
8.4 
17.4 
27.1 
8.1 



1 
11 



5 
27 


23 

27.8 
59.2 
14.9 

1.3 

6.8 
69.7 

0.2 
10.7 
12.0 

9.0 
10.2 

9.0 

3.2 



19.2 
61.6 
33.4 
37.6 
73.3 
19.9 
22.2 
13 .2 
33.5 
25.8 
24.8 
45.7 



14.5 



26.9 
13 .0 

6.0 

9 
14 
13 
18 
38 
59 
17 



24. 

1. 
12.8 
60.2 

1.5 

52.0 

61.3 

130.5 

32.8 

2. 

15. 

153. 

0. 
23. 
26. 
19.8 
22.5 
19.8 

7.1 



42.3 
135.8 

73 .6 

82.9 
161.6 

43. 

48. 

29. 

73. 

56. 

54. 



.9 
.9 
.1 
.9 
.9 
.7 
100.8 



Note: --Data for most countries are tentative. Aquatic plants are included where applicable. 
Source: --Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) 



116 



PRICES 



The Exvessel Price table is an index of 
changes in the relative dockside value of fish and 
shellfish sold by fishing vessels. The table indexes the 
average annual exvessel value (price per pound) 
received for each species or group to the average price 
per pound received for the same species or group in 
the base year 1 982. 

The exvessel price for each year v\^as obtained 
by dividing total value for each species or group by its 
total quantity as reported in the U. S. commercial 
landings tables on pages 1 thru 4. The index for each 
species or group was obtained by multiplying the 
current annual price by the total quantity caught in 



1982 (the base year). That number was then divided 
by the 1982 value to obtain the final index: 



(100 X Current price X 1982 quantity) = Index 
1982 Annual value 

Each index number measures price changes 
from the 1982 reference period when the index 
equaled 100. A species of fish that sold for $0.75 a 
pound in 1986 and a $1.00 a pound in 1982 would 
have an index of 75 in 1986. In 1997, if the price of 
the same species increased to $1.07, the index in 1997 
would be 107. 



EXVESSEL PRICE INDEX, 1991-1997 
BASE YEAR 1982 = 100 



70 



-10 




1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 



1997 



YEAR 



□ Edible Finfish ■ Edible Shellfish E9 Industrial Fish 



PRICES 



117 



INDEXES OF EXVESSEL PRICES FOR FISH AND SHELLFISH, BY YEARS, 1991-97 

(1982=100) 



Species 


1991 (1) 


1992 (1) 


1993 


1994 


1995 


1996 


1997 


Groundfish, et al : 
















Cod 


106 


105 


105 


92 


77 


76 


• 84 


Haddock : . 


227 


219 


277 


287 


277 


239 


218 


Pollock: 


















255 

149 

97 


297 

194 
60 


299 

194 

61 


365 

212 

80 


412 

161 

96 


311 

160 

91 


255 

170 

63 






Total groundfish, et al... 


122 


108 


lis 


125 


12S 


lis 


100 


175 
86 


91 
86 


115 
63 


171 
86 


173 
126 


199 
137 


195 
69 


Sea herring 


















Chinook 


101 


112 


81 


76 


76 


63 


70 


Chum 


73 


112 


95 


58 


66 


36 


49 


Pink 


57 


69 


59 


73 


67 


38 


52 


Sockeye 


88 


136 


80 


101 


100 


94 


103 


Coho 

Total salmon 

Swordf ish 


72 


84 


74 


76 


54 


48 


70 


82 


113 


78 


85 


82 


69 


81 


102 


111 


92 


107 


104 


103 


91 


















Albacore 


114 


147 


132 


125 


120 


130 


124 




1,158 
83 


477 
72 


766 
85 


666 
127 


954 
83 


229 
82 


353 
93 


Skipjack 




116 


96 


112 


205 


283 


113 


126 




126 


97 


117 


181 


212 


105 


118 


Clams : 


106 


106 


97 


122 


130 


96 


98. 
















Hard 


142 


135 


113 


105 


113 


148 


163 


Ocean quahog 


124 


124 


128 


129 


136 


142 


145 


Soft 


192 


222 


233 


248 


250 


205 


236 


Surf 


84 


83 


88 


118 


118 


115 


116 


132 


133 


126 


133 


138 


147 


159 


Crabs : 
















Blue 


131 


183 


201 


260 


284 


266 


286 




159 


124 


95 


145 


176 


143 


210 




99 

53 


139 
60 


127 
78 


146 
144 


104 
237 


100 
130 


94 
76 






99 


124 


123 


166 


182 


144 


138 




113 
219 


125 
225 


117 
183 


128 
175 


141 
179 


147 
214 


138 
199 




Scallops : 


Bay 


157 


150 


161 


49 


55 


69 


111 


Calico 


(2) 


(2) 


(2) 


94 


124 


. 


217 




110 


132 


159 


138 


138 


153 


179 


Total scallops 

Shrimp : 


135 


IIB 


141 


126 


131 


129 


178:;:: 
















Gulf and South Atlantic. . . 


87 


86 


80 


110 


99 


88 


106 


Other 

Total shrimp 

Total edible shellfish 

Total edible fish 


130 


113 


128 


142 


179 


148 


134 


89 


88 


82 


111 


103 


91 


107 


110 


lis 


110 


138 


13S 


124 


:i34'" 


















108 


111 


104 


131 


133 


111 


117 


Industrial fish, 
















All fish and shellfish 


103 


128 


128 


154 


128 


128 


154 


108 


112 


lOS 


132 


132 


112 


119 



(1) Revised. 

(2) Confidential data. 



118 



VALUE ADDED 



The value added table reflects changes in 
the value of fishery products from year to year, 
using measures such as mark-up, value added as 
a percent of mark-up, and sales of fishery products 
in each sector (1). Using a model developed for 
Fisheries of the U.S. in 1987, the value added 
table is updated every year to reflect changes in 
the annual quantity and value of landings, 
processed products, and imports and exports of 
several species. These annual updates allow 
partial re-estimation of the mark-ups, value added, 
and sales of each sector. 

Complete re-estimation of the annual 
mark-ups and value added requires secondary 
information such as average revenues and costs of 
operation for businesses involved in the 
processing, wholesaling or retailing of fishery 
products. The revenue and cost data needed to 
estimate mark-ups in each sector are only 
published once every five years. In addition, there 
is a two-year lag between the collection and 
publication of these data. Thus, the margins 
estimated in the value added tables from 1992 
through 1996 are based on 1990 financial data that 
became available in 1992. 



The 1997 value added table incorporates 
newly available 1995 financial data, as well as 
1997 fisheries data, to re-estimate the mark-up of 
fishery products at each market level. Therefore, 
the estimated 1997 mark-ups and value added in 
each sector reflect the annual change in fisheries 
activity as well as changes in the economy as a 
whole since 1990. 



To differentiate between the effects of 
changes in the economy from changes in fishing 
activity, the 1997 model was estimated using both 
the old 1990 and the new 1995 financial data. 
Between 1996 and 1997, the estimated total U.S. 
value added activity increased 16%. Half of this 
increase is attributable to the updated financial 
data. Also between 1996 and 1997, estimated 
consumer expenditures increased by almost 13%; 
of this, less than 3% is due to the updated financial 
data. The table presented on the following page 
incorporates the updates from both the financial 
data as well as the new, 1997 fisheries data. The 
1995 financial data will be used in the model until 
new data are available in 2002. 



(1) See footnotes following the value added table for definitions of these terms. 




VALUE ADDED 



119 



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120 



EMPLOYMENT, CRAFT, AND PLANTS 



ESTIMATED NUMBER OF COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS (1) 
AND FISHING BOATS (2) BY REGION AND STATE, 1995 - 1996 





1995 




1996 




REGIONS 


VESSELS 


BOATS 


TOTAL 


VESSELS 


BOATS 


TOTAL 


Northeast Fisheries: 














Connecticut 


149 


392 


541 


336 


420 


756 




32 

1,798 

33 


555 
5,439 


587 

7,237 

33 


23 

1,773 
33 


512 
5,454 
NA 


535 

7,227 

33 




Maryland (3) 


Massachusetts 


805 


4,490 


5,295 


790 


4,525 


5,315 


New Hampshire 


139 


467 


606 


132 


474 


606 


New Jersey 


423 


1,282 


1,705 


360 


1, 167 


1,527 


New York (4) 


698 


2, 924 


3,622 


2,936 


693 


3, 629 


Rhode Island 


291 


2,863 


3, 154 


299 


2,538 


2,837 


Virginia (3 ) 


122 


2,138 


2,260 


122 


NA 


122 


South Atlantic 














and Gulf Fisheries: 














North Carolina 


1,034 


9,361 


10,395 


814 


NA 


814 


South Carolina 


530 


1,022 


1,552 


501 


NA 


501 




305 
2,311 


NA 
8, 919 


305 
11,230 


349 
2, 531 


NA 
9,425 


349 
11,956 


Florida 




378 
438 


720 
874 


1,098 
1,312 


378 
438 


720 
874 


1,098 
1,312 


Mississippi 




2,805 
1,902 


12,969 
1,969 


15,774 
3, 871 


2, 839 


11,883 
NA 


14,722 



Texas 


West Coast Fisheries: 














Washington 


1, 176 


630 


1, 806 


1,909 


1,292 


3,201 




927 
7,264 


378 
9,013 


1,305 
16,277 


860 
7,044 


389 
9,295 


1,249 
16,339 


Alaska 




1,759 
2,583 


1, 570 
NA 


3,329 
2,583 


1, 767 
2,636 


1,483 
NA 


3,250 
2,636 




Great Lakes 


Fisheries: (5) 
















5 
NA 

61 


NA 

75 


5 
NA 

136 


5 
NA 

61 


NA 
NA 

75 


5 
NA 

136 




Michigan 


Minnesota 


2 


29 


31 


1 


23 


24 


New York 


3 


16 


19 


3 


17 


20 




33 
NA 


18 
NA 


51 
NA 


30 

1 


14 
2 


44 
3 


Pennsylvania 




93 


40 


133 


106 


42 


148 





(1) Vessels are documented craft greater than 5 net registered tons. 

(2) Boats are craft less than 5 net registered tons. 

(3) Only Federal collected data are available. Inshore data not available. 

(4) Includes vessels and boats in the Great Lakes. 

(5) Commercial fishing fleet sizes for the Great Lakes states represent only the number of 

licenses issued by the state; therefore, may not be an accurate total. Tribal data 
are not included in this table. 
NA - - Data not available separately. 



EMPLOYMENT, CRAFT, AND PLANTS 



121 





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122 



EMPLOYMENT, CRAFT, AND PLANTS 




FISHERY PRODUCTS INSPECTION 



123 



FISHERY PRODUCTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS INSPECTED IN CALENDAR YEAR, 1997 






Edible 


fishery products 






Establishment 










Region 


(1) 




Amount inspected 






SIFE In- 


Grade 


PUFI No 


Lot 


Total 




plant 


A 


mark 








(2) (3) 


(4) 


(4) (5) 


(6) 






-Averaqe number- 




Thousand pounds - 










Northeast 


118 


28,253 


156,451 80,160 


96,451 


361,315 


Southeast 


135 


12,737 


100,230 45,049 


94,578 


252,594 


West 


16 65 


23,805 


116,750 54,683 


119,670 


314,908 


Total, 1997. 
Total, 1996. 


16 318 


64,795 


373,431 179,891 


310,699 


928,816 


16 319 


72,271 


680,041 185,615 


343,340 


1,201,268 % 



(1) These establishments are inspected under contract and certified as meeting U.S. Department 
of Commerce (USDC) regulations for construction and maintenance of facilities and equipment 
processing techniques, and employment practices. 

(2) Fish processing establishments approved for sanitation under the Sanitary Inspected 
Fish Establishment service (SIFE). Products are not processed under inspection. 

(3) Sanitarily inspected fish establishments processing fishery products under USDC inspection 
As of December 1996, 106 of these establishments were in the Hazard Analysis Critical Control 
Point (HACCP) Program. 

(4) Products processed under USDC inspection in inspected establishments and labeled with 
USDC inspection mark as "Processed Under Federal Inspection" (PUFI) and/or "U.S. Grade A." 

(5) Products processed under inspection in inspected establishments but bearing no USDC 
inspection mark. 

(6) Lot inspected and marked products checked for quality and condition at the time of 
examination and located in processing plants, warehouses, cold storage facilities, or terminal 
markets anywhere in the United States. 

Note: --Table may not add due to rounding. 

Source : --NMFS, Seafood Inspection Division, F/SF6 . 



124 THE MAGNUSON-STEVENS FISHERY CONSERVATION 

AND MANAGEMENT ACT 



The Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation 
and Management Act, Public Law 94-265 as amended 
(Magnuson-Stevens Act), provides for the conservation 
and management of fishery resources within the U.S. 
Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). It also provides for 
fishery management authority over continental shelf 
resources and anadromous species beyond the EEZ, 
except when they are found within a foreign nation's 
territorial sea or fishery conservation zone (or 
equivalent), to the extent that such sea or zone is 
recognized by the United States. 

The EEZ extends from the seaward boundary 
of each of the coastal States (generally 3 nautical miles 
from shore for all but two States) to 200 nautical miles 
from shore. The seaward boundaries of Texas, Puerto 
Rico, and the Gulf coast of Florida are 3 marine 
leagues (9 nautical miles). 



GOVERNING INTERNATIONAL FISHERY 
AGREEMENTS 



Under the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the 
Secretary of State, in cooperation with the Secretary of 
Commerce, negotiates Goveming International Fishery 
Agreements (GIFAs) with foreign nations requesting to 
fish within the EEZ. After a GIFA is signed, it is 
transmitted by the President to the Congress for 
ratification. 



displacement of the foreign fishing effort in the EEZ by 
1991. 

As a result of the above, there has been no 
total allowable level of foreign fishing since 1991, 
although 25,000 mt of Atlantic mackerel and 40,000 mt 
of Atlantic herring were available for joint venture 
fishing in 1997. However, no joint venture permits 
were issued in 1997 because no foreign nations elected 
to participate in joint venture fishing in 1997. NMFS 
continues to maintain certain regulations pertaining to 
foreign fishing, such as the foreign fishing fee 
schedule, should there be a situation in the future in 
which allowing limited foreign fishing in an 
underutilized fishery would be of advantage to the U.S. 
fishing industry. 



FMPs and PMPs 



Under the Magnuson-Stevens Act, eight 
Regional Fishery Management Councils are charged 
with preparing Fishery Management Plans (FMPs) for 
the fisheries needing management within their areas of 
authority. After the Councils prepare FMPs that cover 
domestic and foreign fishing efforts, the FMPs are 
submitted to the Secretary of Commerce (Secretary) 
for approval and implementation. The Department, 
through NMFS agents and the U.S. Coast Guard, is 
responsible for enforcing the law and regulations. 



FOREIGN FISHING PERMITS 



Title II of the Magnuson-Stevens Act governs 
foreign fishing in the EEZ. The process applied to 
foreign fishing has been described in prior issues of this 
publication. As U.S. fishing capacity grew, foreign 
participation in directed fisheries, as well as in foreign 
joint ventures in which U.S. vessels delivered U.S. 
harvested fish to permitted foreign vessels in the EEZ 
diminished until, in 1991, foreign vessels no longer 
were permitted to conduct any harvesting or processing 
operations in the EEZ. This marked the achievement 
of one of the objectives of the Magnuson-Stevens Act, 
that is, the development of the U.S. fishing industry to 
take what were in 1976 underutilized species, and the 



The Secretary is empowered to prepare FMPs 
in the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico for highly migratory 
species. Where no FMP exists. Preliminary Fishery 
Management Plans (PMPs), which only cover foreign 
fishing efforts, are prepared by the Secretary for each 
fishery for which a foreign nation requests a permit. 
The Secretary is also empowered to produce an FMP 
for any fishery that a Council has not duly produced. In 
this latter case, the Secretary's FMP covers domestic 
and foreign fishing. 



As of December 31, 1997, three Preliminary 
Fishery Management Plans (PMPs) were in effect, 
some of which have been amended since first being 
implemented. 



THE MAGNUSON-STEVENS FISHERY CONSERVATION 
AND MANAGEMENT ACT 



125 



The Atlantic swordfish, Atlantic sharks, and 
Atlantic billfish fisheries are currently being managed 
by the Secretary under the Magnuson-Stevens Act 
and the Western Atlantic bluefin tuna fishery is 
managed under the Atlantic Tunas Convention Act. 



FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLANS (FMPs) 



Under section 304 of the Magnuson-Stevens 
Act, all Council-prepared FMPs must be reviewed for 
approval by the Secretary. After FMPs have been 
approved under section 304 of the Magnuson-Stevens 
Act, they are implemented by Federal regulations, under 
section 305 of the Act. Asof December 31, 1997, there 
are 39 FMPs in place. Of these, three are Secretarial 
FMPs for Atlantic highly migratory species. The 36 
FMPs the Councils prepared are listed below. The 
FMPs are amended by the Councils and the 
amendments are submitted for approval under the 
same Secretarial review process as new FMPs. Most of 
the FMPs listed have been amended since initial 
implementation. Those marked with a double asterisk 
(**) were amended in 1997. 



Northeast Multispecies (**) 
American Lobster (**) 
Atlantic Bluefish 
Atlantic Coast Red Drum 
Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish (**) 
Atlantic Salmon 
Atlantic Sea Scallops (**) 
Atlantic Surf Clams and Ocean Quahogs (**) 
Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black Sea 
Bass (**) 



Gulf and South Atlantic Spiny Lobster 

Caribbean Reef Fish 

Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish (**) 

Gulf of Mexico Corals 

South Atlantic Corals 

South Atlantic Golden Crab 

Caribbean Coral Reef Resources 

Gulf of Mexico Shrimp (**) 

Gulf of Mexico Stone Crab 

Gulf of Mexico Red Drum 

Coastal Migratory Pelagics 

Caribbean Queen Conch 

Caribbean Spiny Lobster 

South Atlantic Snapper/Grouper 

South Atlantic Shrimp (**) 

Northern Anchovy 

King and Tanner Crab (**) 

Commercial and Recreational Salmon (**) 

High Seas Salmon 

Pacific Coast Groundfish (**) 

Gulf of Alaska Groundfish (**) 

Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands 

Groundfish (**) 
Alaska Scallops (**) 
Western Pacific Crustaceans 
Western Pacific Precious Corals 
Western Pacific Bottomfish and Seamount 

Groundfish 
Western Pacific Pelagics 



In 1997, NMFS published 862 documents in 
the Federal Register which affected domestic fishing 
issues and either proposed or implemented fishery 
management actions (i.e., FMP and amendments). 
The documents published include hearing, meeting, 
correction, and proposed and final rule documents. 




126 THE MAGNUSON-STEVENS FISHERY CONSERVATION 

AND MANAGEMENT ACT 

REGIONAL FISHERY MANAGEMENT COUNCILS 



Council 



States 






Executive 

Director and 

Address 



NEW ENGLAND 



(Maine, New Hampshire, 
Massachusetts, Rhode 
Island, and Connecticut) 



781-231-0422 
FAX: 565-8937 



Paul J. Howard 
Suntaug Office Park 
5 Broadway (Rt . 1) 
Saugus, MA 01906 



MID-ATLANTIC 



(New York, New Jersey, 
Delaware, Pennsylvania, 
Maryland, Virginia, and 
North Carolina) 



302-674-2331 
FAX: 674-5399 



Daniel T. Furlong 
Federal Bldg., Rm. 211 
300 South New St. 
Dover, DE 19901 



SOtTTH ATLANTIC 



(North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Georgia 
and Florida) 



803-571-4366 
FAX: 769-4520 



Robert K. Mahood 
1 Southpark Circle 
Suite 306 
Charleston, SC 29407 



GULF OF MEXICO 



(Texas, Louisiana 
Mississippi, Alabama, 
and Florida) 



813-228-2815 
FAX: 225-7015 



Wayne E . Swingle 
3018 U.S. Highway 301 

North, Suite 1000 
Tampa, FL 33619 



CARIBBEAN 



(Virginia Islands and 
the Commonwealth 
of Puerto Rico) 



787-766-5926 
FAX: 766-6239 



Miquel A. Rolon 

268 Ave. Munoz Rivera 

Suite 1108 

San Juan, PR 00918 



(California, Washington, 
Oregon, and Idaho) 



503-326-6352 
FAX: 326-6831 



Lawrence D. Six 
2130 S.W. 5th Ave. 
Suite 224 
Portland, OR 97201 



NORTH PACIFIC 



(Alaska, Washington, 
and Oregon) 



907-271-2809 
FAX: 271-2817 



Clarence G. Pautzke 
605 W. 4th Ave. 
Room 3 06 
Anchorage, AK 99501 



WESTERN PACIFIC 



(Hawaii, American 

Samoa, Guam, and the 
Northern Marianas 
Islands) 



808-522-8220 
FAX: 522-8226 



Kitty M. Simonds 
1164 Bishop St. 
Room 14 05 
Honolulu, HI 96813 



NOTE:-Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Virginia are "Commonwealth States." 



MSFCMA 



127 



OPTIMUM YIELD (OY) AND OTHER SPECIFICATIONS, INCLUDING AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR 
JOINT VENTURE PROCESSING: NORTH ATLANTIC, BY SPECIES, 1997 (1) 



Item 


Loligo 
squid 


Illex 
squid 


Atlantic 
mackerel 


Butter- 
fish 


Atlantic 
herring 






ic tons, round we 

(3) 

(5) 1,178,000 

90,000 

(6) 90,000 
50,000 
25,000 






(2) 36,000 

(5) 21,000 

21,000 

21,000 

21, 000 






(2) 30,000 

(5) 19,000 

19,000 

19,000 

19,000 






(2) 16,000 

(5) 7,200 

5,900 

5, 900 

5,900 






(4) 89,000 

89,220 

89,220 

89,220 
49,220 
40,000 




ABC 

Initial OY 


DAH 


DAP 


JVP 


TALFF 





(1) OY=Optimum Yield; ABC=Allowable Biological Catch; DAH=Domestic Annual Harvest; DAP= 

Domestic Annual Processing; JVP=Joint Venture Processing; and TALFF=Total Allowable Level 
of Foreign Fishing. 

(2) Maximum OY based on the Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic mackerel, squid and 

butterf ish. 

(3) Not applicable based on the Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic mackerel, squid and 

butterf ish. 

(4) Maximum OY based on the Preliminary Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic Herring. 

(5) Initial OY can increase to this amount. 

(6) Contains 15,000 metric tons projected recreational catch. 

Source :--NMFS, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, F/SF; and NMFS, Northeast Region, F/NER. 




128 



MAIL 

ROUTI NQ 

CODE 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

14th and Constitution Ave., NW 
Washington, DC 20230 



Secretary of Commerce 

William Daley 

Under Secretary for Oceans and Atmospheric 

D. James Baker 



TELEPHONE 
NUMBER 

202-482-2112 
202-482-3436 



NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE 

1315 East-West Highway 

Silver Spring Metro Center #3 (SSIVIC) 

Silver Spring, MD 20910 

F Assistant Administrator for Fisheries -- 

Rolland A. Schmitten 301-713-2239 

Deputy Assistant Administrator for Fisheries -- 

Andrew A. Rosenberg 301-713-2239 

Fxl Staff Office for Industry and Trade -- 

Linda Chaves 301-713-2379 

Fx2 Staff Office for Intergovermaental and 

Recreational Fisheries -- 

Richard Schaefer 301-427-2401 

Fx3 Equal Employment Opportunity -- 

Natalie Huff 301-713-2252 

Fx4 Seafood Inspection Program -- 

Samuel W. McKeen 301-713-2351 

F/EN Office of Law Enforcement -- 

David McKinney 301-427-2300 

F/ENl Enforcement Operations Division 301-427-2300 

F/ENll Enforcement Programs Branch 301-427-2300 

F/HC Office of Habitat Conservation -- 

Joseph Blum 301-713-2325 

F/HCxl Chesapeake Bay Program Office 410-267-5660 

F/HCl Watershed Division 301-713-2325 

F/HC2 Habitat Protection Division 301-713-2325 

F/HC3 Habitat Restoration Division 301-713-0174 

F/OMX Office of Operations, Management & Information -- 

Steven Pennoyer (Acting) 301-713-2239 

F/OMIl Administrative & Budget Processes Division 301-713-2245 

F/0MI2 Planning and Development Division 301-713-2252 

F/0MI3 Information Management Division 301-713-2372 



(CONTINUED) 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION 



129 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
Silver Spring, Md. 20910 



MAIL 

ROUTI NQ 

CODE 



TELEPHONE 
NUMBER 



F/PR Office of Protected Resources -- 

Hilda Diaz-Soltero 

F/PRxl Marine Biodiversity Team 

F/PRl Permits and Documentation Division 

F/PR2 Marine Mammal Conservation Division 

F/PR3 Endangered Species Division 



301-713-2332 
301-713-2319 
301-713-2289 
301-713-2322 
301-713-1401 



F/SF Office of Sustainable Fisheries - 

Gary Matlock 

F/A2SF Highly Migratory Species Division 

F/SF2 Financial Services Division 

F/SF3 Domestic Fisheries Division 

F/SF4 International Fisheries Division 

F/SF5 Regulatory Services Division 

F/SF6 National Seafood Laboratory 



301-713-2334 
301-713-2347 
301-713-2390 
301-713-2341 
301-713-2376 
301-713-2337 
GOl-769-8964 



F/ST Office of Science and Technology -- 

William Fox 

F/STl Fisheries Statistics & Economics Division 

F/ST2 Science and Technology Division 

F/ST21 Scientific Publications Unit 

F/ST3 International Science Coordination and 
Analysis Division 



301-713-2367 
301-713-2328 
301-713-2372 
206-526-6107 

301-713-2288 



LAll Office of Congressional Affairs - Fisheries 

Peter Hill 



301-713-2263 



PAF 



Office of Public Affairs - Fisheries 

Scott Smullen / Gordon Helms 



301-713-2370 



GCF 



Office of General Counsel 

Margaret Hayes 



Fisheries 



301-713-2231 



130 



MAIL 

ROUTING 

CODE 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION 
NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE 

REGIONAL FACILITIES 

TELEPHONE 
and FAX 
NUMBER 



LOCATION 



F/NBR 



F/NEC3 



F/NESC3 



F/SBR 



F/SEFSC 



F/SEC4 



F/SEC5 



F/SEC6 



F/SEC7 



Northeast Reg-ion 
One Blackburn Drive 
Gloucester, MA 01930 

Northeast Fisheries Science Center 
166 Water St. - Rm. 312 
Woods Hole, MA 02543 

Woods Hole Laboratory 
166 Water St. 
Woods Hole, MA 02543 

Narragansett Laboratory 
2 8 Tarwell Drive 
Narragansett, RI 02882 

Milford Laboratory 
Milford, CT 06460 

Sandy Hook Laboratory 
Building 74, McGruder 
Highlands, NJ 07732 

Oxford Laboratory 
904 S. Morris St. 
Oxford, MD 21654 

Natl. Systematica Laboratory, MRC153 
10th Sc Constitution Ave., NW 
Washington, DC 20560 

Southeast Region 
9721 Executive Center Drive, N. 
St. Petersburg, FL 33702 

Southeast Fisheries Science 
Center, 75 Virginia Beach Dr. 
Miami, FL 3 314 9 

Miami Laboratory 
75 Virginia Beach Dr. 
Miami, FL 3314 9 



Mississippi Laboratories 
3209 Frederick St., P.O. 
Pascagula, MS 39567 

Panama City Laboratory 

3 500 Delwood Beach Rd. 
Panama City, FL 32408 

Galveston Laboratory 

4 700 Avenue U 
Galveston, TX 77551 



Drawer 120 



978-281-9300 
Fax-281-9371 



508-548-5123 
Fax-548-5124 



508-495-5123 
Fax-495-2258 



401-782-3200 
Fax-782-3201 



860-873-4200 
FAX-873-4212 



732-872-3000 
FAX-872-3088 



410-226-5193 
FAX-226-5925 



202-357-2550 
FAX-357-2986 



727-570-5301 
FAX-570-5300 



305-361-4284 
FAX-361-4219 



305-361-4225 
FAX-361-4499 



228-762-4591 
FAX-769-9200 



850-234-6541 
FAX-235-3559 



409-766-3500 
FAX-766-3508 



Gloucester, MA 



Woods Hole, MA 



Woods Hole, MA 



Narragansett, RI 



Milford, CT 



Highlands, NJ 



Oxford, MD 



Washington, DC 



St . Petersburgr, FL 



Miami, FL 



Miami, FL 



Pascagoula, MS 



Panama City, FL 



Galveston, TX 



(Continued) 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION 



131 



NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE 



MAIL 

ROUTINQ 

CODE 



REGIONAL FACILITIES 



TELEPHONE 
and FAX 
NU M BER 



LOCATION 



F/SEC8 Charleston Laboratory 
219 Fort Johnson Rd. 
Charleston, SC 29412 

F/SEC9 Beaufort Laboratory 
101 Pivers Island 
Beaufort, NC 28516 

F/NWR Northwest Region 

7600 Sand Point Way, N.E. 
BIN C15700, Bldg. 1 
Seattle, WA 98115 

F/NWC Northwest Fisheries Science Center 
West Bldg. - Rm. 363 
2725 Montl